References of "Malchair, Sandrine"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMicrobial biomass and C and N transformations in forest floors under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir at four temperate forest sites
Malchair, Sandrine ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg

in Soil Biology & Biochemistry (2009), 41

The purpose of this research was to compare soil chemistry, microbially mediated carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformations and microbial biomass in forest floors under European beech (Fagus sylvatica L ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this research was to compare soil chemistry, microbially mediated carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformations and microbial biomass in forest floors under European beech (Fagus sylvatica L), sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Lieblein), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L) Karst) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco) at four study sites. We measured soil chemical characteristics, net N mineralization, potential and relative nitrification, basal respiration, microbial and metabolic quotient and microbial biomass C and N under monoculture stands at all sites (one mixed stand). Tree species affected soil chemistry, microbial activities and biomass. but these effects 'varied between sites. Our results indicated that the effect of tree species on net N mineralization was likely to be mediated through their effect on soil microbial biomass, reflecting their influence on organic matter content and carbon availability. Differences in potential nitrification and relative nitrification might be related to the presence of ground vegetation through its influence on soil NH4 and labile C availability. Our findings highlight the need to study the effects of tree species on microbial activities at several sites to elucidate complex N cycle interactions between tree species, ground vegetation, soil characteristics and microbial processes. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiomass production in experimental grasslands of different species richness during three years of climate warming
De Boeck, H. J.; Lemmens, CMHM; Zavalloni, C. et al

in Biogeosciences (2008), 5

Here we report on the single and combined impacts of climate warming and species richness on the biomass production in experimental grassland communities. Projections of a future warmer climate have ... [more ▼]

Here we report on the single and combined impacts of climate warming and species richness on the biomass production in experimental grassland communities. Projections of a future warmer climate have stimulated studies on the response of terrestrial ecosystems to this global change. Experiments have likewise addressed the importance of species numbers for ecosystem functioning. There is, however, little knowledge on the interplay between warming and species richness. During three years, we grew experimental plant communities containing one, three or nine grassland species in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers in Wilrijk, Belgium. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures (unheated), while the other half were warmed by 3 degrees C (heated). Equal amounts of water were added to heated and unheated communities, so that warming would imply drier soils if evapotranspiration was higher. Biomass production was decreased due to warming, both aboveground (-29%) and belowground (-25%), as negative impacts of increased heat and drought stress in summer prevailed. Complementarity effects, likely mostly through both increased aboveground spatial complementarity and facilitative effects of legumes, led to higher shoot and root biomass in multi-species communities, regardless of the induced warming. Surprisingly, warming suppressed productivity the most in 9-species communities, which may be attributed to negative impacts of intense interspecific competition for resources under conditions of high abiotic stress. Our results suggest that warming and the associated soil drying could reduce primary production in many temperate grasslands, and that this will not necessarily be mitigated by efforts to maintain or increase species richness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombined effects of climate warming and plant diversity loss on above- and below-ground grassland productivity
De Boeck, H. J.; Lemmens, CMHM; Gielen, B. et al

in Environmental and Experimental Botany (2007), 60(1), 95-104

Projections of global change predict both increases of the surface temperature and decreases of biodiversity, but studies on the combined impact of both on terrestrial ecosystems are lacking. We assessed ... [more ▼]

Projections of global change predict both increases of the surface temperature and decreases of biodiversity, but studies on the combined impact of both on terrestrial ecosystems are lacking. We assessed the impact of these two global changes on above- and below-ground productivity of grassland communities. Experimental ecosystems containing one, three or nine grassland species were grown in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers in Wilrijk, Belgium. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures, while the other half were warmed by 3 degrees C. Equal amounts of water were added to heated and unheated communities, so that any increases in evapotranspiration due to warmer conditions would result in a drier soil. Warming led to a decreased productivity of both above-ground plant parts (-18%) and roots (-23%), which coincided with a significantly lower soil water content. Complementarity in resource use and/or facilitation slightly enhanced above-ground productivity in multi-species communities, regardless of the induced warming. Interactive effects between temperature treatment and species richness level were found below-ground, however, where warming nullified the positive effect of richness on root productivity. Future warmer conditions could further increase losses of productivity associated with declining species numbers. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiomass production in experimental grasslands of different species richness during three years of climate warming
de Boeck, H. J.; Lemmens, CMHM; Gielen, B. et al

in Biogeosciences Discussions (2007), 4

Here we report on the single and combined impacts of climate warming and species richness on the biomass production in experimental grassland communities. Projections of a future warmer climate have ... [more ▼]

Here we report on the single and combined impacts of climate warming and species richness on the biomass production in experimental grassland communities. Projections of a future warmer climate have stimulated studies on the response of terrestrial ecosystems to this global change. Experiments have likewise addressed the importance of species numbers for ecosystem functioning. There is, however, little knowledge on the interplay between warming and species richness. During three years, we grew experimental plant communities containing one, three or nine grassland species in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers in Wilrijk, Belgium. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures (unheated), while the other half were warmed by 3 degrees C (heated). Equal amounts of water were added to heated and unheated communities, so that warming would imply drier soils if evapotranspiration was higher. Biomass production was decreased due to warming, both aboveground (-29%) and belowground (-25%), as negative impacts of increased heat and drought stress in summer prevailed. Complementarity effects, likely mostly through both increased aboveground spatial complementarity and facilitative effects of legumes, led to higher shoot and root biomass in multi-species communities, regardless of the induced warming. Surprisingly, warming suppressed productivity the most in 9-species communities, which may be attributed to negative impacts of intense interspecific competition for resources under conditions of high abiotic stress. Our results suggest that warming and the associated soil drying could reduce primary production in many temperate grasslands, and that this will not necessarily be mitigated by efforts to maintain or increase species richness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDo plant species and climate warming influence nitrification and ammonia oxidiser community structure
Malchair, Sandrine ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg

in Belgian Biodiversity Platform, 2007 Conference: Biodiversity and Climate Change, 21-22 May 2007, Brussels (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow do climate warming and plant species richness affect water use in experimental grasslands?
De Boeck, H. J.; Lemmens, CMHM; Bossuyt, H. et al

in Plant and Soil (2006), 288

Climate warming and plant species richness loss have been the subject of numerous experiments, but studies on their combined impact are lacking. Here we studied how both warming and species richness loss ... [more ▼]

Climate warming and plant species richness loss have been the subject of numerous experiments, but studies on their combined impact are lacking. Here we studied how both warming and species richness loss affect water use in grasslands, while identifying interactions between these global changes. Experimental ecosystems containing one, three or nine grassland species from three functional groups were grown in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers (2.25 m(2) ground area) in Wilrijk, Belgium. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures (unheated), while the other half were warmed by 3 degrees C (heated). Equal amounts of water were added to heated and unheated communities, so that warming would imply drier soils if evapotranspiration (ET) was higher. After an initial ET increase in response to warming, stomatal regulation and lower above-ground productivity resulted in ET values comparable with those recorded in the unheated communities. As a result of the decreased biomass production, water use efficiency (WUE) was reduced by warming. Higher complementarity and the improved competitive success of water-efficient species in mixtures led to an increased WUE in multi-species communities as compared to monocultures, regardless of the induced warming. However, since the WUE of individual species was affected in different ways by higher temperatures, compositional changes in mixtures seem likely under climatic change due to shifts in competitiveness. In conclusion, while increased complementarity and selection of water-efficient species ensured more efficient water use in mixtures than monocultures, global warming will likely decrease this WUE, and this may be most pronounced in species-rich communities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 ULg)
See detail'Do plant species and climate warming influence nitrification and ammonia oxidiser community structure
Malchair, Sandrine ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg

in 11th International symposium on microbial ecology (ISME-11) 'The Hidden Powers – Microbial Communities in Action', Vienna, Austria, August 20-25, 2006, Book of Abstracts (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnd-of-season effects of elevated temperature on ecophysiological processes of grassland species at different species richness levels
Lemmens, CMHM; De Boeck, H. J.; Gielen, B. et al

in Environmental and Experimental Botany (2006), 56

The combined effect of declining diversity and elevated temperature is a less-studied aspect of global change. We investigated the influence of those two factors and their possible interactions oil leaf ... [more ▼]

The combined effect of declining diversity and elevated temperature is a less-studied aspect of global change. We investigated the influence of those two factors and their possible interactions oil leaf ecophysiological processes in artificial grassland communities. Changes at the leaf level are at the basis of changes at the community level (and vice versa) but have remained largely unexplored in biodiversity experiments. We focused on end-of-season responses to assess whether species richness and air temperature affect the duration of the growing season. Grassland model ecosystems were used in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures, while the other half were Nvarnied 3 degrees C. Each chamber contained 24 plant communities, created with nine grassland species: three grass species. three nitrogen (N) fixers and three non-N-fixing dicots. Each plant community consisted of either one, three or nine species in order to create different species richness levels. Various ecophysiological variables (processes and characteristics) and above ground biomass were influenced by temperature. In several variables, the effects of temperature and species richness varied with species. No single-factor species richness effect was found due to opposite responses of the species canceling out the effect. We expect that these interactions may increase with time. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpacts of elevated CO2 on net nitrification and on the community structure of ammonia oxidising bacteria
Malchair, Sandrine ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg

in Biodiversity: state, stakes and future; 7,8 & 9 April 2004, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, Symposium, Programme, Abstracts, Participants (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailElevated atmospheric CO2 influences ammonia oxidiser community structure and net nitrification
Carnol, Monique ULg; Malchair, Sandrine ULg

Conference (2003, September)

The control of soil nitrogen (N) availability under elevated atmospheric CO2 is central to predicting changes in ecosystem carbon storage and primary productivity. The effects of elevated CO2 on ... [more ▼]

The control of soil nitrogen (N) availability under elevated atmospheric CO2 is central to predicting changes in ecosystem carbon storage and primary productivity. The effects of elevated CO2 on belowground processes have so far attracted limited research and they are assumed to be controlled by indirect effects through changes in plant physiology and chemistry. In this study, we investigated the effects of a 4-year exposure to elevated CO2 (ambient + 400 μmol mol-1) in open top chambers under Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on net nitrification and the community of ammonia-oxidising bacteria. Net nitrate production was significantly increased for soil from the elevated CO2 treatment in the field when incubated in the laboratory under elevated CO2, but there was no effect when incubated under ambient CO2. Net nitrate production of the soil originating from the ambient CO2 treatment in the field was not influenced by laboratory incubation conditions. These results indicate that a direct effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil microbial processes might take place. Molecular analysis of the ammonia-oxidising bacteria from the same soils before laboratory incubation was investigated using a PCR-based approach targeting the 16S rRNA gene of beta-subgroup ammonia oxidisers. After specific PCR, DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and sequence analysis were used to determine ammonia-oxidiser community structure. First results indicate the disappearance of Nitrosospira clusters I, II and III under elevated CO2 but also call for systematic analysis of replicates to take into account methodological and sample variability. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailImpacts de l’augmentation de la concentration en CO2 atmosphérique sur la composition de la communauté microbienne en bactéries oxydant l’ammoniac du sol.
Malchair, Sandrine ULg

Master of advanced studies dissertation (2003)

Résumé du mémoire de DEA Il reste, actuellement, peu de doutes quant au fait que le climat à l’échelle de la Terre s’est modifié au XXème siècle. De nombreuses évidences suggèrent que ces changements sont ... [more ▼]

Résumé du mémoire de DEA Il reste, actuellement, peu de doutes quant au fait que le climat à l’échelle de la Terre s’est modifié au XXème siècle. De nombreuses évidences suggèrent que ces changements sont liés aux activités anthropiques qui ont accru la concentration atmosphérique en gaz à effet de serre, notamment celle en dioxyde de carbone. Cette augmentation de la concentration en dioxyde de carbone et les changements climatiques associés entraîneront des réponses complexes des écosystèmes. Bien qu’il soit établi que les microorganismes jouent un rôle clé dans le cycle des éléments nutritifs, les conséquences d’une telle augmentation de la concentration en CO2 pour les microbiota du sol sont inconnues. Le cycle de l’azote est particulièrement digne d’intérêt car l’azote est, après le carbone, l’élément le plus important pour la vie des plantes. La nitrification est l’étape clé du cycle de l’azote. En effet, elle influence la productivité primaire, peut causer l’acidification des sols et le lessivage de nitrates. De plus la disponibilité de l’azote dans les sols est un élément régulateur de l’immobilisation du carbone de l’écosystème dans la biomasse des plantes ou des microorganismes du sol. Ce mémoire étudie la composition de la communauté microbienne du sol en bactéries oxydant l’ammoniac (AOB) sous concentration en dioxyde de carbone ambiante ou élevée afin de vérifier si l’augmentation de la concentration en CO2 affecte la communauté de bactéries oxydant l’ammoniac. Ce mémoire s’intègre dans l’étude de l’effet d’une concentration en CO2 élevée sur la nitrification et la dénitrification potentielle (Carnol et al., 2002). Cette étude a nécessité quelques étapes préalables. En effet, il a été nécessaire de renouveler le stock de clusters contrôle (séquence caractéristique des AOB incluses dans des vecteurs). Ce stock a pu être renouvelé par transformation (électroporation) des cellules d’Escherichia coli. Bien que la migration de ces nouveaux clusters contrôle dans le gradient dénaturant diffère légèrement de celle des clusters de la littérature, nous pouvons affirmer, après séquençage, que ces clusters correspondent à ceux décrits dans la littérature. Ensuite, nous avons appliqué le protocole PCR employé pour amplifier les clusters contrôle à l’ADN extrait à partir de nos échantillons de sol lyophilisés. Il est apparu que les conditions prévalant pour l’amplification des clusters contrôle n’étaient pas applicables à nos échantillons de sol. En effet, des produits aspécifiques se sont formés et le rendement de la réaction était faible. C’est pourquoi nous avons optimisé la réaction de PCR. Les conditions permettant d’atteindre un bon compromis entre l’efficacité et la spécificité de la réaction pour nos échantillons ( en employant les amorces CTO spécifiques des AOB) sont les suivantes : température d’annealing de 59°C, concentration en amorce de 20 pmoles par réaction. Ces conditions conviennent aussi bien pour l’amplification pour l’amplification de l’ADN contenu dans les échantillons que pour celle des clusters contrôle. Enfin, nous avons envisagé l’étude de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB à partir des échantillons de sols lyophilisés issus de chambres sous concentration en CO2 ambiante ou élevée. Nous avons testé la reproductibilité des techniques employées c’est à dire celle des extractions d’ADN génomique réalisées à partir de nos échantillons et celle de la PCR ; Nous avons, également, étudié la variabilité de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB au sein d’une chambre ; Pour finir, nous avons envisagé l’effet possible de l’augmentation de la concentration en CO2 sur la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB. Il apparaît que, bien que le rendement des extractions génomiques ne soit pas reproductible, cette différence influence peu le pattern de bandes révélées pour la DGGE du point de vue des clusters dominants. De plus, bien que les amplifications d’ADN par PCR à partir des échantillons soient également variables du point de vue de la spécificité et du rendement, cette différence a peu d’impacts sur le pattern de bandes révélées par la DGGE si la PCR permet une amplification suffisante de l’ADN. Cela montre l’importance de l’optimisation de la réaction avant toute nouvelle expérimentation. On a pu constater qu’il n’y a pas de variabilité de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB au sein d’une chambre. Cependant, un changement de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB a été observé dans les couches de sol exposées trois ans à une teneur en CO2 élevée. Ce changement n’est pas perceptible pour les couches exposées une seule année au traitement. L’exposition longue à une concentration en CO2 supérieure entraîne la disparition des clusters I, II et III. En conclusion, il a été possible de renouveler notre stock de clusters contrôle. L’ADN cible spécifique des AOB est amplifiable par PCR. Cependant, il apparaît que les protocoles PCR ne sont pas transposables. C’est pourquoi, il est nécessaire d’optimiser la réaction de PCR. Le pattern de bandes DGGE est représentatif de la de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB si l’ADN amplifié est en quantité et de qualité suffisantes. Aucune variabilité de la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB n’a été observée au sein d’une chambre. Une exposition longue à un concentration élevée en dioxyde de carbone, contrairement à une exposition de courte durée, modifie la composition de la communauté microbienne en AOB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailElevated atmospheric CO2 influences ammonia oxidiser community structure and net nitrification
Carnol, Monique ULg; Malchair, Sandrine ULg

in International Symposium: Structure and Function of Soil Microbiota, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany, September 18-20, 2003 (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (2 ULg)
See detailLa nitrification dans le cadre du traitement des eaux usées: production de nitrites, préservation des nitrifiants et effet d'un support
Malchair, Sandrine ULg

Master's dissertation (2002)

Le monde actuel est confronté à de nombreux problèmes environnementaux résultant des activités anthropiques. Parmi ceux-ci se pose le problème de la pollution de l’eau. Veiller au maintien de la qualité ... [more ▼]

Le monde actuel est confronté à de nombreux problèmes environnementaux résultant des activités anthropiques. Parmi ceux-ci se pose le problème de la pollution de l’eau. Veiller au maintien de la qualité de l’eau devient une nécessité pour les sociétés humaines. Ce mémoire s’inscrit dans le cadre du traitement des eaux usées. Nous avons étudié le processus de nitrification, qui associé à la dénitrification, permet de diminuer l’impact de la pollution par l’azote. Ce mémoire s’inscrit dans le cadre d’un projet de la région wallonne qui étudie l’élimination de la charge azotée des eaux usées d’origine agricole par dans une première phase, le développement d’un procédé biotechnologique permettant de produire préférentiellement des nitrites ; pour ensuite, éliminer ceux-ci par dénitrification. La nitrification peut être définie comme étant la transformation biologique de composés organiques et inorganiques (NH4+) d’une forme réduite en forme plus oxydée (NO2-, NO3-). Ce processus peut être le fait d’organismes autotrophes et hétérotrophes. La présence de nitrate dans les cours d’eau peut provoquer l’eutrophisation de ces systèmes aquatiques entraînant des conditions anoxiques et la diminution de la diversité. Ce mémoire est composé de trois chapitres traitant chacun un aspect de la nitrification dans le traitement des eaux usées. Le premier chapitre tente de déterminer les conditions du milieu favorisant les bactéries responsables de la nitritation. Pour cela, des systèmes d’étude en continu sont mis en place. Lors de cette expérience, il est apparu nécessaire de toujours disposer d’inocula stables. C’est pourquoi, dans le second chapitre, nous avons testé différentes méthodes de préservation des populations bactériennes. Le dernier chapitre de ce mémoire étudie l’effet de différents supports sur la nitrification. Dans le premier volet de ce mémoire, les systèmes de culture en continu ont permis d’établir les conditions du milieu favorables à la production de nitrites. Ces conditions sont les suivantes : Concentration en N-NH4+ de 300 mg N/l, pH de 8.2 ± 0.2, température de 30°C et concentration en oxygène dissous inférieure à 2mg/l. Les paramètres les plus importants pour favoriser les populations bactériennes oxydant l’ammonium sont le pH et la teneur en oxygène dissous. Nous avons mis en évidence que les fluctuations de pH sont néfastes pour le maintien de la nitritation. Les teneurs en oxygènes dissous faibles (inférieures à 2mg/l) stimulent les bactéries oxydant l’ammonium mais n’affectent pas celles qui oxydent les nitrites. Le second volet de ce mémoire étudie les méthodes de préservation de la population nitrifiante afin d’envisager la méthode de stockage adéquate permettant à ces populations de maintenir leur activité nitrifiante. Les différentes méthodes de conservation envisagées sont les suivantes : conservation à court terme à 4°C, conservation à plus long terme à -20°C, -80°C ou par lyophilisation, en présence ou en absence de cryoprotecteurs (DMSO et glycérol). Il apparaît que les traitements employés ont des effets significatifs sur les taux de production de nitrites plus nitrates (p<0.05). La lyophilisation ne semble pas être une technique adéquate pour la préservation des nitrifiants. L’emploi de DMSO comme cryoprotecteur semble plus adéquat que l’emploi de glycérol. La conservation à court terme à 4°C semble appropriée aux nitrifiants. A plus long terme, la conservation à -80°C en présence de DMSO semble la plus adéquate aux populations de bactéries nitrifiantes. Le dernier volet de ce mémoire envisage l’effet d’un support sur la nitrification. Notre hypothèse de départ était que la présence d’un support favorise la nitrification. Dans le sol, les bactéries se lient fortement aux argiles. Nous avons utilisé quatre argiles comme support dans cette expérience. Nous avons employé, également des cubes de mousses de polyuréthane (grande surface pour que les bactéries se fixent) et de la craie (tamponner le milieu). Les traitements envisagés n’ont aucun effet significatif sur la production de nitrites plus nitrates (p> 0.05). Notre hypothèse de départ a été infirmée. Cependant, aucune inhibition due à la présence du support sur la nitrification n’est observée. En conclusion, nous pouvons dire qu’il est possible en ajustant le pH et la teneur en oxygène dissous de favoriser les populations de bactéries oxydant l’ammoniac et donc la production de nitrites. Les conservations à court et à long terme de populations nitrifiantes sont envisageables. La présence de support a maintenu la nitrification à un taux identique à celui observé pour des populations témoins sans support. Malgré leurs propriétés respectives, aucun support testé n’a favorisé la nitrification. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (3 ULg)