References of "Mahieu, Emmanuel"
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See detailCarbon monoxide retrieved from ground based FTIR remote sensing in the mid-­‐ and near infrared spectral region
Petri, Christof; Blumenstock, Thomas; Hase, Frank et al

Conference (2014, May 14)

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See detailLong-term evolution and seasonal modulation of methanol above Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8.0°E): Optimisation of the retrieval strategy, comparison with model and independant observations
Bader, Whitney ULg; Stavrakou, J; Muller, J-F et al

Poster (2014, May)

Methanol (CH3OH) is the second most abundant organic compound in the Earth’s atmosphere after methane. In this work, we present the first long-term time series of methanol total, lower tropospheric and ... [more ▼]

Methanol (CH3OH) is the second most abundant organic compound in the Earth’s atmosphere after methane. In this work, we present the first long-term time series of methanol total, lower tropospheric and upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric partial columns derived from the analysis of high resolution Fourier transform infrared solar spectra recorded at the Jungfraujoch station (46.5°N, 3580 m a.s.l.). The retrieval of methanol is very challenging due to strong absorptions of ozone in the region of the selected 8 band of CH3OH. Two wide spectral intervals have been defined and adjusted in order to maximize the information content. Methanol does not exhibit a significant trend over the 1995-2012 time period, but a strong seasonal modulation characterized by maximum values and variability in June-July, minimum columns in winter and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 130 %. In situ measurements performed at the Jungfraujoch and ACE-FTS occultations give similar results for the methanol seasonal variation. The total and lower tropospheric columns are also compared with IMAGESv2 model simulations. There is no systematic bias between the observations and IMAGESv2 but the model underestimates the peak-to-peak amplitude of the seasonal modulations. [less ▲]

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See detailSeeking for causes of recent methane increase: comparison between GEOS-Chem tagged simulations and FTIR column measurements above Jungfraujoch
Bader, Whitney ULg; Bovy, Benoît ULg; Wecht, K et al

Poster (2014, May)

Atmospheric CH4 reached 260% of the pre-industrial level (~700 ppb) due to increased emissions from anthropogenic sources. Globally averaged CH4 reached a new high of 1819 ± 1 ppb in 2012, an increase of ... [more ▼]

Atmospheric CH4 reached 260% of the pre-industrial level (~700 ppb) due to increased emissions from anthropogenic sources. Globally averaged CH4 reached a new high of 1819 ± 1 ppb in 2012, an increase of 6 ppb with respect to the previous year (WMO, Greenhouse gas Bulletin N.9, 2013). CH4 above Jungfraujoch increases at 0.53±0.19%/year during the late 90s to stabilize and reach a non significant trend from 2000 to 2005. Since 2006, atmospheric methane has been continuously increasing with a rate of 0.19±0.05 %/year. The attribution of this increase to any CH4 source is difficult since the current network is insufficient to characterize emissions by region and source process, emphasizing the need for source-tagged model simulations as it should provide us information on processes causing the increase of atmospheric methane since 2005/2006. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrieval of HCHO from MAX-DOAS measurements at the high-altitude alpine station of Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8.0°E)
Hendrick, François; Fayt, Caroline; Franco, Bruno ULg et al

Conference (2014, April 30)

Formaldehyde (HCHO) plays an important intermediate role in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways. It is produced during the oxidation of methane and many non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs ... [more ▼]

Formaldehyde (HCHO) plays an important intermediate role in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways. It is produced during the oxidation of methane and many non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) which participate to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. HCHO is also directly released by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion and to a lesser extent by vegetation. Measuring this species is therefore of major importance for air quality and climate change monitoring. In this presentation, HCHO near-surface concentrations and vertical column densities are retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements performed at the high-altitude station of Jungfraujoch (3580m asl) in the Swiss Alps from July 2010 till December 2012. Although being most of the time located in the free troposphere, this station can be temporarily affected by pollution events originating from the valley, leading to a local increase of air pollutant concentrations. The capability of the MAX-DOAS technique to retrieve HCHO in such high-altitude location is investigated. The spatial representativeness and the impact of cloud cover on the measurements is also discussed. For verification purpose, our retrievals are compared to collocated FTIR observations, taking into account the difference in vertical resolution between both techniques. Simulations from the 3D-CTM IMAGES are also used to further assess the observed seasonal and diurnal cycles of HCHO surface concentration and vertical column. [less ▲]

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See detailSpectrometric monitoring of atmospheric carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) above the Jungfraujoch station since 1989: evidence of continued increase but at a slowing rate
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Zander, Rodolphe ULg; Toon, G. C. et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2014), 7

The long-term evolution of the vertical column abundance of carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) above the high-altitude Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.) has been derived from the ... [more ▼]

The long-term evolution of the vertical column abundance of carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) above the high-altitude Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.) has been derived from the spectrometric analysis of Fourier transform infrared solar spectra recorded at that site between 1989 and 2012. The investigation is based on a multi-microwindow approach, two encompassing pairs of absorption lines belonging to the R-branch of the strong ν3 band of CF4 centered at 1283 cm−1, and two additional ones to optimally account for weak but overlapping HNO3 interferences. The analysis reveals a steady accumulation of the very long-lived CF4 above the Jungfraujoch at mean rates of (1.38 ± 0.11) × 1013 molec cm−2 yr−1 from 1989 to 1997, and (0.98 ± 0.02) × 1013 molec cm−2 yr−1 from 1998 to 2012, which correspond to linear growth rates of 1.71 ± 0.14 and 1.04 ± 0.02% yr−1 respectively referenced to 1989 and 1998. Related global CF4 anthropogenic emissions required to sustain these mean increases correspond to 15.8 ± 1.3 and 11.1 ± 0.2 Gg yr−1 over the above specified time intervals. Findings reported here are compared and discussed with respect to relevant northern mid-latitude results obtained remotely from space and balloons as well as in situ at the ground, including new gas chromatography mass spectrometry measurements performed at the Jungfraujoch since 2010. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent results from long-term FTIR monitoring activities at Jungfraujoch: some unexpected trends and new target species
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg

Scientific conference (2014, January)

Recent results derived from the long-term FTIR monitoring activities conducted by the University of Liège at the Jungfraujoch station are presented, with a focus on new target species.

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See detailRecent increases in Stratospheric HCl: Stratospheric Dynamics versus the Montreal Protocol
Chipperfield, M.P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Notholt, J. et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2014), 16

Long-lived chlorine-containing source gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and cause ozone depletion. Increases in chlorine during the ... [more ▼]

Long-lived chlorine-containing source gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and cause ozone depletion. Increases in chlorine during the 1970s-1990s resulted in long-term ozone decreases, especially in the polar regions. Following the implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the near-surface chlorine loading was observed to peak in 1993 and, since then, to decrease in line with expectations. After release from source gases in the stratosphere, chlorine mainly forms the reservoir HCl, providing an alternative method for monitoring the progress of the Montreal Protocol. A maximum in stratospheric HCl was observed around 1996, followed by decay at a rate close to 1%/year, consistent with the tropospheric chlorine peak and known transport timescales. However, we will present total column observations from ground-based FTIR instruments which show an unexpected and significant upturn in stratospheric HCl around 2007 in the northern hemisphere. Height-resolved observations from satellite instruments (HALOE, MLS, ACE) confirm this increase and show that it occurs in the lower stratosphere. These observations contrast with the ongoing monotonic decrease of near-surface chlorine source gases. Using 3-D model simulations (TOMCAT/SLIMCAT and KASIMA) we attribute this trend anomaly to a slowdown in the NH atmospheric circulation, causing air in the lower stratosphere to become more aged with a larger relative conversion of source gases to HCl. An important conclusion is that the Montreal Protocol is still on track and will still lead to long-term decreases in stratospheric chlorine. This dynamical variability could also significantly affect the evolution of stratospheric ozone and must be accounted for when searching for signs of ozone recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailPas d'image fiable de notre atmosphère sans mesures depuis le sol !
De Mazière, M; De Backer, H; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg et al

Article for general public (2014)

Nous sommes actuellement confrontés à une atmosphère en évolution : les concentrations de ce qu’on appelle les gaz à effet de serre augmentent, la quantité d’ozone stratosphérique diminue, en particulier ... [more ▼]

Nous sommes actuellement confrontés à une atmosphère en évolution : les concentrations de ce qu’on appelle les gaz à effet de serre augmentent, la quantité d’ozone stratosphérique diminue, en particulier au-dessus de l’Antarctique où elle forme chaque année un ‘trou’ dans la couche d’ozone, et l’air n’est pas tous les jours très sain... Comment pouvons-nous détecter et surveiller ces changements pour, si nécessaire, prendre des mesures pour tenter de les contrecarrer ? [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of continuous background in-situ and column integrated CO2 observations at Jungfraujoch with an urban site in the city of Bern
Schibig, Michael; Leuenberger, Markus; Nyfeler, Peter et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2014), 16

A six and a half year (January 2005 to May 2011) comparison of CO2 concentration observations has been performed at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland and the city of Bern using two different measurement ... [more ▼]

A six and a half year (January 2005 to May 2011) comparison of CO2 concentration observations has been performed at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland and the city of Bern using two different measurement techniques run by the University of Bern (UBE) and the University of Liege (UL). The UBE systems at Jungfraujoch and Bern are both combined systems for atmospheric oxygen and CO2 measurements. The cryogenically dried air is analysed for CO2 with a Maihak analyser based on the broad-band infrared absorption technique. The measurement frequency is every second but the final reported data are averages of six minute periods. UL is measuring the solar infrared spectrum since 1950 at Jungfraujoch. On its way through the atmosphere, the solar spectrum is modulated depending on the abundant gas species and their amount in the column. Since some gases like CO2 absorb the solar infrared radiation at particular wavelengths and the extinction is proportional to the gas concentration, it is possible to determine the gas concentration in the column above the sensor. At the conference, we will present the three observational records for the six and a half year period. The results show for all three records a distinct, but different seasonality. The seasonalities of the UL and UBE record at Jungfraujoch are lower than the seasonality in the city of Bern, i.e. 4.5 ppm per year and 9 ppm per year for the column and the in- situ record respectively, whereas the seasonality in the city of Bern is 31 ppm per year. Also the maxima and minima of the Jungfraujoch measurements are delayed by several weeks compared to the measurements in the city of Bern. The annual increase of the CO2 concentration of the UBE and UL records of Jungfraujoch are in good agreement with 1.94 ppm per year and 1.90 ppm per year, respectively. The annual increase of the CO2 concentration at the urban site is a bit higher at 2.01 ppm per year. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of ACE-FTS measurements of CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 using ground-based FTIRs
Kolonjari, F; Walker, K A; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg et al

Poster (2013, December 10)

Satellite data can be an effective global monitoring tool for long-lived compounds in the atmosphere. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission onboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The ... [more ▼]

Satellite data can be an effective global monitoring tool for long-lived compounds in the atmosphere. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission onboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) which is capable of measuring a range of gases including key chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) species. These families of species are of interest because of their significant contribution to anthropogenic ozone depletion and to global warming. To assess the quality of data derived from satellite measurements, validation using other data sources is critical. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTIRs) are particularly useful for this purpose. In this study, five FTIRs located at four sites around the world are used to validate the CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), and HCFC-22 (CHClF2) retrieved profiles from ACE-FTS measurements. These species are related because HCFC-22 was the primary replacement for CFC-11 and CFC-12 in refrigerant and propellant applications. The FTIRs used in this study record solar absorption spectra at Eureka (Canada), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Poker Flat (USA), and Toronto (Canada). The retrieval of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 are not standard products for many of these FTIRs, and as such, a harmonization of retrieval parameters between the sites has been conducted. The retrievals of these species from the FTIR spectra are sensitive from the surface to approximately 20 km, while the ACE-FTS profiles extend from 6 to 30 km. For each site, partial column comparisons between coincident measurements of the three species and a validation of the observed trends will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailParallel measurements of formaldehyde (H2CO) at the Jungfraujoch station: preliminary FTIR results and first comparison with Max-DOAS data
Franco, Bruno ULg; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Van Roozendael, Michel et al

Conference (2013, October 17)

In the framework of the NORS project, a retrieval strategy for formaldehyde (H2CO) is currently under development, using measurements from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar spectra recorded at the ... [more ▼]

In the framework of the NORS project, a retrieval strategy for formaldehyde (H2CO) is currently under development, using measurements from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar spectra recorded at the NDACC high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580m a.s.l.). According to the preliminary results, our FTIR retrieval strategy based on Tikhonov regularization has proven able to make an improvement in the process of fitting the H2CO feature within the 2833.070 – 2833.350 cm-1 microwindow from Jungfraujoch solar spectra, compared to a simple scaling. Furthermore, the retrieved total columns present a seasonal cycle averaged over 2005 – 2013 in agreement with preliminary results from UV-visible MAX-DOAS observations, ACE-FTS occultation measurements and simulations from the IMAGES and GEOS-CHEM models. However, FTIR H2CO abundances appear to be underestimated during summertime, with respect to the other data sets. In order to solve this issue, further experiments are planned. [less ▲]

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See detailOverview of the geophysical data derived from long-term FTIR monitoring activities at the Jungfraujoch NDACC site (46.5ºN) and the PYGCHEM project
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Bovy, Benoît ULg; Bader, Whitney ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 07)

We present an overview of the geophysical data deduced from long-term monitoring activities conducted at the Jungfraujoch station by the University of Liège. Typical results and trend investigations are ... [more ▼]

We present an overview of the geophysical data deduced from long-term monitoring activities conducted at the Jungfraujoch station by the University of Liège. Typical results and trend investigations are presented for hydrogen chloride (HCl) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). We further display and briefly describe time series for new target gases, namely methanol (CH3OH) and HCFC-142b. We also show some preliminary results for ammonia (NH3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Finally, we present the PyGChem project, a Python interface to the GEOS-Chem model currently under development at ULg. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetylene (C2H2) from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)
Duflot, V.; Hurtmans, D.; Clarisse, L. et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2013), 6

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetylene (C2H2) are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetylene (C2H2) are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric transport and chemistry. Because of their weak infrared absorption, overlapped by the CO2 Q branch near 720 cm−1, nadir sounders have up to now failed to measure these gases routinely. Taking into account CO2 line mixing, we provide for the first time extensive measurements of HCN and C2H2 total columns at Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E) and Jungfraujoch (46° N, 8° E) in 2009–2010 using observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). A first order comparison with local ground-based Fourier transform InfraRed (FTIR) measurements has been carried out allowing tests of seasonal consistency which is reasonably captured, except for HCN at Jungfraujoch. The IASI data shows a greater tendency to high C2H2 values. We also examine a nonspecific biomass burning plume over austral Africa and show that the emission ratios with respect to CO agree with previously reported values. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution of methanol (CH3OH) above the Jungfraujoch station (46.5°N) : Variability, seasonal modulation and long-term trend.
Bader, Whitney ULg; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Lejeune, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 09)

Methanol (CH3OH) is the second most abundant organic compound in the Earth’s atmosphere with concentrations close to a few ppbv, after methane, despite a short lifetime of a few days (Jacob et al., 2005 ... [more ▼]

Methanol (CH3OH) is the second most abundant organic compound in the Earth’s atmosphere with concentrations close to a few ppbv, after methane, despite a short lifetime of a few days (Jacob et al., 2005). Natural sources of CH3OH include plant growth, oceans, decomposition of plant matter, oxidation of methane and other VOCs,. . . while anthropogenic sources are from vehicles, industry,. . . biomass burning completes the emission budget. The main sink is the oxidation by hydroxyl radical, leading to the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (H2CO). The retrieval of methanol is very challenging due to the presence of strong absorption of ozone and its isotopologues in addition to water vapour and carbon dioxide in the region of the selected strong nu8 band of CH3OH. First retrievals from satellite observations using the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on board the SCISAT satellite have been performed by Dufour et al. (2007 and references therein) using a spectral interval going from 995.5 to 1008.3 cm-1. In 2009, first retrievals from a ground-based FTS, using spectra recorded at Kitt Peak (31.9°N) and a window going from 992 to 999 cm-1 have been reported by Rinsland et al. (2009), followed by Vigouroux et al. (2012 and references therein) who used yet another spectral interval going from 1029 to 1037cm-1. From those former retrieval strategies and also considering the Mahieu et al. (2012) contribution, we redefined our spectral intervals to maximize the information content. Indeed, our first window, starting from 992 to 1008.3 cm-1, is issued from the merge of Rinsland et al. and Dufour et al. windows while our second, going from 1029 to 1037 cm-1, is the one used by Vigouroux et al.With this new combination of windows, we were able to enlarge the range of zenith angles providing robust results while maintaining good correlation between our two windows; this also resulted in an improvement of the fitting residuals and of the information content. We used the 2008 HITRAN compilation (Rothman et al., 2009) for spectroscopic parameters. However, systematic residuals still remain in the 1033 cm-1 region which are attributed to unsatisfactory line parameters for methanol. New cross sections recorded at the Molecular Spectroscopy Facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Harrison et al. 2012) and calibrated in intensity by using the reference spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database will be tested as soon as converted into pseudolines. In this work, we will present the first long-term time series of methanol total columns, resulting from the implementation of our new retrieval strategy. All retrievals have been performed with the SFIT2 algorithm (v 3.91) (Rinsland et al., 1998) using a series of about 7 000 spectra recorded between 1995 and 2012, with zenith angles between 60 and 85°. These solar absorption observations have been recorded with a high-resolution FTIR Bruker 120HR instrument, at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of ground-based remote sensing and in-situ observations of CO, CH4 and O3, accounting for representativeness uncertainty
Henne, S.; Steinbacher, M.; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg et al

Conference (2013, April)

The EC project NORS (Demonstration Network Of ground-based Remote Sensing Observations in support of the GMES Atmospheric Service) aims at demonstrating the value of ground-based remote sensing data for ... [more ▼]

The EC project NORS (Demonstration Network Of ground-based Remote Sensing Observations in support of the GMES Atmospheric Service) aims at demonstrating the value of ground-based remote sensing data for quality assessment and improvement of the GMES products. As part of NORS CO, CH4, O3 and NO2 tropospheric products as obtained by ground-based remote sensing within the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) are compared to continuous surface in-situ measurements that are reported on common international reference scales within the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) Programme. However, a direct comparison between the different methods is hindered by different sampling volumes, introducing uncertainties due to representativeness. Here we present a novel method that utilises high-resolution, backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling to characterise the transport history of different sampling volumes. Sampling volumes are defined as infinitesimally small point volumes for the in-situ observations and as separate profile segments with horizontal and vertical extent for the remote sensing observations. The characterisation is then used (a) to filter times for which a direct comparison between in-situ and remote sensing data is unfavourable (large representativeness uncertainty) and (b) to construct vertical profiles from the in-situ observations, taking additional information from large scale atmospheric composition models into account. These so called “in-situ” profiles are supposed to be more comparable to the remote sensing profile as the surface value itself, while conserving the high accuracy information of the latter and projecting it onto the profile. Therefore, these profiles allow for a more direct comparison and validation of the remotely sensed profiles. The technique was first applied at two of the four NORS demonstration sites (Jungfraujoch, Switzerland and Izana, Spain) and to the comparison of remote sensing Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) measurements of CO, CH4, and O3 with the responding in-situ observations. While previous studies generally showed good agreement between the two kinds of observation, considerable amounts of scatter were evident. Selecting only situations with relatively small representativeness uncertainty reduces this scatter. Folding the “in-situ” profiles with the averaging kernels of the FTIR retrieval gives a more realistic comparison result that is not influenced by any a-priori assumptions. Results are also discussed with respect to season, time of day and weather type. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent trend anomaly of hydrogen chloride (HCl) at northern mid-latitudes derived from Jungfraujoch, HALOE and ACE-FTS Infrared solar observations
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Zander, Rodolphe ULg; Bernath, Peter F. et al

in Bernath, Peter F. (Ed.) The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE at 10: A Solar Occultation Anthology (2013)

In this contribution, we analyze infrared solar observations recorded from the ground at the Jungfraujoch station and from space with the HALOE and the ACE-FTS instruments to derive time series of ... [more ▼]

In this contribution, we analyze infrared solar observations recorded from the ground at the Jungfraujoch station and from space with the HALOE and the ACE-FTS instruments to derive time series of stratospheric columns of hydrogen chloride (HCl) at Northern mid-latitudes. We investigate the Jungfraujoch and the composite satellite time series to characterize the evolution of HCl over the last 15 years, i.e. after its peak loading which occurred in 1996 in this region of the Earth’s atmosphere. Trends derived from both data sets are compared and possible causes for the recent change in the stratospheric HCl buildup are evoked. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst retrievals of HCFC-142b from ground-based high resolution FTIR solar observations: application to high altitude Jungfraujoch spectra
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2013), 15

Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal ... [more ▼]

Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, HCFCs are on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) is presently the second most abundant HCFC, after HCFC-22 (CHClF2). It is used in a wide range of applications, including as a blowing foam agent, in refrigeration and air-conditioning. Its concentration will soon reach 25 ppt in the northern hemisphere, with mixing ratios increasing at about 1.1 ppt/yr [Montzka et al., 2011]. The HCFC-142b lifetime is estimated at 18 years. With a global warming potential of 2310 on a 100-yr horizon, this species is also a potent greenhouse gas [Forster et al., 2007]. First space-based retrievals of HCFC-142b have been reported by Dufour et al. [2005]. 17 occultations recorded in 2004 by the Canadian ACE-FTS instrument (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment – Fourier Transform Spectrometer, onboard SCISAT-1) were analyzed, using two microwindows (1132.5–1135.5 and 1191.5–1195.5 cm-1). In 2009, Rinsland et al. determined the HCFC-142b trend near the tropopause, from the analysis of ACE-FTS observations recorded over the 2004–2008 time period. The spectral region used in this study extended from 903 to 905.5 cm-1. In this contribution, we will present the first HCFC-142b measurements from ground-based high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar spectra. We use observations recorded at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), with a Bruker 120HR instrument, in the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). The retrieval of HCFC-142b is very challenging, with simulations indicating only weak absorptions, lower than 1% for low sun spectra and current concentrations. Among the four microwindows tested, the region extending from 900 to 906 cm-1 proved to be the most appropriate, with limited interferences, in particular from water vapor. A total column time series spanning the 2004-2012 time period will be presented, analyzed and critically discussed. After conversion of our total columns to concentrations, we will compare our results with in situ measurements performed in the northern hemisphere by the AGAGE network. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of IASI FORLI carbon monoxide retrievals using FTIR data from NDACC
Kerzenmacher, T; Dils, B; Kumps, N et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2012), 5

Carbon monoxide (CO) is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software developed at the Université Libre de ... [more ▼]

Carbon monoxide (CO) is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software developed at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The IASI CO total column product for 2008 from the most recent FORLI retrieval version (20100815) is evaluated using correlative CO profile products retrieved from groundbased solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations at the following FTIR spectrometer sites from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC): Ny-Alesund, Kiruna, Bremen, Jungfraujoch, Izana and Wollongong. In order to have good statistics for the comparisons, we included all IASI data from the same day, within a 100 km radius around the ground-based stations. The individual ground-based data were adjusted to the lowest altitude of the co-located IASI CO profiles. To account for the different vertical resolutions and sensitivities of the ground-based and satellite measurements, the averaging kernels associated with the various retrieved products have been used to properly smooth coincident data products. It has been found that the IASI CO total column products compare well on average with the co-located ground-based FTIR total columns at the selected NDACC sites and that there is no significant bias for the mean values at all stations. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing the losses of HCFC-22 using ACE-FTS measurements
Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K.A.; Boone, C.D. et al

Scientific conference (2012, November 09)

The annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic is primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer ... [more ▼]

The annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic is primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (with its subsequent amendments) restricts the emissions of ozone depleting substances. HCFC-22 has been the primary replacement for both CFC-11 and CFC-12, which has led to an increase in its atmospheric abundance. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a highresolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its wide spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring an extensive range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. The altitude distribution from the ACE-FTS profiles provides information that is complementary to the ground-based measurements that have been used to monitor these species. The ACE-FTS measurements compare well with surface in situ and balloon measurements. A preliminary validation of HCFC-22 using ground-based FTSs is discussed. The zonal mean distribution of HCFC-22 as observed by ACE-FTS is presented. The global distributions of HCFC-22 have been compared to the Global Modelling Initiative (GMI) Combined Stratospheric-Tropospheric Model, a chemistry and transport model. Large differences between the model and ACE-FTS measurements of HCFC-22 reveal issues with the boundary value mixing ratios. The comparison of stratospheric measurements with GMI suggest that there may be a missing loss process in the stratosphere, some issues with transport circulation and polar cap averaging in the current run, or a combination of the two processes. We propose the reaction of HCFC-22 with atomic chlorine as a potentially important loss process in the lowermost stratosphere and the lower stratosphere. [less ▲]

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