References of "MAGIS, Delphine"
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See detailLes migraines: des gènes à l'environnement
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 67(5-6), 349-358

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See detailNeurosurgery for headaches
MAGIS, Delphine ULg

Conference (2012, March)

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See detailNon invasive neurostimulation for headaches.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg

Conference (2012, March)

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See detailNeurostimulation dans l’algie vasculaire de la face.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; FONTAINE, Denys

Conference (2011, October)

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See detailCase report discussion.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg

Conference (2011, October)

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See detailSustained effeciveness of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Gerardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Headache (2011)

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See detailTeaching course: Pearls and pitfalls in headache electrophysiology
MAGIS, Delphine ULg

Conference (2011, June)

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See detailHabituation of evoked responses is greater in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine than in controls: a contrast with the common forms of migraine.
Hansen, Jacob Moller; Bolla, Monica; Magis, Delphine ULg et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2011)

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce ... [more ▼]

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce the FHM phenotype. The mutated FHM genes code for ion transport proteins that animal and cellular studies have associated with disturbed ion homeostasis, altered cellular excitability, neurotransmitter release, and decreased threshold for cortical spreading depression. The common forms of migraine are characterized interictally by a habituation deficit of cortical and subcortical evoked responses that has been attributed to neuronal dysexcitability. FHM and the common forms of migraine are thought to belong to a spectrum of migraine phenotypes with similar pathophysiology, and we therefore examined whether an abnormal habituation pattern would also be found in FHM patients. Methods: In a group of genotyped FHM patients (five FHM-1, four FHM-2), we measured habituation of visual evoked potentials (VEP), auditory evoked potentials including intensity dependence (IDAP), the nociception-specific blink reflex (nsBR) and compared the results to a group of healthy volunteers (HV). Results: FHM patients had a more pronounced habituation during VEP (P = 0.025) and nsBR recordings (P = 0.023) than HV. There was no difference for IDAP, but the slope tended to be steeper in FHM. Conclusion: Contrary to the common forms of migraine, FHM patients are not characterized by a deficient, but rather by an increased habituation in cortical/brain stem evoked activities. These results suggest differences between FHM and the common forms of migraine, as far as central neuronal processing is concerned. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurostimulation therapy in intractable headaches
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Allena, M; MAGIS, Delphine ULg

in Nappi; Moskowitz (Eds.) Handbook of Clinical Neurology (2011)

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See detailTreatment of migraine: update on new therapies.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2011)

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a comprehensive selection of the latest clinical trial results in antimigraine treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: The oral calcitonine gene-related peptide antagonist ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a comprehensive selection of the latest clinical trial results in antimigraine treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: The oral calcitonine gene-related peptide antagonist telcagepant is efficacious in acute treatment. Compared to triptans, its efficacy is almost comparable but its tolerance is superior. The same is true for the 5HT-1F agonist lasmiditan, another agent devoid of vascular effects. Triptans, as other drugs, are more efficient if taken early but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics remain useful for acute treatment, according to several meta-analyses. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation during the aura rendered more patients pain-free (39%) than sham stimulation (22%) in one study. Topiramate could be effective for migrainous vertigo, but it did not prevent transformation to chronic migraine in patients with high attack frequency. Onabotulinumtoxin A was effective for chronic migraine and well tolerated, but the therapeutic gain over placebo was modest; the clinical profile of responders remains to be determined before widespread use. Occipital nerve stimulation was effective in intractable chronic migraine with 39% of responders compared to 6% after sham stimulation. This and other neuromodulation techniques, such as sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, are promising treatments for medically refractory patients but large controlled trials are necessary. One study suggests that outcome of patent foramen ovale closure in migraine might depend on anatomic and functional characteristics. SUMMARY: Drugs with a better efficacy or side-effect profile than triptans may soon become available for acute treatment. The future may also look brighter for some of the very disabled chronic migraineurs thanks to novel drug and neuromodulation therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailLa neurostimulation : quelle place dans les céphalées réfractaires?
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; SCHOENEN, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(2), 85-90

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See detailPeripheral nerve stimulation in chronic cluster headache.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Progress in Neurological Surgery (2011), 24

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments ... [more ▼]

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments, various invasive and sometimes mutilating procedures have been tempted in the last decades. Recently, neurostimulation methods have raised new hope for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. The main focus of this chapter is on stimulation of the great occipital nerve, which has been the best evaluated peripheral nerve stimulation technique in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache, providing the most convincing results so far. Other peripheral nerve stimulation approaches used for this indication are also reviewed in detail. Although available studies are limited to a relatively small number of patients and placebo-controlled trials are lacking, existent clinical data suggest that occipital nerve stimulation should nonetheless be recommended for intractable chronic cluster headache patients before more invasive deep brain stimulation surgery. More studies are needed to evaluate the usefulness of supraorbital nerve stimulation and of vagus nerve stimulation in management of cluster headaches. [less ▲]

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See detailThe California Verbal Learning Test and other standard clinical neuropsychological tests to predict conversion from mild memory impairment to dementia.
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Marique, Patricia et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2010), 20

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See detailSustained efficacy of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache after up to 5 years treatment
Magis, Delphine ULg; Gérardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010), 11(Suppl 1), 15

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study ... [more ▼]

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study of great occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in 8 drCCH patients showed encouraging results at 15 months (1). Methods. We recruited 15 patients with drCCH according to the previously published criteria of intractability (2). They were implanted with suboccipital stimulators on the side of their headache. Long-term follow-up was achieved by questionnaires administered during a headache consultation and/or by telephone interviews. Results. One patient had an immediate post operative infection of the material. Mean time with ONS was 28.8 months (range 3-60 months). Nine of the 14 remaining patients were totally pain-free (64%), 2 patients had an improvement in frequency exceeding 90% and one patient a 89% amelioration. Two patients did not respond or described mild improvement. Intensity of residual attacks was not improved by ONS. Four patients (29%) were able to reduce their prophylaxis. Common technical problems were battery depletion (N=8/14, 57%) and material infection (N=3/15, 20%). Recurrent battery replacement (until 2/ year in one patient) is now avoided by the availability of rechargeable batteries. Clinical peculiarities associated with ONS were occurrence of infrequent contralateral attacks (N=5/14, 36%), and/or isolated ispilateral autonomic attacks (N=5/14, 36%). Rapid attack recurrence after stimulator switch off was reported by 7/12 improved patients (58%). Two patients found ONS-related paresthesias unbearable; one had his stimulator removed, the other switched it off though he was objectively ameliorated. Subjectively, nine patients are very satisfied by ONS and one patient moderately satisfied. Conclusions. Our long-term follow-up confirms the efficacy of ONS in drCCH, which remains a safe and well-tolerated technique. The occurrence of contralateral attacks and isolated autonomic attacks in nearly 50% of ONS responders may have therapeutic and pathophysiological implications. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral neuromodulation in cluster headache patients treated with occipital nerve stimulators: A PET study
Magis, Delphine ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Fumal, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2010), 110(Suppl 1), 17

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. BACKGROUND: Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) provides relief to about 60% of patients suffering from drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH). Its mode of action, however, remains elusive, but the long latency to meaningful effect suggests that ONS induces slow neuromodulation. METHODS: Ten drCCH patients underwent an 18FDG-PET scan after ONS durations varying between 0 and 30 months. All were scanned with ongoing ONS (ON) and with the stimulator switched OFF. RESULTS: After 6-30 months of ONS, 3 patients were pain free and 4 had a ≥ 90% reduction of attack frequency (responders). In patients overall compared to controls, several areas of the pain matrix were hypermetabolic: ipsilateral hypothalamus, midbrain and ipsilateral lower pons. All normalized after ONS, except the hypothalamus. Switching ON or OFF the stimulator had little influence on brain glucose metabolism. The perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) was hyperactive in ONS responders compared to non-responders. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic normalization in the pain neuromatrix and lack of short-term changes induced by the stimulation support the hypothesis that ONS acts in drCCH through slow neuromodulatory processes. Selective activation in responders of PACC, a pivotal structure in the endogenous opioid system, suggests that ONS may restore balance within dysfunctioning pain control centres. That ONS is nothing but a symptomatic treatment might be illustrated by the persistent hypothalamic hypermetabolism which could explain why autonomic attacks may persist despite pain relief and why cluster attacks recur shortly after stimulator arrest. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurostimulation therapy in intractable headaches.
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Allena, Marta; Magis, Delphine ULg

in Handbook of clinical neurology / edited by P.J. Vinken and G.W. Bruyn (2010), 97

A proportion of chronic headache patients become refractory to medical treatment and severely disabled. In such patients various neurostimulation methods have been proposed, ranging from invasive ... [more ▼]

A proportion of chronic headache patients become refractory to medical treatment and severely disabled. In such patients various neurostimulation methods have been proposed, ranging from invasive procedures such as deep-brain stimulation to minimally invasive ones like occipital nerve stimulation. They have been applied in single cases or small series of patients affected with varying headache disorders: cervicogenic headache, hemicrania continua, posttraumatic headache, chronic migraine, and cluster headache. Although favorable results were reported overall, it is premature to consider neurostimulation as a treatment with established utility in refractory headaches. At present, the most detailed clinical studies have been performed in intractable chronic cluster headache (iCCH) patients, who represent about 1% of all chronic cluster headache (CCH) patients. Various lesional interventions have been attempted in these patients, none with lasting benefits. In recent years, non-destructive neurostimulation methods have raised new hope. Hypothalamic deep-brain stimulation (hDBS) acts rapidly and has lasting efficacy, but is not without risk. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) was studied in two trials on a total of 17 iCCH patients. Clinical efficacy was found to be very satisfactory by most patients and by the investigators. Although slightly less efficacious than hDBS, ONS has the advantage of being rather harmless and reversible. At this stage, it should be preferred as first-line invasive therapy for iCCH. Recent case reports mention the efficacy of supraorbital (SNS) and vagal (VNS) nerve stimulation. Whether these neurostimulation methods have a place in the management of iCCH patients remains to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailMigraine - clinical neurophysiology.
Ambrosini, Anna; Magis, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Nappi, G.; Moskowitz, M. (Eds.) Headache (2010)

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and ... [more ▼]

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and even peripheral structures (e.g., trigeminal ganglion and nerve). As it is particularly suited to functional evaluation of various components of the nervous system, neurophysiological testing has become a valuable tool for investigating migraine pathophysiology and the effects of pharmacological treatment. However it has limited value for migraine diagnosis because of a high interindividual variability. In this chapter, we critically review and summarize the available published literature on neurophysiological approaches in migraine, i.e., electroencephalography, evoked and event-related potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromyography, and cerebellar testing. The most relevant techniques for understanding migraine pathophysiological mechanisms are highlighted. [less ▲]

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