References of "Luxen, André"
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See detailBrain response to one's own name in vegetative state, minimally conscious state and locked-in syndrome
Perrin, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Schabus, M. et al

in Archives of Neurology (2006), 63

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See detailSynthesis of protected meso-diaminopimelic acid.
Teller, N.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2005, October 10)

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See detailSynthesis of anhydro-muranic acid derivatives as substrates for MurNAc amidase.
Mercier, F.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2005, October 10)

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See detailExploring the unity and diversity of the neural substrates of executive functioning
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2005), 25(4), 409-423

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating ... [more ▼]

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating executive functions. Consequently, the aim of this study was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to reexamine by conjunction and interaction paradigms the cerebral areas associated with three executive processes (updating, shifting, and inhibition). Three conjunction analyses allowed us to isolate the cerebral areas common to tasks selected to tap into the same executive process. A global conjunction analysis demonstrated that foci of activation common to all tasks were observed in the right intraparietal sulcus, the left superior parietal gyrus, and at a lower statistical threshold, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. These regions thus seem to play a general role in executive functioning. The right intraparietal sulcus seems to play a role in selective attention to relevant stimuli and in suppression of irrelevant information. The left superior parietal region is involved in amodal switching/integration processes. One hypothesis regarding the functional role of the lateral prefrontal cortex is that monitoring and temporal organization of cognitive processes are necessary to carry out ongoing tasks. Finally, interaction analyses showed that specific prefrontal cerebral areas were associated with each executive process. The results of this neuro-imaging study are in agreement with cognitive studies demonstrating that executive functioning is characterized by both unity and diversity of processes. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of both prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex in dual-task performance
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Olivier, L.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Brain Research (2005), 24(2), 237-251

This PET study explored the neural substrate of both dual-task management and integration task using single tasks that are known not to evoke any prefrontal activation. The paradigm included two simple ... [more ▼]

This PET study explored the neural substrate of both dual-task management and integration task using single tasks that are known not to evoke any prefrontal activation. The paradigm included two simple (visual and auditory) discrimination tasks, a dual task and an integration task (requiring simultaneous visual and auditory discrimination), and baseline tasks (passive viewing and hearing). Data were analyzed using SPM99. As predicted, the comparison of each single task to the baseline task showed no activity in prefrontal areas. The comparison of the dual task to the single tasks demonstrated left-sided foci of activity in the frontal gyrus (BA 9/46, BA 10/47 and BA 6), inferior parietal gyrus (BA 40), and cerebellum. By reference to previous neuroimaging studies, BA 9/46 was associated with the coordinated manipulation of simultaneously presented information, BA 10/47 with selection processes, BA 6 with articulatory rehearsal, and BA 40 with attentional shifting. Globally similar regions were found for the integration task, except that the inferior parietal gyrus was not recruited. These results confirm the hypothesis that the left prefrontal cortex is implicated in dual-task performance. Moreover, the involvement of a parietal area in the dual task is in keeping with the hypothesis that a parieto-frontal network sustains executive functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-referential reflective activity and its relationship with rest : a PET study
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 25(2), 616-624

This study used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the brain substrate of self-referential reflective activity and to investigate its relationship with brain areas that are active during the ... [more ▼]

This study used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the brain substrate of self-referential reflective activity and to investigate its relationship with brain areas that are active during the resting state. Thirteen healthy volunteers performed reflective tasks pertaining to three different matters (the self, another person, and social issues) while they were scanned. Rest scans were also acquired, in which subjects were asked to simply relax and not think in a systematic way. The mental activity experienced during each scan was assessed with rating scales. The results showed that, although self-referential thoughts were most frequent during the self-referential task, some self-referential reflective activity also occurred during rest. Compared to rest, performing the reflective tasks was associated with increased blood flow in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the left anterior middle temporal gyros, the temporal pole bilaterally, and the right cerebellum; there was a decrease of blood flow in right prefrontal regions,and in medial and right lateral parietal regions. In addition, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) (1) was more active during the self-referential reflective task than during the other two reflective tasks, (2) showed common activation during rest and the self-referential task, and (3) showed a correlation between cerebral metabolism and the amount of self-referential processing. It is suggested that the VMPFC is crucial for representing knowledge pertaining to the self and that this is an important function of the resting state. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of brain activity during phonological familiarization
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Brain & Language (2005), 92(3), 320-331

We measured brain activity in 12 adults for the repetition of auditorily presented words and nonwords, before and after repeated exposure to their phonological form. The nonword phoneme combinations were ... [more ▼]

We measured brain activity in 12 adults for the repetition of auditorily presented words and nonwords, before and after repeated exposure to their phonological form. The nonword phoneme combinations were either of high (HF) or low (LF) phonotactic frequency. After familiarization, we observed, for both word and nonword conditions, decreased activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus, in the bilateral temporal pole and middle temporal gyri. At the same time, interaction analysis showed that the magnitude of decrease of activity in bilateral posterior temporal lobe was significantly smaller for LF nonwords, relative to words and HF nonwords. Decrease of activity in this area also correlated with the size of behavioral familiarization effects for LF nonwords. The results show that the posterior superior temporal gyrus plays a fundamental role during phonological learning. Its relationship to sublexical and lexical phonological processing as well as to phonological short-term memory is discussed. (c) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of a Non-Image-Forming Response to Light Exposure During the Daytime: a fMRI Study
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Moreau, V et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailA Prominent Role for Amygdaloïd Complexes in the Variability of Heart Rate during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thanh; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural correlates of fast and slow ocular sequence learning
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Ruby, Perrine; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name : A combined ERPs and PET study
Perrin, Fabien; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2005), 43(1), 12-19

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present ... [more ▼]

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present study, we combined ERPs and PET scan methods to explore the cerebral mechanisms underlying the detection of our own name. While categorical analyses of PET data failed to reveal significant results, we found that the amplitude of the P3 component, elicited when hearing one's own name, correlates with regional cerebral blood changes in right superior temporal sulcus, precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the latter was more correlated to the P3 obtained for the subject's name compared to that obtained for other first names. These results suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex plays the most prominent role in self-processing. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation of an n-alkylated benzylamine derivative from Pseudomonas putida BTP1 as elicitor of induced systemic resistance in bean
Ongena, MARC ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Schafer, M. et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions (2005), 18(6), 562-569

Root treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida BTP1 led to significant reduction of the disease caused by the pathogen Botrytis cinerea on leaves. The molecular determinant ... [more ▼]

Root treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida BTP1 led to significant reduction of the disease caused by the pathogen Botrytis cinerea on leaves. The molecular determinant of P putida BTP1 mainly responsible for the induced systemic resistance (ISR) was isolated from cell-free culture fluid after growth of the strain in the iron-poor casamino acid medium. Mass spectrometry analyses performed on both the bacterial product and synthetic analogues revealed a polyalkylated benzylamine structure, with the quaternary ammonium substituted by methyl, ethyl, and C-13 aliphatic groups responsible for the relative hydrophobicity of the molecule. The specific involvement of the N-alkylated benzylamine derivative (NABD) in ISR elicitation was first evidenced by testing the purified compound that mimicked the protective effect afforded by crude supernatant samples. The evidence was supported by the loss of elicitor activity of mutants impaired in NABD biosynthesis. Our experiments also showed that other iron-regulated metabolites secreted by the strain are not involved in ISR stimulation. Thus, these results indicate a wider variety of Pseudomonas determinants for ISR than reported to date. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiochemical Synthesis of OCH2F-[18F]MPPF a New Analogue of p-[18F]MPPF for the Study of 5-HT1A Receptors.
Defraiteur, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Luxen, André ULg et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

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See detailEx Vivo Evaluation of p-[18F]D-MPPF for the Study of 5-HT1A Receptors.
Defraiteur, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Luxen, André ULg et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

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See detailNew Methods For Halogenation of [18F]Fluorinated Benzyl Derivatives.
Kech, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Brichard, L. et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)