References of "Losson, Bertrand"
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See detailLes Culicoides, importants vecteurs de maladies du bétail
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Diverse speeche and writing (2012)

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See detailRotenoid content and in vitro acaricidal activity of Tephrosia vogelii leaf extract on the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus
Kalume; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2012), 190(1-2), 204-209

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See detailFoci report on indigenous Dermacentor reticulatus populations in Belgium and a preliminary study of associated babesiosis pathogens.
Cochez, C.; Lempereur, Laetitia ULg; Madder, Maxime et al

in Medical and Veterinary Entomology (2012), 26(3), 355-358

The occurrence of autochthonous clinical cases of canine and equine babesiosis in Belgium during the last two decades suggests that the vector of the pathogens responsible for these diseases, Dermacentor ... [more ▼]

The occurrence of autochthonous clinical cases of canine and equine babesiosis in Belgium during the last two decades suggests that the vector of the pathogens responsible for these diseases, Dermacentor reticulatus (Ixodida: Ixodidae), may be present in this country. Consequently, evidence for the presence of this tick species in different locations within Belgium was investigated. Four different locations were monitored by flagging in 2010; these included the locations at which D. reticulatus was previously found on a dog in 2009 and on two red deer in 2007. Two different species of tick were identified, Ixodes ricinus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) and D. reticulatus. A total of 282 D. reticulatus adult ticks (98 males, 184 females) were collected from the four sites. Ticks were found mainly from early March until the end of May and a peak in activity was apparent in March. A Babesia spp. (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae) genus-specific polymerase chain reaction test based on the amplification of a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene was used to investigate the potential presence of Babesia spp. All DNA extracts isolated from the total tick samples yielded negative results. Additional studies to accurately determine the distribution and vectorial capacity of this important tick species in Belgium are warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailWild Cervids Are Host for Tick Vectors of Babesia Species with Zoonotic Capability in Belgium
Lempereur, Laetitia ULg; Wirtgen, Marc ULg; Nahayo, Adrien ULg et al

in Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases (2012), 12(4), 275-280

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See detailLongitudinal field study on bovine Babesia spp. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum infections during a grazing season in Belgium.
Lempereur, Laetitia; Lebrun, Maude; Cuvelier, Pascale et al

in Parasitology Research (2012), 110(4), 1525-30

Anaplasmosis and babesiosis are major tick-borne diseases with a high economic impact but are also a public health concern. Blood samples collected in the spring, summer, and autumn of 2010 from 65 cows ... [more ▼]

Anaplasmosis and babesiosis are major tick-borne diseases with a high economic impact but are also a public health concern. Blood samples collected in the spring, summer, and autumn of 2010 from 65 cows in seven different farms in Belgium were monitored with an indirect immunofluorescence antibody test to assess seroprevalence against these pathogens. Seroprevalences to Babesia spp. were measured as 10.7%, 20%, and 12.3% in spring, summer, and autumn, respectively, whereas seroprevalences to Anaplasma phagocytophilum were 30.8%, 77%, and 56.9%, respectively. A total of 805 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected at the same time from both cattle (feeding ticks) and grazed pastures (questing ticks). The infection level of ticks, assessed by PCR assay, for Babesia spp. DNA was 14.6% and 7.9% in feeding and questing ticks, respectively, whereas 21.7% and 3% of feeding and questing ticks were found be positive for A. phagocytophilum cDNA. Fifty-five PCR-positive samples were identified by sequencing as Babesia sp. EU1, of which five from feeding ticks were positive for both A. phagocytophilum and Babesia sp. EU1. The high density of wild cervids in the study area could explain these observations, as deer are considered to be the main hosts for adults of I. ricinus. However, the absence of Babesia divergens both in feeding and questing ticks is surprising, as the study area is known to be endemic for cattle babesiosis. Increasing cervid populations and comorbidity could play an import role in the epidemiology of these tick-borne diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailAn optimized DNA extraction and multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola sp. in lymnaeid snails.
Caron, Yannick ULg; Righi, Souad; Lempereur, Laetitia et al

Poster (2011, June 10)

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See detailAn optimized DNA extraction and multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola sp. in lymnaeid snails
Caron, Yannick ULg; Righi, Souad; Lempereur, Laetitia et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2011), 178((1-2)), 93-9

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See detailTreatment of a case of trichurosis (Trichuris suis) in pigs
Caron, Yannick ULg; Delleur, Valery; De Bock, Bart et al

Poster (2011, May)

Trichuris suis infection was identified in a pig herd during an investigation into persistent diarrhea and weight loss in 10 recently introduced gilts. Eggs of the parasite were identified in faeces of ... [more ▼]

Trichuris suis infection was identified in a pig herd during an investigation into persistent diarrhea and weight loss in 10 recently introduced gilts. Eggs of the parasite were identified in faeces of gilts. Further investigations failed to detect other causes of diarrhea but, in all production stages, they allowed the detection of eggs of Trichuris suis that could explain pasty faeces sometimes observed in weaned sows and frequent diarrhea found in the early fattening period. The administration of levamisole (intramuscular injection) to gilts allowed the excretion of adult parasites, the treatment of diarrhea and the reduction of the number of eggs per gram of faeces. Taking into account the success obtained with levamisole in gilts, the equipment of the farm and the wish of the farmer no to inject finishing pigs, an unsuccessful treatment was tried based on levamisole in drinking water every 8 and then 5 weeks. Flubendazole was finally administrated in drinking water every 3 and then 5 weeks, reducing significantly the number of eggs per gram of faeces. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding sites of Bluetongue virus vectors in Belgian cowshed
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

Conference (2011, April 13)

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See detailFirst Molecular Evidence of Potentially Zoonotic Babesia microti and Babesia sp. EU1 in Ixodes ricinus Ticks in Belgium
Lempereur, Laetitia ULg; De Cat, Ann; Caron, Yannick ULg et al

in Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases (2011), 11(2), 125-30

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See detailNeospora caninum is associated with abortion in algerian cattle
Ghalmi, F; China, B; Kaidi, R et al

in Journal of Parasitology (The) (2011), 97(6), 1121-1124

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See detailDetection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Dermacentor reticulatus ticks
Wirtgen, Marc ULg; Nahayo, A.; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2011), 168(9), 248

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See detailPigeon circovirus: baculovirus expression of the capsid protein gene, specific antibody and viral load measured by real time polymerase chain reaction
Duchatel, Jean-Pierre ULg; Todd, D.; Smyth, J. et al

in Israel Journal of Veterinary Medicine (2011), 66(1), 26-31

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