References of "Leprince, Pierre"
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See detailNestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells by releasing active BMP4.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Bruyere, Françoise ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2004), 5

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much interest as potential treatment for patients with CNS lesions. Several types of cells have been considered as candidates for such cell transplantation and replacement therapies. Foetal brain tissue has already been shown to have significant effects in patients with Parkinson's disease. Clinical use of the foetal brain tissue is, however, limited by ethical and technical problems as it requires high numbers of grafted foetal cells and immunosuppression. Alternatively, several reports suggested that mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from adult bone marrow, are multipotent cells and could be used in autograft approach for replacement therapies. RESULTS: In this study, we addressed the question of the possible influence of mesenchymal stem cells on neural stem cell fate. We have previously reported that adult rat mesenchymal stem cells are able to express nestin in defined culture conditions (in the absence of serum and after 25 cell population doublings) and we report here that nestin-positive (but not nestin-negative) mesenchymal stem cells are able to favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells cultivated from embryonic striatum. The increase of the number of GFAP-positive cells is associated with a significant decrease of the number of Tuj1- and O4-positive cells. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells express LIF, CNTF, BMP2 and BMP4 mRNAs, four cytokines known to play a role in astroglial fate decision. In this model, BMP4 is responsible for the astroglial stimulation and oligodendroglial inhibition, as 1) this cytokine is present in a biologically-active form only in nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium and 2) anti-BMP4 antibodies inhibit the nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium inducing effect on astrogliogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: When thinking carefully about mesenchymal stem cells as candidates for cellular therapy in neurological diseases, their effects on resident neural cell fate have to be considered. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal localization of the 25-kDa specific thiamine triphosphatase in rodent brain
Czerniecki, Jan ULg; Chanas, Grazyna; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2004), 125(4), 833-840

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of certain proteins; this may be part of a new signal transduction pathway. We have recently characterized a highly specific 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) that is expressed in most mammalian tissues. The role of this enzyme may be the control of intracellular concentrations of ThTP. As the latter has been considered to be a neuroactive form of thiamine, we have studied the distribution of ThTPase mRNA and protein in rodent brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. With both methods, we found the strongest staining in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, as well as cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells. Some interneurons were also labeled and many ThTPase mRNA-positive and immunoreactive cells were distributed throughout cerebral cortical gray matter and the thalamus. White matter was not significantly labeled. ThTPase immunoreactivity seems to be located mainly in the cytoplasm of neuronal perikarya. Immunocytochemical data using dissociated cultured cells from hippocampal and cerebellum showed that the staining was more intense in neurons than in astrocytes. The protein was rather uniformly located in the perikarya and dendrites, suggesting that ThTP and ThTPase may play a general role in neuronal metabolism rather than a specific role in excitability. There was no apparent correlation between ThTPase expression and selective vulnerability of certain brain regions to thiamine deficiency. (C) 2004 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailReelin signaling directly affects radial glia morphology and biochemical maturation
Hartfuss, Eva; Forster, Eckart; Bock, Hans H. et al

in Development (2003), 130(19), 4597-4609

Radial glial cells are characterized, besides their astroglial properties, by long radial processes extending from the ventricular zone to the pial surface, a crucial feature for the radial migration of ... [more ▼]

Radial glial cells are characterized, besides their astroglial properties, by long radial processes extending from the ventricular zone to the pial surface, a crucial feature for the radial migration of neurons. The molecular signals that regulate this characteristic morphology, however, are largely unknown. We show an important role of the secreted molecule reelin for the establishment of radial glia processes. We describe a significant reduction in ventricular zone cells with long radial processes in the absence of reelin in the cortex of reeler mutant mice. These defects were correlated to a decrease in the content of brain lipid-binding protein (Blbp) and were detected exclusively in the cerebral cortex, but not in the basal ganglia of reeler mice. Conversely, reelin addition in vitro increased the Blbp content and process extension of radial glia from the cortex, but not the basal ganglia. Isolation of radial glia by fluorescent-activated cell sorting showed that these effects are due to direct signaling of reelin to radial glial cells. We could further demonstrate that this signaling requires Dab1, as the increase in Blbp upon reelin addition failed to occur in Dab1(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results unravel a novel role of reelin signaling to radial glial cells that is crucial for the regulation of their Blbp content and characteristic morphology in a region-specific manner. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalization and photoaffinity labelling of the levetiracetam binding site in rat brain and certain cell lines
Fuks, Bruno; Gillard, Michel; Michel, Philippe et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2003), 478(1), 11-19

Levetiracetam (2S-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)butanamide, KEPPRA(R)), a novel antiepileptic drug, has been shown to bind to a specific binding site located in the brain (Eur. J. Pharmacol. 286 (1995) 137). To ... [more ▼]

Levetiracetam (2S-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)butanamide, KEPPRA(R)), a novel antiepileptic drug, has been shown to bind to a specific binding site located in the brain (Eur. J. Pharmacol. 286 (1995) 137). To identify the protein constituent of the levetiracetam binding site in situ, we synthesized the photoaffinity label [H-3]ucb 30889 ((2S)-2-[4-(3-azidophenyl)-2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl]butanamide), a levetiracetam analog with higher affinity for the levetiracetam binding site. This radioligand was used to map the levetiracetam binding site within the brain and to study its cellular and subcellular distribution. Autoradiography experiments using [H-3]ucb 30889 in rat brain revealed a unique distribution profile that did not match that of classical receptors known to be involved in the generation of epileptic seizures. There was a high level of binding in the dentate gyrus, the superior colliculus, several thalamic nuclei, the molecular layer of the cerebellum and to a lesser extent in the cerebral cortex, the striatum and the hypothalamus. The levetiracetam binding site was restricted to neuronal cell types, undifferentiated PC 12 cells and was highly enriched in synaptic vesicles. [H-3]ucb 30889 was also used in photoaffinity labelling studies and shown to bind covalently to a membrane protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of neural markers nestin and GFAP expression by cultivated bone marrow stromal cells.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Cell Science (2003), 116(Pt 16), 3295-302

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cells, i.e. neural cells under ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cells, i.e. neural cells under appropriate in vivo experimental conditions (Kopen et al., 1999; Brazelton et al., 2000; Mezey et al., 2000). This neural phenotypic plasticity allows us to consider the utilization of mesenchymal stem cells as cellular material in regenerative medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that cultured adult rat stromal cells can express nestin, an intermediate filament protein predominantly expressed by neural stem cells. Two factors contribute to the regulation of nestin expression by rat stromal cells: serum in the culture medium inhibits nestin expression and a threshold number of passages must be reached below which nestin expression does not occur. Only nestin-positive rat stromal cells are able to form spheres when they are placed in the culture conditions used for neural stem cells. Likewise, only nestin-positive stromal cells are able to differentiate into GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive cells when they are co-cultivated with neural stem cells. We thus demonstrated that adult rat stromal cells in culture express nestin in absence of serum after passaging the cells at least ten times, and we suggest that nestin expression by these cells might be a prerequisite for the acquisition of the capacity to progress towards the neural lineage. [less ▲]

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See detailThe anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam reverses the inhibition by negative allosteric modulators of neuronal GABA- and glycine-gated currents
Rigo, Jean-Michel; Hans, Grégory ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg et al

in British Journal of Pharmacology (2002), 136(5), 659-672

1 In this study in vitro and in vivo approaches were combined in order to investigate if the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra(R)) may involve modulation of inhibitory ... [more ▼]

1 In this study in vitro and in vivo approaches were combined in order to investigate if the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra(R)) may involve modulation of inhibitory neurotransmission. 2 GABA- and glycine-gated currents were studied in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques applied on cultured cerebellar granule, hippocampal and spinal neurons. Protection against clonic convulsions was assessed in vivo in sound-susceptible mice. The effect of LEV was compared with reference anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs): carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, clonazepam, phenobarbital and ethosuximide. 3 LEV contrasted the reference AEDs by an absence of any direct effect on glycine-gated currents. At high concentrations, beyond therapeutic relevance, it induced a small reduction in the peak amplitude and a prolongation of the decay phase of GABA-gated currents. A similar action on GABA-elicited currents was observed with the reference AEDs, except ethosuximide. 4 These minor direct effects contrasted with a potent ability of LEV (EC50 = 1-10 muM) to reverse the inhibitory effects of the negative allosteric modulators zinc and beta-carbolines on both GABA(A) and glycine receptor-mediated responses. 5 Clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate showed a similar ability to reverse the inhibition of beta-carbolines on GABA-gated currents. Blockade of zinc inhibition of GABA responses was observed with clonazepam and ethosuximide. Phenytoin was the only AED together with LEV that inhibited the antagonism of zinc on glycine-gated currents and only clonazepam and phenobarbital inhibited the action of DMCM. 6 LEV (17 mg kg(-1)) produced a potent suppression of sound-induced clonic convulsions in mice. This protective effect was significantly abolished by co-administration of the beta-carboline FG 7142, from a dose of 5 mg kg(-1). In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (up to 10 mg kg(-1)) was without any effect on the protection afforded by LEV. 7 The results of the present study suggest that a novel ability to oppose the action of negative modulators on the two main inhibitory ionotropic receptors may be of relevance for the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of LEV. [less ▲]

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See detailNestin expression in cultivated mesenchymal stem cells: Regulation and potential role in their neural differentiation
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Glia (2002, May), (Suppl. 1), 87

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte, fibroblast and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cell, i.e. neural ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow stromal cells can differentiate into many types of mesenchymal cells, i.e. osteocyte, chondrocyte, fibroblast and adipocyte, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cell, i.e. neural cells in appropriate in vivo experimental conditions (Kopen and al.,PNAS,96, 10711,1999, Brazelton and al, Science, 290,1175, 2000, Mezey and al, Science, 290,1179, 2000). In neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, auto-transplantation of neural cell types derived from mesenchymal stem cells offers the potential of replacing lost cells and recovering lost functions. Nestin is an intermediate filament protein predominantly expressed by neural stem cells and is used to identify neural progenitor. In this study, we demonstrate that cultured rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSC) can express nestin in appropriate conditions. Two factors contribute to the regulation of nestin expression by rMSC : 1) the presence of serum-derived components in the culture medium which repress nestin expression and 2) the cell’s number of passages. LPA and thrombin mimic this serum effect. Furthermore, when nestin- positive cells are trypsinized and resuspended into culture conditions used for neural stem cells (NSC), sphere formation is observed. Likewise, by co-cultivating nestin-positive rMSC with NSC derived from green mouse, heterogenous spheres were obtained. When those heterogenous spheres are placed on polyornithine-coated surfaces, a differentiation of some rMSC into GFAP-positive cells occurs. These results indicate that nestin expression might be a pre-requisite for the acquisition by rMSC of the capacity to differentiate into some neural cell types. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurotransmitters as Early Signals for Central Nervous System Development
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Rocher, Véronique et al

in Cell & Tissue Research (2001), 305(2), 187-202

During brain ontogenesis, the temporal and spatial generation of the different types of neuronal and glial cells from precursors occurs as a sequence of successive progenitor stages whose proliferation ... [more ▼]

During brain ontogenesis, the temporal and spatial generation of the different types of neuronal and glial cells from precursors occurs as a sequence of successive progenitor stages whose proliferation, survival and cell-fate choice are controlled by environmental and cellular regulatory molecules. Neurotransmitters belong to the chemical microenvironment of neural cells, even at the earliest stages of brain development. It is now established that specific neurotransmitter receptors are present on progenitor cells of the developing central nervous system and could play, during neural development, a role that has remained unsuspected until recently. The present review focuses on the occurrence of neurotransmitters and their corresponding ligand-gated ion channel receptors in immature cells, including neural stem cells of specific embryonic and neonatal brain regions. We summarize in vitro and in vivo data arguing that neurotransmitters could regulate morphogenetic events such as proliferation, growth, migration, differentiation and survival of neural precursor cells. The understanding of neurotransmitter function during early neural maturation could lead to the development of pharmacological tools aimed at improving adult brain repair strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of Radial Glia Phenotype
Leprince, Pierre ULg; Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna

Part of book (2001)

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See detailNeuregulin signaling regulates neural precursor growth and the generation of oligodendrocytes in vitro
Calaora, Viviane; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Bismuth, Karen et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2001), 21

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See detailA 295-Kda Intermediate Filament-Associated Protein in Radial Glia and Developing Muscle Cells in Vivo and in Vitro
Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna; Thiry, Marc ULg; Pirard, Sandrine et al

in Developmental Dynamics : An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists (2000), 219(4), 514-25

The RC2 antibody is frequently used to label mouse radial glial cells in all parts of the nervous system where neuronal migration occurs during embryonic and early postnatal life. The antigen recognized ... [more ▼]

The RC2 antibody is frequently used to label mouse radial glial cells in all parts of the nervous system where neuronal migration occurs during embryonic and early postnatal life. The antigen recognized by this antibody still needs to be identified. We have characterized further its localization in vivo, its expression and subcellular localization in vitro, as well as its molecular nature. Histologic investigations of whole mouse embryos reveal an equally intense expression of RC2 immunostaining in radial glial cells in brain and spinal cord and in skeletal muscle. In glial cells cultures, the RC2 antibody recognizes an epitope located on the glial cytoskeleton and identified as an intermediate filament associated protein (IFAP) at the ultrastructural level. RC2 immunostaining in those cells is strongly dependent on the presence of a serum-derived activity. Serum-removal causes a decrease of the staining while adding serum back to the cells induces reexpression of RC2 immunoreactivity. By Western blotting, we find that in intermediate filament (IF) preparations obtained from cultured cerebellar glia, the RC2 antibody recognizes a 295-kDa protein whose expression is also dependent on the presence of serum in culture medium. In developing muscle cells, RC2 immunostaining is observed from the myoblast stage and disappears after complete myotube fusion. Both in vivo and in vitro, staining is first seen as a loose capping around myoblasts nuclei and progressively concentrates into Z-disks in association with the muscle IF protein desmin. The RC2 antibody also recognizes a 295-kDa protein band in muscle tissue protein extracts. Thus, the RC2 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated cytoskeletal protein that is expressed, like other previously identified IFAPs, by cells of the glial and myogenic lineages and whose expression in vitro seems to be controlled by a signaling mechanism known to modulate astroglial morphology. [less ▲]

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See detailRadial Glia Phenotype: Origin, Regulation, and Transdifferentiation
Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (2000), 61(4), 357-63

Radial glial cells play a major guidance role for migrating neurons during central nervous system (CNS) histogenesis but also play many other crucial roles in early brain development. Being among the ... [more ▼]

Radial glial cells play a major guidance role for migrating neurons during central nervous system (CNS) histogenesis but also play many other crucial roles in early brain development. Being among the earliest cells to differentiate in the early CNS, they provide support for neuronal migration during embryonic brain development; provide instructive and neurotrophic signals required for the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neurons; and may be multipotential progenitor cells that give rise to various cell types, including neurons. Radial glial cells constitute a major cell type of the developing brain in numerous nonmammalian and mammalian vertebrates, increasing in complexity in parallel with the organization of the nervous tissue they help to build. In mammalian species, these cells transdifferentiate into astrocytes when neuronal migration is completed, whereas, in nonmammalian species, they persist into adulthood as a radial component of astroglia. Thus, our perception of radial glia may have to change from that of path-defining cells to that of specialized precursor cells transiently fulfilling a guidance role during brain histogenesis. In that respect, their apparent change of phenotype from radial fiber to astrocyte probably constitutes one of the most common transdifferentiation events in mammalian development. [less ▲]

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See detailGlycine Triggers an Intracellular Calcium Influx in Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Which Is Mediated by the Activation of Both the Ionotropic Glycine Receptor and Na+-Dependent Transporters
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Rigo, Jean-Michel et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2000), 12(6), 1924-30

Using fluo-3 calcium imaging, we demonstrate that glycine induces an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cortical oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cells. This effect results from a ... [more ▼]

Using fluo-3 calcium imaging, we demonstrate that glycine induces an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cortical oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cells. This effect results from a calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC), as it is observed only in OP cells expressing such channels, and it is abolished either by removal of calcium from the extracellular medium or by application of an L-type VGCC blocker. Glycine-triggered Ca2+ influx in OP cells actually results from an initial depolarization that is the consequence of the activation of both the ionotropic glycine receptor (GlyR) and Na+-dependent transporters, most probably the glycine transporters 1 (GLYT1) and/or 2 (GLYT2) which are colocalized in these cells. Through this GlyR- and transporter-mediated effect on OP intrcellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i, glycine released by neurons may, as well as other neurotransmitters, serve as a signal between neurons and OP during development. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of Psf, the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Associated Splicing Factor, as a Developmentally Regulated Neuronal Protein
Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna; Mazy-Servais, Cécile; Wattiez, Ruddy et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1999), 57(1), 62-73

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing ... [more ▼]

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing mouse brain. The sequence of a fragment of mouse PSF was found to be remarkably similar to that of human PSF. Both the expression of PSF mRNA in cortex and cerebellum and PSF immunoreactivity in all brain areas were high during embryonic and early postnatal life and almost disappeared in adult tissue, except in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb where various neuronal populations remained PSF-immunopositive. Double-labeling experiments with anti-PSF antibody and anti-neurofilaments or anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies on sections of cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum indicate that PSF is expressed by differentiating neurons but not by astrocytic cells. In vitro, mouse PSF was found to be expressed by differentiating cortical and cerebellar neurons. Radial glia or astrocyte nuclei were not immunopositive; however, oligodendrocytes differentiating in vitro were found to express PSF. The restricted expression of PSF suggests that this splicing factor could be involved in the control of neuronal-specific splicing events occurring at particular stages of neuronal differentiation and maturation. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Macrophage Transplantation in the Injured Adult Rat Spinal Cord: A Combined Immunocytochemical and Biochemical Study
Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1998), 51(3), 316-27

Early and robust invasion by macrophages may be one of the reasons why axonal regeneration is more effective in the PNS than in the CNS. Therefore, we have grafted autologous peritoneal macrophages ... [more ▼]

Early and robust invasion by macrophages may be one of the reasons why axonal regeneration is more effective in the PNS than in the CNS. Therefore, we have grafted autologous peritoneal macrophages labeled with fluorescent latex microspheres into spinal cord compression lesions. At various survival times, we have studied their effect on the expression of neuronal (neurofilaments [NF], calcitonin gene-related peptide [CGRP], 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and nonneuronal markers (myelin-associated glycoprotein [MAG], glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], laminin) by using semiquantitative Western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. After 1 month, we observed a significant decrease of the expression of MAG as well as an important invasion of the lesion site by neurites, chiefly peptidergic axons of presumed dorsal root origin, in macrophage-grafted animals compared with controls. In addition, angiogenesis and Schwann cell infiltration were more pronounced after macrophage grafts, providing an increase in laminin, a favorable substrate for axonal regrowth. By using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNAs for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were detected in the transplanted cells, whereas results were negative for nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Thus, macrophage grafts may represent an interesting strategy to promote axonal regeneration in the CNS. Our study suggests that they may exert their beneficial effects by degrading myelin products, which inhibit axonal regrowth, and by promoting a permissive extracellular matrix containing notably laminin. No evidence for a direct synthesis of neurotrophic factors by the transplanted macrophages was found in this study, but resident glial cells could secrete such factors as a result of stimulation by macrophage-released cytokines. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel biodegradable and biocompatible ceramer prepared by the sol-gel process
Tian, Dong; Dubois, Philippe ULg; Grandfils, Christian ULg et al

in Chemistry of Materials (1997), 9(4), 871-874

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See detailProtein Kinase- and Staurosporine-Dependent Induction of Neurite Outgrowth and Plasminogen Activator Activity in Pc12 Cells
Leprince, Pierre ULg; Bonvoisin, Catherine ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (1996), 52(9), 1399-405

We analysed how interactions between protein kinase-dependent intracellular signalling pathways were implicated in the control of the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the ... [more ▼]

We analysed how interactions between protein kinase-dependent intracellular signalling pathways were implicated in the control of the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the generation of neurite outgrowth by PC12 cells. To that aim, cells were treated with agents that interact with the trk receptor and with protein kinases A and C. Nerve growth factor induced only the formation of large neurites. The release of the protease and the production of short neurite outgrowth were found to be protein-kinase-A-dependent events that could be enhanced by simultaneous activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester. At high concentration, staurosporine, a nonselective inhibitor of protein kinases, induced the production of short neurites and mimicked the protein-kinase-A-dependent effect on tPA release. Such a response was not observed with K-252a, an analogue of staurosporine devoid of neurite-outgrowth-promoting activity. The responses to protein kinase A stimulation and the addition of staurosporine, although similar, seemed to occur through an activation of distinct, yet interacting, signalling pathways. In conclusion, tPA release and large neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells are controlled by parallel, albeit interacting, pathways, suggesting that these two potentially antagonistic events in PC12 cell differentiation can be modulated in a concerted way or independently of each other, depending on the activity of several protein kinases. [less ▲]

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