References of "Leprince, Pierre"
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See detailTritrophic interactions among Macrosiphum euphorbiae aphids, their host plants and endosymbionts: investigation by a proteomic approach.
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Guillonneau, F.; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Physiology (2010), 56(6), 575-85

The Mi-1.2 gene in tomato confers resistance against certain clones of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). This study used 2D-DIGE coupled with protein identification by MALDI-TOF-MS to compare the ... [more ▼]

The Mi-1.2 gene in tomato confers resistance against certain clones of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). This study used 2D-DIGE coupled with protein identification by MALDI-TOF-MS to compare the proteome patterns of avirulent and semivirulent potato aphids and their bacterial endosymbionts on resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) tomato lines. Avirulent aphids had low survival on resistant plants, whereas the semivirulent clone could colonize these plants. Eighty-two protein spots showed significant quantitative differences among the four treatment groups, and of these, 48 could be assigned putative identities. Numerous structural proteins and enzymes associated with primary metabolism were more abundant in the semivirulent than in the avirulent aphid clone. Several proteins were also up-regulated in semivirulent aphids when they were transferred from susceptible to resistant plants. Nearly 25% of the differentially regulated proteins originated from aphid endosymbionts and not the aphid itself. Six were assigned to the primary endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola, and 5 appeared to be derived from a Rickettsia-like secondary symbiont. These results indicate that symbiont expression patterns differ between aphid clones with differing levels of virulence, and are influenced by the aphids' host plant. Potentially, symbionts may contribute to differential adaptation of aphids to host plant resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic comparison of High and Low responders to eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Abstract book du Colloque de la Société Belge des Neurosciences (2009, May)

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See detailCourbatures après exercice excentrique : High et Low responders ?
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Croisier, Jean-Louis; Codine, Philippe (Eds.) Exercice musculaire excentrique (2009)

It is well known that novel and/or unusual exercise consisting of lengthening muscle contractions (eccentric exercise) results in muscle damage. Muscle damage can be assessed via measures of indirect ... [more ▼]

It is well known that novel and/or unusual exercise consisting of lengthening muscle contractions (eccentric exercise) results in muscle damage. Muscle damage can be assessed via measures of indirect markers such as isometric strength, range of motion, blood levels of muscle-specific proteins and muscle soreness. It has been shown that changes in these markers present a large inter-subject variability. Especially, the seric CK response to exercise is largely documented and some authors introduced the notion of High and Low responders to define subjects with exaggerated and light or moderate response to eccentric protocol, respectively. The reasons for the various susceptibility to eccentric exercise are not understood but it seems to be influenced by several factors including genetical, morphological, physiological or training elements. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the large inter-subject variability in responses to eccentric exercise and in this context, a proteomic approach could be interesting to highlight protein expression differences between High and Low responders. [less ▲]

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See detailDOMS : traiter ou prévenir ?
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Croisier, Jean-Louis; Codine, Philippe (Eds.) Exercice musculaire excentrique (2009)

The evidence of benefits from eccentric contraction provides compelling rationale for their inclusion in force training and in the reeducation of various locomotor pathologies (i.e., tendinopathies or ... [more ▼]

The evidence of benefits from eccentric contraction provides compelling rationale for their inclusion in force training and in the reeducation of various locomotor pathologies (i.e., tendinopathies or muscular imbalance). However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise frequently leads to muscle damage associated with prolonged loss in muscle strength and range of motion, a dramatic increase in muscle proteins circulating in blood and the development of muscle soreness. These negative functional consequences, referred to as Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), often disturb the progress of training or reeducation programmes. In an attempt to attenuate signs and symptoms of DOMS, several approaches have been used prophylactically and/or therapeutically. This article focuses on some of the most commonly used modalities, including the nutritionnal and pharmacological strategies, clinical therapies and exercise. Despite a large number of studies, there is little evidence indicating any benefit at the perfomance level of these various approaches. Conversely, there is unequivocal evidence that a bout of eccentric exercise is followed by protection against skeletal muscle damage associated with a subsequent bout of potentially damaging exercise for several weeks to several months. To date, specific submaximal training appears the most efficient prophylactic measure and is recommended to alleviate the prejudiciable consequences associated with DOMS in the athletic or therapeutic programs. Despite the volume of data concerning this protective effect, often called the “repeated bout effect”, the underlying mechanisms of such an adaptation are not fully understood and a better knowledge of these adaptative mechanisms could provide better guidelines for prevention or treatment practice. [less ▲]

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See detailThe proapoptotic C16-ceramide-dependent pathway requires the death-promoting factor Btf in colon adenocarcinoma cells.
Renert, Anne-Francoise; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Dieu, Marc et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2009), 8(10), 4810-22

Ceramides are central molecules in sphingolipid metabolism. They are involved in the regulation of cancer-cell growth, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. To better understand how these secondary ... [more ▼]

Ceramides are central molecules in sphingolipid metabolism. They are involved in the regulation of cancer-cell growth, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. To better understand how these secondary messengers induce their biological effects, adenocarcinoma cells (HCT116) were treated with exogenous long-chain ceramides (C16-ceramide) in order to mimic endogenous sphingolipids. This treatment induced a decrease of cell viability partly due to apoptosis as shown by PARP cleavage and a decrease of pro-caspase 3. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) revealed the differential expression of 51 proteins in response to C16-ceramide. These proteins are notably involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein transport and transcriptional regulation. Among them, the cell death-promoting factor Btf was found to be implicated in the apoptotic signal triggered by ceramide. In adenocarcinoma cells, Btf regulates apoptosis related proteins such as Mdm2, p53, BAX and pBcl-2 and thus plays an important role in the ceramide mediated cell death. These findings bring new insight into the proapoptotic ceramide-dependent signaling pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailProtein synthesis and folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures.
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailProtein synthesis and folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures.
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailThe cold-adapted trigger factor from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis.
D'Amico, Salvino; Piette, Florence; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailInterest of a comparative proteomic approach to unravel the aetiology of DOMS in humans
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Wang, François-Charles ULg et al

in Acta Physiologica Scandinavica. Supplementum (2008), 194(suppl 666), -09

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See detailProteomic changes in rat hippocampus and adrenals following short-term sleep deprivation.
Poirrier, Jean-Etienne; Guillonneau, Francois; Renaut, Jenny et al

in Proteome Science (2008), 6

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To identify the biochemical changes induced by sleep deprivation at a proteomic level, we compared the hippocampal proteome of rats either after 4 hours of sleep or sleep deprivation ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To identify the biochemical changes induced by sleep deprivation at a proteomic level, we compared the hippocampal proteome of rats either after 4 hours of sleep or sleep deprivation obtained by gentle handling. Because sleep deprivation might induce some stress, we also analyzed proteomic changes in rat adrenals in the same conditions. After sleep deprivation, proteins from both tissues were extracted and subjected to 2D-DIGE analysis followed by protein identification through mass spectrometry and database search. RESULTS: In the hippocampus, 87 spots showed significant variation between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance in the latter case. Of these, 16 proteins were present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 12 identified proteins, inferred affected cellular functions include cell metabolism, energy pathways, transport and vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton and protein processing. Although we did not observe classical, macroscopic effect of stress in sleep-deprived rats, 47 protein spots showed significant variation in adrenal tissue between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance following sleep. Of these, 16 proteins were also present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 13 identified proteins, the most relevant cellular function that was affected was cell metabolism. CONCLUSION: At a proteomic level, short term sleep deprivation is characterized by a higher expression of some proteins in the hippocampus and a lower abundance of other proteins in the adrenals (compared to normal sleep control). Altogether, this could indicate a general activation of a number of cellular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of wakefulness and in increased energy expenditure during sleep deprivation. These findings are relevant to suggested functions of sleep like energy repletion and the restoration of molecular stocks or a more global homeostasis of synaptic processes. [less ▲]

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See detailLeukemia inhibitory factor induces an antiapoptotic response in oligodendrocytes through Akt-phosphorylation and up-regulation of 14-3-3.
Slaets, Helena; Dumont, Debora; Vanderlocht, Joris et al

in Proteomics (2008), 8(6), 1237-47

Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) promotes the survival of oligodendrocytes (OLG) both in vitro and in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that LIF protects mature rat OLG cultures ... [more ▼]

Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) promotes the survival of oligodendrocytes (OLG) both in vitro and in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that LIF protects mature rat OLG cultures selectively against the combined insult of the proinflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but it does not protect against oxidative stress nor against staurosporine induced apoptosis. We further demonstrate that LIF activates the janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt pathway in mature OLG. We show that LIF protection is independent of suppressors of cytokine signaling and Bcl-2 mRNA expression levels. To gain further insight into the protective mechanism, a quantitative proteomic approach (DIGE) was applied to identify differentially expressed proteins in LIF-treated OLG. Our results indicate that LIF induces a shift in the cellular machinery toward a prosurvival execution program, illustrated by an enhanced expression of isoforms of the antiapoptotic molecule 14-3-3. These data provide further insight into the mechanisms of LIF-mediated protection of mature OLGs. [less ▲]

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See detailLiaison autoroutière « CHB » : la Wallonie s’empêtre dans des choix dépassés
Lamarche, Caroline; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Outers, Jean-Luc et al

Article for general public (2007)

Magnétique, l'affiche mobilisatrice pour la marche « Ensemble pour le climat et la solidarité » de ce 8 décembre à Bruxelles, ces humains nus convergeant vers notre planète à protéger. Superbe symbole qui ... [more ▼]

Magnétique, l'affiche mobilisatrice pour la marche « Ensemble pour le climat et la solidarité » de ce 8 décembre à Bruxelles, ces humains nus convergeant vers notre planète à protéger. Superbe symbole qui ne doit pas nous faire oublier l'avertissement placé en tête d'affiche : « Ça commence ici ». « Ici », on nous le répète, c'est ma maison où je peux fermer le robinet, visser des ampoules économiques, baisser le chauffage, placer du double vitrage. Mais il y a un autre « ici » : notre beau coin d'Europe, nos villes et nos campagnes. Et là, pour Noël, le gouvernement wallon s'apprête à déposer un énorme cadeau dans nos petits souliers. Un truc neuf ? Non, vieux de presque un demi-siècle. Pas trop crade ? De luxe au contraire : 400 millions d'euros. Au moment de la conférence de Bali sur le changement climatique, ça a à voir avec le climat ? Mais oui ! Et c'est… ? Un permis de construire. Des canaux, des voies ferrées, des trams ? Non. Une nouvelle autoroute. [...] [less ▲]

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See detailMitoproteome plasticity of rat brown adipocytes in response to cold acclimation
Navet, Rachel ULg; Mathy, Grégory ULg; Douette, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2007), 6(1), 25-33

Cold acclimation induces an adaptative increase in respiration in brown adipose tissue (BAT). A comparative analysis by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis of mitochondrial protein ... [more ▼]

Cold acclimation induces an adaptative increase in respiration in brown adipose tissue (BAT). A comparative analysis by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis of mitochondrial protein patterns found in rat control and cold-acclimated BAT was performed. A total of 58 proteins exhibiting significant differences in their abundance was unambiguously identified. Proteins implicated in the major catabolic pathways were up-regulated as were ATP synthase and mitofilin. Moreover, these results support the fact that adipocytes can balance their ATP synthesis and their heat production linked to UCP1-sustained uncoupling. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of nestin expression by thrombin and cell density in cultures of bone mesenchymal stem cells and radial glial cells.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; wautier, Franz; Chanas, Grazyna et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2007), 8

BACKGROUND: Bone marrow stromal cells and radial glia are two stem cell types with neural phenotypic plasticity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into osteocytes, chondrocytes and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Bone marrow stromal cells and radial glia are two stem cell types with neural phenotypic plasticity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes, but can also differentiate into non-mesenchymal cell, i.e. neural cells in appropriate in vivo and in vitro experimental conditions. Likewise, radial glial cells are the progenitors of many neurons in the developing cortex, but can also generate astrocytes. Both cell types express nestin, an intermediate filament protein which is the hallmark of neural precursors. RESULTS: In this study, we demonstrate that thrombin, a multifunctional serine protease, stimulates the growth of radial glial cells (RG) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a dose-dependent manner. In RG, the mitogenic effect of thrombin is correlated with increased expression of nestin but in MSCs, this mitogenic effect is associated with nestin down-regulation. Both cell types express the PAR-1 type receptor for Thrombin and the effect of Thrombin on both cell types can be mimicked by its analogue TRAP-6 activating specifically this receptor subtype or by serum which contains various amount of thrombin. Moreover, we also demonstrate that serum deprivation-induced expression of nestin in MSCs is inhibited by high cell density (> 50,000 cells/cm2). CONCLUSION: This work shows that thrombin stimulates the growth of both RG and MSCs and that nestin expression by MSCs and RG is regulated in opposite manner by thrombin in vitro. Thrombin effect is thus associated in both cell types with a proliferating, undifferentiated state but in RG this involves the induction of nestin expression, a marker of immaturity for neural progenitors. In MSCs however, nestin expression, as it corresponds to a progression from the mesenchymal "undifferentiated", proliferating phenotype toward acquisition of a neural fate, is inhibited by the mitogenic signal. [less ▲]

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See detailSaccharomyces cerevisiae mitoproteome plasticity in response to recombinant alternative ubiquinol oxidase
Mathy, Grégory ULg; Navet, Rachel ULg; Gerkens, Pascal et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2006), 5(2), 339-348

The energy-dissipating alternative oxidase (AOX) from Hansenula anomala, was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant AOX was functional. A comparative analysis by two-dimensional ... [more ▼]

The energy-dissipating alternative oxidase (AOX) from Hansenula anomala, was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant AOX was functional. A comparative analysis by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) of mitochondrial protein patterns found in wild-type and recombinant AOX strains was performed. 60 proteins exhibiting a significant difference in their abundance were identified. Interestingly, proteins implicated in major metabolic pathways such as Krebs cycle and amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated. Surprisingly, an up-regulation of the respiratory-chain complex III was associated with a down-regulation of the ATP synthase complex. [less ▲]

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See detailUncoupling protein 1 affects the yeast mitoproteome and oxygen free radical production
Douette, Pierre ULg; Gerkens, Pascal; Navet, Rachel ULg et al

in Free Radical Biology & Medicine (2006), 40(2), 303-315

Uncoupling protein I (UCP1) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that dissipates the proton electrochemical gradient built up by the respiratory chain. its activity is stimulated by free fatty acids ... [more ▼]

Uncoupling protein I (UCP1) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that dissipates the proton electrochemical gradient built up by the respiratory chain. its activity is stimulated by free fatty acids and inhibited by purine nucleotides. Here we investigated how active and regulated recombinant UCP1 expressed in yeast at similar to 1 and similar to 10 mu g/mg of total mitochondrial proteins induced changes in the mitochondrial proteome and in oxygen free radical production. Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we found that most of the proteins involved in the response to ectopically expressed UCP1 are related to energy metabolism. We also quantified the cellular H2O2 release in the absence or in the presence of UCP1. Our results suggest that UCP1 has a dual influence on free radical generation. On one side, FFA-activated UCP1 was able to decrease the superoxide anion production, demonstrating that a decrease in the generation of reactive oxygen species is an obligatory outcome of UCP1 activity even in a heterologous context. On the other side, an increase in UCP1 content was concomitant with an increase in the basal release of superoxide anion by mitochondria as a side consequence of the overall increase in oxidative metabolism. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures.
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures
D'Amico, Salvino; Piette, Florence; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)