References of "Lepoivre, Philippe"
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See detailCombination of Genomic and Proteomic Approaches to Characterize the Symbiotic Population of the Banana Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Massart, Sébastien ULg et al

in Environmental Entomology (2014)

Aphids are known to live in symbiosis with speciÞc bacteria called endosymbionts that have positive or negative impacts on their hosts. In this study, six banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel ... [more ▼]

Aphids are known to live in symbiosis with speciÞc bacteria called endosymbionts that have positive or negative impacts on their hosts. In this study, six banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel) strains from various geographical origins (Gabon, Madagascar, and Burundi) were screened to determine their symbiotic content, using complementary genomic (16S rDNA sequencing and speciÞc polymerase chain reaction) and proteomic (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis coupled with protein identiÞcation by matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-ßight mass spectrometry) approaches. Despite the geographical heterogeneity, the combined methods allowed us to identify the same two symbionts in the six aphids strains tested: Buchnera aphidicola and Wolbachia. Although B. aphidicola is found in almost all aphid species, the systematic presence of Wolbachia in banana aphids is particularly interesting, as this bacterium usually has a low prevalence in aphid species. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Wolbachia sp. strain found in P. nigronervosa was very similar to the strain present in aphids of the genus Cinara, known to have developed a strong and long-term symbiotic association with Wolbachia. The high level of asexual reproduction in P. nigronervosa could be linked to the presence of Wolbachia, but its prevalence also suggests that this symbiotic bacterium could play a more essential role in its aphid host. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst report of banana mild mosaic virus infecting plantain in Ivory Coast
Kouadio, Kouakou Théodore ULg; Agneroh, Thérèse Atcham; De Clerck, Caroline ULg et al

in Plant Disease (2013), 97(5), 693

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See detailDevelopment of a test to assess the Banana Bunchy Top Virus transmissibility through direct analysis of its aphid vector Pentalonia nigronervosa
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013), 78(1), 49-54

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See detailThe susceptibility of bananas to crown rot disease is influenced by geographical and seasonal effects
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology = Revue Canadienne de Phytopathologie (2013), 35(1), 27-36

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of ... [more ▼]

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of banana fruits to crown rot is influenced by many pre-harvest factors. The aim of this study was to improve on the methodology for the evaluation of fruit susceptibility and to verify whether cultivation areas in Cameroon as well as seasonal variations have an influence on the susceptibility to crown rot. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated on a monthly basis throughout a year (including the dry and rainy seasons) in three banana plantations located at very different agro-ecological conditions (two in a lowland area and one in a highland area). Fruit susceptibility was determined through an internal necrotic surface (INS) assessment after artificial inoculation with C. musae. The standardization of post-inoculation environmental conditions enabled more reliable INS assessments. Fruit susceptibility was found to be significantly influenced by cultivation area (P<0.001) since fruits grown in low altitude (Dia-dia, Koumba, 80 m) were more susceptible than fruits grown in high altitude (Ekona, 500 m). Although no seasonal effect was observed (P=0.075), there was a highly significant date effect (P<0.001). This was specifically the case in low altitude plantations where fruit susceptibility was higher for some harvest dates within the rainy season. In Ekona, fruit grade and number of leaves on the banana plant were found to be significantly higher than in the two other locations, while black leaf streak disease severity was significantly lower. The potential relationship with fruit susceptibility is fully discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe susceptibility of bananas to crown rot disease is influenced by geographical and seasonal effects
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology = Revue Canadienne de Phytopathologie (2013), 35(1), 27-36

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of ... [more ▼]

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of banana fruits to crown rot is influenced by many pre-harvest factors. The aim of this study was to improve on the methodology for the evaluation of fruit susceptibility and to verify whether cultivation areas in Cameroon as well as seasonal variations have an influence on the susceptibility to crown rot. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated on a monthly basis throughout a year (including the dry and rainy seasons) in three banana plantations located at very different agro-ecological conditions (two in a lowland area and one in a highland area). Fruit susceptibility was determined through an internal necrotic surface (INS) assessment after artificial inoculation with C. musae. The standardization of post-inoculation environmental conditions enabled more reliable INS assessments. Fruit susceptibility was found to be significantly influenced by cultivation area (P<0.001) since fruits grown in low altitude (Dia-dia, Koumba, 80 m) were more susceptible than fruits grown in high altitude (Ekona, 500 m). Although no seasonal effect was observed (P=0.075), there was a highly significant date effect (P<0.001). This was specifically the case in low altitude plantations where fruit susceptibility was higher for some harvest dates within the rainy season. In Ekona, fruit grade and number of leaves on the banana plant were found to be significantly higher than in the two other locations, while black leaf streak disease severity was significantly lower. The potential relationship with fruit susceptibility is fully discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of satellite RNAs in cucumber mosaic virus-host plant interactions. A review
Kouadio, Kouakou Théodore ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Agneroh, Thérèse Atcham et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2013), 17(4), 644-650

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See detailThermotherapy, chemotherapy and meristem culture in banana
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Van den Houwe, Ines et al

in Lambardi, M.; Ozudogru, A. E.; Jain, S. M. (Eds.) Protocols for micropropagation of selected economically-important horticultural plants (2013)

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See detailImpact of the extension of black leaf streak disease on banana susceptibility to post-harvest diseases
Ewané, Cécile Annie; Chillet, Marc; Castelan, Florence et al

in Fruits (2013), 68(5), 351-365

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See detailLittérature scientifique et formation à l'information, la situation des bioingénieurs à Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (ULg).
Pochet, Bernard ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Thirion, Paul ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2013), 17(1),

This article is written from a doctoral work on the role of scientific literature in the bioengineers' teaching at Gembloux. It is essentially a summary including recent advances in information literacy ... [more ▼]

This article is written from a doctoral work on the role of scientific literature in the bioengineers' teaching at Gembloux. It is essentially a summary including recent advances in information literacy. Data analysis indicates that the bioengineers working at Gembloux publish at least as much as other scientists in Belgium, they preferentially publish articles in journals with impact factor, they read preferentially articles and they use all electronic resources available to them. Their fields of research, and reading, goes beyond the strict sense of agronomy. The courses provided at Gembloux are based on the concept of information literacy. It describes a set of skills that allow individuals to recognize an information need and enable them to locate, valuate and use needed information. The Information Literacy concept has evolved over the last two decades. Information literacy education is going well beyond the library. The skills involved are also social and cultural skills besides intellectual skills. They include media and new information technologies without being reduced to technical or technological skills. At Gembloux, the information literacy education, is registered in student's schedule, integrates production of scientific papers and is based on a methodological approach and his own didactic and specific contents. [less ▲]

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See detailBanana macropropagation: an alternative way of producing seedlings for the farmers in Burundi
Nintije, Pierre ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Bigirimana, Joseph et al

Poster (2012, May 22)

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See detailModels to predict the combined effects of temperature and relative humidity on Pectobacterium Atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. Carotovorum population density and soft rot disease development at the surface of wounded potato tubers
Moh, Augustin; Massart, Sébastien ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Plant Pathology [=JPP] (2012), 94(1), 181-191

The main objectives of this study were to evaluate and model the influence of temperature (10, 15 and 20°C), relative humidity (86, 96 and 100%) and initial concentration of bacterial inoculum (105, 107 ... [more ▼]

The main objectives of this study were to evaluate and model the influence of temperature (10, 15 and 20°C), relative humidity (86, 96 and 100%) and initial concentration of bacterial inoculum (105, 107 et 109 CFU ml-1) on the population density of Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc) which are important potato pathogens in temperate climates, and on the development of soft rot symptoms caused by these bacteria at the surface of wounded potatoes tubers under controlled conditions. Experiments were carried out according to a Box-Behnken experimental design, simplifying prediction of the combined effects of three controlled factors. With both bacterial species, statistical analysis showed a significant effect of temperature, relative humidity and initially applied bacterial concentration on population dynamics and soft rot development at the surface of wounded potato tubers. Multiple regression analyses and the contour plots showed that the temperature is the most important factor, followed by the initially applied bacteria concentration and relative humidity. More than 64% of the variability of the soft rot symptoms observed could be explained by the presence of Pba and Pcc at the level of wounded potato tubers under the combined effect of tested factors. The quadratic polynomial models developed in our research should integrate the heterogeneity of tested bacteria belonging to the same species (which was not evaluated in this preliminary investigation) in further research. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of phenolic compounds in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. A review.
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(3), 393-404

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See detailDevelopment and application of a microplate method to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. M.A. Curtis) Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens of fruits
Kouassi, Kouadio Hugues Sosthène ULg; Bajji, M.; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(3), 325-336

A microbioassay was developed for evaluating the in vitro antifungal activity of 30 preselected essential oils. A template based on 10 serial dilutions with eight replicates per dilution arranged on two ... [more ▼]

A microbioassay was developed for evaluating the in vitro antifungal activity of 30 preselected essential oils. A template based on 10 serial dilutions with eight replicates per dilution arranged on two 96-well ELISA plates was used as a reproducible and standardized design to identify the in vitro effectiveness of these essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. M.A. Curtis) Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens, on fruits. Growth of mycelium was monitored by measuring optical density (492 nm). Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cinnamomum verum and Eugenia caryophyllus were found to be still active against all the three pathogens even at 100 ppm. Compared to other methods, this microbioassay proved to be a rapid, reproducible, and efficient method for testing the efficacy of essential oils that inhibit spore germination in P. italicum, P. digitatum and C. musea. The assay requires relatively small amounts of essential oils. [less ▲]

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