References of "Lekeux, Pierre"
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See detailLa contre-performance du cheval de CSO – une cause médicale
Van Erck, E.; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in 36èmes Journées AVEF (2008)

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See detailEvaluation clinique et cytologique de l’inflammation chez des chevaux atteints de maladie inflammatoire des petites voies respiratoires
Richard, E.; Fortier, G.; Dupuis, M. C. et al

in Proceedings: 36èmes Journées AVEF (2008)

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See detailEquine respiratory diseases
Lekeux, Pierre ULg

Book published by International Veterinary Information Service - Last Updated 2008 (2008)

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See detailEffects of exercise and oral antioxidant supplementation enriched in (n-3) fatty acids on blood oxidant markers and erythrocyte membrane fluidity in horses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Portier, Karine; Kirschvink, Nathalie et al

in Veterinary Journal (2007), 174(1), 113-121

The aim of this study was to investigate in a placebo-controlled field study the effect of a (n - 3)-vitamin supplementation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity (ENIF), oxidant/antioxidant markers and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate in a placebo-controlled field study the effect of a (n - 3)-vitamin supplementation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity (ENIF), oxidant/antioxidant markers and plasmatic omega 3/omega 6 fatty acid ratio (FAR) in 12 eventing horses. Venous blood was sampled at rest before (PRE) and after (POST) a three week treatment period with either the supplement (group S, n = 6) or a placebo (group P, n = 6) as well as after 15 min (POST E15') and 24 h (POST E24h) after a standardised exercise test. The following markers were analysed: EMF, plasma antioxidant capacity of water and lipid soluble components, ascorbic acid, uric acid (UA), glutathione (reduced: GSH, oxidised: GSSG), vitamin E (Vit E), beta-carotene, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, selenium, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), oxidised proteins (Protox), lipid peroxides (Pool) and FAR. EMF did not differ between group S and P after treatment, but GPx remained unchanged in group S whereas it decreased in group P and plasma Cu/Zn ratio remained unchanged whereas it increased in group P. FAR were significantly increased in group S. Exercise induced a significant decrease of EMF (POST vs. E24h) in both groups, but which was significantly lower at E15' in group S than in group P. Exercise induced a significant increase of UA and ACW (POST vs. E15') and Protox (POST vs. E24h) in both groups. An exercise-related decrease in GSH and Pool (POST vs. E15') was found in group P, whereas Vit E and FAR (POST vs. E24h) significantly decreased in both groups. The study showed that exercise induced a decrease in ENIF in horses associated with changes of blood oxidative balance. The (omega-3)vitamin supplementation tested improved the oxidative balance poorly but delayed the exercise-induced decrease of EMF and increased the FAR. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro effects of oxygen on physico-chemical properties of horse erythrocyte membrane
Portier, Karine; Guichardant, Michel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude et al

in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology (2007), 23(3), 340-346

Whether direct exposure to different concentrations (0%, 13%, 100%) of oxygen may affect horse erythrocyte membrane fluidity (EMF) and fatty acid (FA) composition was studied during 1 (T60) and 2 h (T120 ... [more ▼]

Whether direct exposure to different concentrations (0%, 13%, 100%) of oxygen may affect horse erythrocyte membrane fluidity (EMF) and fatty acid (FA) composition was studied during 1 (T60) and 2 h (T120) exposure. EMF was investigated at the head group level and hydrophobic core thanks to phosphorus nucleus 31 (P-31) nuclear magnetic resonance (P-31 NMR) and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using two spin probes: 5-nitroxydestearic acid and 16-doxylstearic acid. Lipid structure of the membranes was studied by gas liquid chromatography. 4-Hydroxy-2E-nonenal was also analyzed as a marker of lipid peroxidation. It increased at T120 13% and 100% oxygen whereas there were no significant changes in membrane dynamic or structure. Correlation was demonstrated between EMF and partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (P-O2). In vitro high rate of oxygenation was efficient to induce lipid peroxidation but did not change membrane dynamics. This may be due to a low free radical production in vitro or to the high red blood cells antioxidant properties. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailBilan medico-sportif du yearling a l’entrainement
Toussaint; Fraipont, Audrey ULg; Wagemans, Marie-Christine et al

in 35èmes Journées AVEF (2007)

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See detailStrategia terapeutica peril trattamento del complesso della malattia respiratoria del bovino: l'esperienza belga
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Coghe, Joost

in Large Animal Review (2007), 13

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See detailParamètres influençant la structure et la fonction du globule rouge chez le cheval
Portier, Karine; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Fellmann, Nicole et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2007), 151(2), 101-106

The erythrocyte, as an oxygen carrier, is submitted to areas where oxidative stress is important. The maintenance of the structure and fluidity of its membrane is essential to its function. Indeed, oxygen ... [more ▼]

The erythrocyte, as an oxygen carrier, is submitted to areas where oxidative stress is important. The maintenance of the structure and fluidity of its membrane is essential to its function. Indeed, oxygen must diffuse through the membrane and the deformability of the cell is essential to its progression through capillaries. The structure and, as a consequence, the fluidity of the membrane influence these properties. The red blood cell presents antioxydant capacities, but in some cases, free radical production is increased and exceeds antiradical defences leading to irreversible defects of the membrane, and, as a consequence, of its function. Horse erythrocyte seems to be more sensitive to oxidative stress than other species and resulting hemorheological changes could have tissular and organic consequences. [less ▲]

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See detailStat5 Is an Ambivalent Regulator of Neutrophil Homeostasis
Fievez, Laurence ULg; Desmet, Christophe ULg; Henry, Emmanuelle et al

in PLoS ONE (2007), 2(1), 727

Although STAT5 promotes survival of hematopoietic progenitors, STAT5-/- mice develop mild neutrophilia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that in STAT5-/- mice, liver endothelial cells (LECs ... [more ▼]

Although STAT5 promotes survival of hematopoietic progenitors, STAT5-/- mice develop mild neutrophilia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that in STAT5-/- mice, liver endothelial cells (LECs) autonomously secrete high amounts of G-CSF, allowing myeloid progenitors to overcompensate for their intrinsic survival defect. However, when injected with pro-inflammatory cytokines, mutant mice cannot further increase neutrophil production, display a severe deficiency in peripheral neutrophil survival, and are therefore unable to maintain neutrophil homeostasis. In wild-type mice, inflammatory stimulation induces rapid STAT5 degradation in LECs, G-CSF production by LECs and other cell types, and then sustained mobilization and expansion of long-lived neutrophils. CONCLUSION: We conclude that STAT5 is an ambivalent factor. In cells of the granulocytic lineage, it exerts an antiapoptotic function that is required for maintenance of neutrophil homeostasis, especially during the inflammatory response. In LECs, STAT5 negatively regulates granulopoiesis by directly or indirectly repressing G-CSF expression. Removal of this STAT5-imposed brake contributes to induction of emergency granulopoiesis. [less ▲]

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See detailChange in blood antioxidant status of horses moved from a stable following diagnosis of equine motor neuron disease
Delguste, Catherine ULg; de Moffarts, B.; Kirschvink, N. et al

in Canadian Veterinary Journal = Revue Vétérinaire Canadienne (2007), 48(11), 1165-1167

The antioxidant status of 10 horses living in stable 1 where 2 cases of equine motor neuron disease had previously been diagnosed was assessed before and 9 weeks after moving to another stable. Duration ... [more ▼]

The antioxidant status of 10 horses living in stable 1 where 2 cases of equine motor neuron disease had previously been diagnosed was assessed before and 9 weeks after moving to another stable. Duration of residence in stable 1, subsequent moving, or both, significantly affected several parameters of the antioxidant status. [less ▲]

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See detailProlactin-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B in bovine mammary epithelial cells: Role in chronic mastitis
Boutet, Philippe ULg; Sulon, Joseph ULg; Closset, R. et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2007), 90(1), 155-164

We sought to determine whether prolactin (PRL) could influence the neutrophilic inflammation that characterizes chronic mastitis. Most of the genes encoding inflammatory proteins depend on the nuclear ... [more ▼]

We sought to determine whether prolactin (PRL) could influence the neutrophilic inflammation that characterizes chronic mastitis. Most of the genes encoding inflammatory proteins depend on the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) for their expression. We addressed the hypothesis that immunomodulatory activities of PRL might arise from an increase in NF-kappa B activity. MAC-T cells, a bovine mammary epithelial cell line, were stimulated with increasing concentrations of bovine PRL ( 1, 5, 25, 125, and 1,000 ng/mL). Level of NF-kappa B binding activity was measured and mRNA was evaluated for IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF), IFN-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, cytokines known to require NF-kappa B for their maximal transcription. Prolactin activated NF-kappa B; maximal NF-kappa B activation was weaker with PRL than with TNF-alpha at 30 or 180 min poststimulation. In addition, PRL significantly amplified, in a dose-dependent manner, mRNA expression of IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF, and TNF-a. We measured PRL concentrations in blood and milk from healthy and chronic mastitis-infected cows, and studied the relationship between the PRL concentration and the degree of inflammation in the mammary gland as indirectly assessed by somatic cell counts (SCC). Plasma PRL did not differ significantly between healthy and chronic mastitis-affected cows (63.7 and 67.5 ng/mL, respectively). Milk PRL concentration was significantly increased in chronic mastitis-affected quarters with the highest SCC, and had a positive significant correlation between SCC, as well as between the number of neutrophils present in milk samples. The present findings show that PRL promotes an inflammatory response in bovine mammary epithelial cells via NF-kappa B activation, and suggest a role for PRL in the pathogenesis of chronic mastitis. [less ▲]

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See detailA therapeutic strategy for treatment of the bovine respiratory disease complex: The rationale for the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with an antibiotic
Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Cattle Practice (2007), 15(Part 2), 115-119

The bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) can be caused by a number of factors involving the animal, its environment, and the presence of infectious agents. The syndrome can be classified into four ... [more ▼]

The bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) can be caused by a number of factors involving the animal, its environment, and the presence of infectious agents. The syndrome can be classified into four grades: Grade 1, subclinical disease; Grade 2, compensated clinical disease; Grade 3, noncompensated clinical disease; and Grade 4, irreversible clinical disease, which threatens the animal's survival. The predisposition of cattle, especially beef calves, to respiratory problems is related to their lack of functional pulmonary hardiness. Selection of breeds that demonstrate adequate pulmonary function and sufficient ventilatory reserve may help in the control of BRDC, but this approach is difficult to implement and slow to produce results. Prophylactic measures, including vaccination programmes and modifying management practices to reduce stress, also have a place in prevention of BRDC. A therapeutic strategy to minimise the economic impact of BRDC includes the use of appropriate antibacterial therapy, modulation of the pulmonary inflammatory reaction, and correction of mechanical disorders. Most cattle affected by BRDC are classified as Grade 3. In these cases, irreversible damage to the lung can only be avoided by simultaneous control of bacterial infection and local inflammation. The basic therapeutic strategy described in this article involves the combination of an antibiotic, such as florfenicol, to act against the relevant pathogens and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as flunixin, to act against the deleterious effects of inflammation [less ▲]

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See detailPulmonary scintigraphy
Votion, Dominique ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in McGorum, B. C.; Dixon, P. M.; Robinson, N. E. (Eds.) et al Equine Respiratory Medicine and Surgery (2007)

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See detailCurrent treatment of respiratory inflammatory disorders in the horse
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Van Erck, Emmanuelle; Art, Tatiana ULg

in XVII. Tagung über Pferdekrankheiten im Rahmen der EQUITANA (2007)

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See detailPotential use of micro-array technology (bio-puce) in the diagnosis of inflammatory disorders in the horse
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Thomas, A.; Ramery, Eve ULg et al

in XVII. Tagung über Pferdekrankheiten im Rahmen der EQUITANA (2007)

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See detailEffect of exercise and training on oxygen transport in healthy standardbred horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Cambier, Carole ULg; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2007), 21

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See detailPulmonary function and antimicrobial concentration after marbofloxacin inhalation in horses.
Art, Tatiana ULg; de Moffarts, B.; Bedoret, Denis ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2007), 161(10), 348-350

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See detailDe novo C16- and C24-ceramide generation contributes to spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis.
Seumois, Gregory; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Gillet, Laurent ULg et al

in Journal of Leukocyte Biology (2007), 81(6), 1477-1486

Neutrophils rapidly undergo spontaneous apoptosis following their release from the bone marrow. Although central to leukocyte homeostasis, the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil apoptosis remain poorly ... [more ▼]

Neutrophils rapidly undergo spontaneous apoptosis following their release from the bone marrow. Although central to leukocyte homeostasis, the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil apoptosis remain poorly understood. We show here that apoptosis of cultured neutrophils is preceded by a substantial increase in the intracellular levels of 16 and 24 carbon atom (C(16)- and C(24))-ceramides, which are lipid second messengers of apoptosis and stress signaling. Treatment of neutrophils with fumonisin B(2), a selective inhibitor of the de novo pathway of ceramide synthesis, prevented accumulation of C(16)- and C(24)-ceramides. Moreover, fumonisin B(2) significantly reduced caspase-3, -8, and -9 activation and apoptosis in these cells. Conversely, 3-O-methylsphingomyelin and fantofarone, which are specific inhibitors of neutral and acid sphingomyelinases, respectively, neither inhibited C(16)- and C(24)-ceramide production nor decreased the apoptosis rate in neutrophils, indicating that in these cells, ceramides are not generated from membrane sphingomyelin. Further experiments showed that increasing endogenous C(16)- and C(24)-ceramide levels by using DL-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol and (1S,2R)-D-erythro-2-(N-myristoylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol, two inhibitors of ceramide metabolism, enhances caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity and increases neutrophil apoptosis. Similarly, apoptosis was induced rapidly when synthetic C(16)- and/or C(24)-ceramides were added to neutrophil cultures. Finally, GM-CSF, a cytokine that delays neutrophil apoptosis, abrogated C(16)- and C(24)-ceramide accumulation totally in cultured neutrophils, whereas Fas ligation accelerated apoptosis in these cells without affecting de novo ceramide production. We conclude that de novo generation of C(16)- and C(24)-ceramides contributes to spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis via caspase activation and that GM-CSF exerts its antiapoptotic effects on neutrophils, at least partly through inhibition of ceramide accumulation. [less ▲]

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See detailSTAT5 is an Ambivalent Regulator of Neutrophil Homeostasis
Fievez, Laurence ULg; Desmet, Christophe ULg; Henry, E. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailDendritic cells genetically engineered to express IL-10 induce long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance in experimental asthma
Henry, E.; Desmet, C. J.; Garzé, V. et al

Poster (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)