References of "Legros, Jean-Jacques"
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See detailThe spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in Belgian patients with MEN1 and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in The 5th International Pituitary congress - Abstract book (1998)

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See detailThe spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in Belgian patients with MEN1 and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in 80th Annual Meeting of the Endocrine society - Abstract book (1998)

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See detailTwo years of replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Vandeweghe, M. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (1997), 47(4), 485-494

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large groups of patients treated for more than one year. In addition, the optimal dose of rhGH for each patient and the baseline parameters that predict which patients will benefit most from therapy or will have adverse events are not entirely elucidated. DESIGN: 148 adult GHD patients were enrolled in a multicentre 2-year rhGH replacement study which was placebo controlled for the first six months. rhGH (Genotropin/Genotonorm Pharmacia & Upjohn) was given in a dose of 0.25 IU/kg/week sc (1.5 IU/m2/day). MEASUREMENTS: Every 3-6 months body composition was measured using body impedance analysis and general well being was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and social self-reporting questionnaire. At the same time patients had a full clinical examination and blood was sampled for glucose, HbA1c, IGF-1, creatinine, full blood count, thyroid hormones and liver function tests. RESULTS: With rhGH therapy IGF-1 levels increased from -2.00 +/- 2.60 SDS to 1.47 +/- 2.6 SDS after six months (P < 0.001), continued to rise despite no change in dose to 1.84 +/- 2.8 SDS after one year and remained constant thereafter (1.98 +/- 2.4 after 2 years). 56% of patients ultimately attained supranormal IGF-1 levels (+2 SD), 22% had levels below the mean, of which 9% were below -2 SD. Within 3 months lean body mass (LBM) increased by +5.09% (P < 0.001), total body water (TBW) by +5.40% (P < 0.001), while body fat (BF) dropped by -10.89% (P < 0.001) and waist circumference by -1.42% (P < 0.004). These effects were maintained during the first year of therapy, but the effect was attenuated after 24 months: LBM, +3.91% (P < 0.001); TBW, +3.28%, P < 0.001, BF, -6.42% (P < 0.001) and waist -2.22% (P < 0.009). Individual differences in response were large and could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters, except for a better response in males. Treatment resulted in a large and progressive improvement on the NHP scale, especially energy, emotions and sleep, but a similar change was also found in patients during placebo treatment. With rhGH the number of full days of sick leave/6 months decreased from 12.17 +/- 3.90 days (SEM) to 7.15 +/- 3.50 days after six months (P = 0.009), 2.93 +/- 1.55 days after 12 months (P = 0.01), 0.39 +/- 0.17 days after 18 months (P < 0.001) and 3.3 +/- 2.51 days after 24 months (P = 0.026). Similarly, the hospitalization rate went down from 14.9 to 7% after 6 months and remained at this level thereafter (P = 0.12). About one third of patients on rhGH experienced fluid-related adverse events, most often within the first 3 months. They usually disappeared spontaneously or responded well to dose reduction. Cumulative dropout rates were 29% after 1 year and 38% after two years. Two thirds of these patients stopped treatment because of insufficient subjective improvement. Neither drop-outs nor fluid retention could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large group of patients the beneficial effects of rhGH therapy on body composition, metabolic parameters and general well-being and found a consistent drop in number of sick days and hospitalization rate. These effects were maintained during two years of therapy, except for an attenuation in body composition changes after 24 months. The high incidence of fluid-related adverse events suggests that it may be better to start with lower doses of rhGH and to increase the dose more slowly over a number of weeks. The finding of suboptimal high or low IGF-1 levels in many patients reinforces guidelines not to give rhGH in a weight-dependent dose but to titrate it individually for each patient. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the IGF system and analysis of the possible molecular mechanisms leading to IGF-II overexpression in a mesothelioma.
Hodzic, D.; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Willemsen, P. et al

in Hormone & Metabolic Research (1997), 29(11), 549-55

The expression of members of the IGF system in a mesothelioma from a patient suffering from hypoglycemia, in term placenta and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells were compared. Very high levels of IGF-II ... [more ▼]

The expression of members of the IGF system in a mesothelioma from a patient suffering from hypoglycemia, in term placenta and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells were compared. Very high levels of IGF-II mRNA and protein were detected in the mesothelioma. Moreover, half of the IGF-II protein took the high-molecular-weight form. We also analyzed the parental imprinting status and the promoter usage of the IGF-II gene. Our results showed loss of imprinting (LOI) in the mesothelioma while the imprinting was maintained in HT29 cells, expressing moderate levels of the transcript. Promoter P4 was active in the three tissues we analyzed, whereas IGF-II mRNA transcription from promoter P3 was only detected in the mesothelioma and the placenta, expressing comparably high levels of the transcript. IGF-II gene structure was identical in the analyzed tissues and cells. The type-I receptor mRNA expression was very low in the tumor. IGFBP-2, -4 and -5 mRNAs were detected in the mesothelioma, while IGFBP-2, -3 and -5 transcripts were detected in the placenta. IGFBP-1 and -6 transcripts were not detected. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysines et cancer pulmonaire a petites cellules
Pirard, Françoise; Pequeux, Christel ULg; Hendrick, J. C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(1), 22-6

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See detailNeurophysins in central diabetes insipidus
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Hormone Research (1996), 45

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See detailThe treatment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in adults : the 148 belgian patients
Beckers, Albert ULg; Moreau, L.; Mockel, J. et al

in The Endocrine Society : Annual meeting, Washington DC, June 1995 (1995)

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See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric et al

in Excerpta Medica (1995), 1098

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See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Yoshida, Sho; Saito, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi (Eds.) Neurohypophysis - Recent Progress of Vasopressin and Oxytocin Research (1995)

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses ... [more ▼]

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses, vasopressin (VP) immunoreactivity is considerably lower in TEC. OT is not secreted by TEC/TNC, but it is presented as the self antigen of the NHP family to developing pre-T cells. The process of T-cell education in recognizing the NHP family involves an active cooperation between this neuroendocrine gene/protein family and the immunoglobulin family. This cooperation is illustrated by the identification in plasma membranes of human TEC of a 55-kDa protein bearing a neurophysin (10 kDa), as well as a MHC class I heavy chain-related domain (45 kDa). Since both OT and VP genes are transcribed in the thymus, the site of this cooperation should be located at posttranscriptional level. From these data, it appears that thymic T-cell education to the NHP family involves specific pathways which are not strictly superimposible to those dlineated using peripheral dedicated APC. Although MHC class I pathways are needed, it appears that thymic T-cell education to NHP self is not restricted in an allelic fashion. This offers significant advantages for the selection of the human T-cell repertoire. Furthermore, the absence of a tight MHC allelic restriction in the process of T-cell education to neuroendocrine self opens novel perpectives for the prevention of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. [less ▲]

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See detailLes phéromones humaines: vestige animal ou réalité non reconnue
Foidart, Agnès ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1994), 49(12), 662-80

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See detailPathogenic Tracks in Fatigue Syndromes
Moutschen, Michel ULg; Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg; Demonty, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1994), 49(6), 274-89

This review analyses the recent literature devoted to two related fatigue syndromes: chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and acute onset postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). The articles are grouped into five ... [more ▼]

This review analyses the recent literature devoted to two related fatigue syndromes: chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and acute onset postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). The articles are grouped into five pathogenic tracks: infectious agents, immune system, skeletic muscle, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and psychiatric factors. Although a particular infectious agent is unlikely to be responsible for all CFS cases, evidence is shown that host-parasite relationships are modified in a large proportion of patients with chronic fatigue. Antibody titres against infectious agents are often elevated and replication of several viruses could be increased. Chronic activation of the immune system is also observed and could be due to the reactivation of persistent or latent infectious agents such as herpes viruses (i.e. HHV-6) or enteroviruses. It could also be favorised by an impaired negative feedback of the HPA axis on the immune system. A model is proposed where the abnormalities of the HPA axis are primary events and are mainly responsible for a chronic activation of the immune system which in turn induces an increased replication of several viruses under the control of cellular transcription factors. These replicating viruses together with cytokines such as TNF-alpha would secondarily induce functional disorders of muscle and several aspects of asthenia itself. [less ▲]

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See detailMembrane Translocation and Relationship with MHC Class I of a Human Thymic Neurophysin-Like Protein
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Vandersmissen, E.; Cormann-Goffin, N. et al

in Thymus (1993), 22(1), 55-66

Thymic epithelial and nurse cells (TEC/TNC) synthesize an oxytocin (OT)-like peptide in association with a neurophysin (NP)-related protein in a way similar to in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (NHP ... [more ▼]

Thymic epithelial and nurse cells (TEC/TNC) synthesize an oxytocin (OT)-like peptide in association with a neurophysin (NP)-related protein in a way similar to in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (NHP) system. The central T-cell tolerance of the NHP neuroendocrine functions have been proposed to be mediated through these thymic NHP-related peptides due to their close homology with the NHP neurohormones OT and vasopressin (VP). In order to investigate their putative presentation by proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human thymic membranes were purified and passed through an immunoaffinity column using mAb B9.12 directed to the monomorphic determinant of human MHC class I proteins. This methodology provided the following observations: (1) a NP-like protein is translocated in human thymic membranes and is retained by B9.12 on the column; (2) the MW of this NP-like material (50-55 kD) is quite different from the MW of hypothalamic NP proteins (10 kD), and (3) this thymic NP-like protein could be identified on Western blots with mAb B9.12. The precise extent of this relationship between the thymic NP-like protein and the Ig/MHC superfamily is actually investigated through the characterization of the genetic mechanisms responsible for the thymic expression of NHP-related peptides. Given the physiological importance of OT and of its binding to NP for transport along the axonal processes of the NHP tract, we postulate that, somewhat analogously, the thymic NP-/MHC class I-related protein could be involved in the presentation of the OT-like peptide to immature T-cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Dual Role of Thymic Neurohypophysial-Related Self Peptides in T Cell Selection. Physiological and Pharmacological Implications
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Robert, Françoise et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (1993), 689

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See detailThymic neurohypophysial-related peptides and T cell selection
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Cormann-Goffin, Nadine; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Regulatory Peptides (1993), 45(1-2), 273-278

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See detailContribution à l'étude des effets de l'exposition à des champs magnétiques 50 Hz sur certains paramètres neuropsychologiques et neuroendocriniens
Crasson, Marion ULg; Timsit-Berthier, Martine; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Psychologie Médicale (1993), 25(13), 1341-1346

Depuis une trentaine d'années, l'exposition des populations industrialisées aux champs électromagnétiques 50/60 Hz n'a cessé de susciter des polémiques concernant ses éventuels effets nocifs. Cette étude ... [more ▼]

Depuis une trentaine d'années, l'exposition des populations industrialisées aux champs électromagnétiques 50/60 Hz n'a cessé de susciter des polémiques concernant ses éventuels effets nocifs. Cette étude préliminaire a été réalisée avec un appareillage original, qui génère des champs magnétiques comparables à ceux rencontrés dans la vie quotidienne. Deux groupes de 10 volontaires en bonne santé ont participé à cette recherche, le premier réellement exposé à un champ d'induction magnétique de 142 microtesla, 50 Hz, pendant une demi-heure, le deuxième exposé de manière simulée. Nos résultats montrent que le champ magnétique n'engendre aucun effet perceptible mais qu'il provoque une légère modification de certains paramètres psychologiques (humeur, attention visuelle). [less ▲]

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See detailThe central role of the thymus in the education of T cells to neuroendocrine self principles
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Cormann-Goffin, Nadine et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1993), 101

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See detailProceedings of 'The Neurohypophysial Peptide Systems', Satellite symposium, Spa-Liège 6-11 September 1992
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

Book (1993)

A great part of the neurohypophysial jigsaw puzzle has taken shape... and now ? This Satellite Symposium of the 9th International Congress of Endocrinology was held at a very appropriate time ! The ... [more ▼]

A great part of the neurohypophysial jigsaw puzzle has taken shape... and now ? This Satellite Symposium of the 9th International Congress of Endocrinology was held at a very appropriate time ! The characterization of three important types of neurohypophysial peptide receptors had then been recently reported. New pharmacological tools had become available to investigate further biological significance of vasopressin- and oxytocin-mediated actions. A few weeks before the meeting, the increasing importance of local paracrine circuits mediated by neurohypophysial signals was brought into focus by the clear demonstration of an intra-uterine circuit with a potential implication in the initiation of labour. Now, we have all returned to our laboratories, armed with new knowledge and inspired by new questions. This is the natural fate of scientific life. If the physiological importance of the oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic V2 systems has been supported by the recent discoveries, may we claim the same with regard to the vasopressinergic V1 pathways ? We were reminded of their importance in the regulation of the vascular tone, but what about the significance of the wide-spread distribution of different V1-subtype receptors ? Although analogies with other peptide systems have to be made with caution, do we in fact not observe similar evolutionary phenomena like those recently evidenced for other hormonally-related tissue growth factors ? Whatever it is, it seems more and more obvious that the precise significance of the V1 system will appear rather from studies about its implication in developmental biology and in paracrine/autocrine signaling, than from studies based on the classical neuroendocrine model of cell-to-cell communication. In any case, much work remains to be carried out before we will get a definitive answer. [less ▲]

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See detailLa fonction centrale du thymus dans la reconnaissance des fonctions neuroendocrines par les lymphocytes T au cours de leur développement
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Cormann-Goffin, N. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1993), 101(4, Jul-Aug), 19-22

The dual physiological role of the thymus in T cell positive and negative selection appears prominent in the establishment of appropriate host immune defenses. However, the cellular and molecular ... [more ▼]

The dual physiological role of the thymus in T cell positive and negative selection appears prominent in the establishment of appropriate host immune defenses. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying those thymic functions begin only to be understood. On the basis of our previous investigations about the thymic expression of different neuroendocrine-related signals, we have advanced a model which transposes at the peptide level the intervention of this primary lymphoid organ in both T cell positive and negative selective processes. There is now ample evidence that the thymic subcapsular and medullary epithelium is the site for synthesis of neurohypophysial (NHP)-related peptides (reviewed in Geenen et al., 1992a). We have also demonstrated that the epithelial component of thymic "nurse" cells (TNC) synthesizes NHP-related peptides and expresses a neuroendocrine-like phenotype (Geenen et al., 1988a). This observation was a remarkable example of the intimate neuroendocrine-immune interactions that take place during T cell ontogeny. Further immunocytochemical analyses have confirmed that one dominant NHP-related epitope belongs to the oxytocin (OT) lineage of the NHP peptide superfamily (Robert et al., 1991, 1992). The intrathymic coexpression of this OT-like epitope with a neurophysin protein domain is a strong argument for a local synthetic process similar to the hypothalamo-NHP one. However, the absence of ir-OT in secretory granules of thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as well as of NHP-related peptides in the supernatant of TEC cultures questioned the application to the thymus of the classical neurosecretory model established for hypothalamic magnocellular neurons (Scharrer [less ▲]

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