References of "Legros, Jean-Jacques"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and related diseases.
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in Human Mutation (1999), 13(1), 54-60

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumors in parathyroids, enteropancreatic endocrine tissues, anterior pituitary, and other tissues. The gene ... [more ▼]

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumors in parathyroids, enteropancreatic endocrine tissues, anterior pituitary, and other tissues. The gene for MEN1 has recently been cloned and shown to code for a 610-amino acid protein of enigmatic function which probably acts as a tumor suppressor. Several mutations causing the MEN1 phenotype have been recently identified. In order to determine the spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in a sample of 25 Belgian patients, we have systematically screened the 10 exons and adjacent sequences of the MEN1 gene by means of an automatic sequencing protocol. Twelve different mutations were identified including nonsense, frameshift, splicing, and missense mutations. Two of these mutations (D172Y and 357del4) occurred more than once. A missense mutation was also found in a kindred with familial hyperparathyroidism. We observed no significant correlation between the nature or position of mutation and the clinical status. We have also detected 6 intragenic polymorphisms and DNA sequence variants and have analyzed their frequencies in our population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (8 ULg)
See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in IV european Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHemodynamic changes induced by laparoscopy and their endocrine correlates: effects of clonidine.
Joris, Jean ULg; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (1998), 32(5), 1389-96

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes induced by PNO by reducing release of catecholamines and vasopressin. BACKGROUND: Both mechanical and neurohumoral factors contribute to the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide PNO. Several mediators have been proposed, but no study has correlated hemodynamic changes with changes in levels of these potential mediators. METHODS: We conducted two studies, each including 20 healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the first study serial measurements of hemodynamics (thermodilution technique) were done during laparoscopy and after exsufflation. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines, vasopressin, renin, endothelin and prostaglandins were measured at the same time points. In the second study patients were randomly allocated to receive 8 microg/kg clonidine infused over 1 h or placebo before PNO. Hemodynamics and plasma levels of cortisol, catecholamines and vasopressin were measured during PNO and after exsufflation. RESULTS: Peritoneal insufflation resulted in a significant reduction of cardiac output (18+/-4%) and increases in mean arterial pressure (39+/-8%) and systemic (70+/-12%) and pulmonary (98+/-18%) vascular resistances. Laparoscopy resulted in progressive and significant increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and renin. Vasopressin plasma concentrations markedly increased immediately after the beginning of PNO (before PNO 6+/-4 pg/ml; during PNO 129+/-42 pg/ml; p < 0.05). The profile of vasopressin release paralleled the time course of changes in systemic vascular resistance. Prostaglandins and endothelin did not change significantly. Clonidine significantly reduced mean arterial pressure, heart rate and the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Clonidine also significantly reduced catecholamine concentrations but did not alter vasopressin and cortisol plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Vasopressin and catecholamines probably mediate the increase in systemic vascular resistance observed during PNO. Clonidine before PNO reduces catecholamine release and attenuates hemodynamic changes during laparoscopy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 ULg)
See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in 5th Euroregional Oncology meeting - abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
See detailThe spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in Belgian patients with MEN1 and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in The 5th International Pituitary congress - Abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailThe spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in Belgian patients with MEN1 and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in 80th Annual Meeting of the Endocrine society - Abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTwo years of replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Vandeweghe, M. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (1997), 47(4), 485-494

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large groups of patients treated for more than one year. In addition, the optimal dose of rhGH for each patient and the baseline parameters that predict which patients will benefit most from therapy or will have adverse events are not entirely elucidated. DESIGN: 148 adult GHD patients were enrolled in a multicentre 2-year rhGH replacement study which was placebo controlled for the first six months. rhGH (Genotropin/Genotonorm Pharmacia & Upjohn) was given in a dose of 0.25 IU/kg/week sc (1.5 IU/m2/day). MEASUREMENTS: Every 3-6 months body composition was measured using body impedance analysis and general well being was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and social self-reporting questionnaire. At the same time patients had a full clinical examination and blood was sampled for glucose, HbA1c, IGF-1, creatinine, full blood count, thyroid hormones and liver function tests. RESULTS: With rhGH therapy IGF-1 levels increased from -2.00 +/- 2.60 SDS to 1.47 +/- 2.6 SDS after six months (P < 0.001), continued to rise despite no change in dose to 1.84 +/- 2.8 SDS after one year and remained constant thereafter (1.98 +/- 2.4 after 2 years). 56% of patients ultimately attained supranormal IGF-1 levels (+2 SD), 22% had levels below the mean, of which 9% were below -2 SD. Within 3 months lean body mass (LBM) increased by +5.09% (P < 0.001), total body water (TBW) by +5.40% (P < 0.001), while body fat (BF) dropped by -10.89% (P < 0.001) and waist circumference by -1.42% (P < 0.004). These effects were maintained during the first year of therapy, but the effect was attenuated after 24 months: LBM, +3.91% (P < 0.001); TBW, +3.28%, P < 0.001, BF, -6.42% (P < 0.001) and waist -2.22% (P < 0.009). Individual differences in response were large and could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters, except for a better response in males. Treatment resulted in a large and progressive improvement on the NHP scale, especially energy, emotions and sleep, but a similar change was also found in patients during placebo treatment. With rhGH the number of full days of sick leave/6 months decreased from 12.17 +/- 3.90 days (SEM) to 7.15 +/- 3.50 days after six months (P = 0.009), 2.93 +/- 1.55 days after 12 months (P = 0.01), 0.39 +/- 0.17 days after 18 months (P < 0.001) and 3.3 +/- 2.51 days after 24 months (P = 0.026). Similarly, the hospitalization rate went down from 14.9 to 7% after 6 months and remained at this level thereafter (P = 0.12). About one third of patients on rhGH experienced fluid-related adverse events, most often within the first 3 months. They usually disappeared spontaneously or responded well to dose reduction. Cumulative dropout rates were 29% after 1 year and 38% after two years. Two thirds of these patients stopped treatment because of insufficient subjective improvement. Neither drop-outs nor fluid retention could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large group of patients the beneficial effects of rhGH therapy on body composition, metabolic parameters and general well-being and found a consistent drop in number of sick days and hospitalization rate. These effects were maintained during two years of therapy, except for an attenuation in body composition changes after 24 months. The high incidence of fluid-related adverse events suggests that it may be better to start with lower doses of rhGH and to increase the dose more slowly over a number of weeks. The finding of suboptimal high or low IGF-1 levels in many patients reinforces guidelines not to give rhGH in a weight-dependent dose but to titrate it individually for each patient. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of the IGF system and analysis of the possible molecular mechanisms leading to IGF-II overexpression in a mesothelioma.
Hodzic, D.; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Willemsen, P. et al

in Hormone & Metabolic Research (1997), 29(11), 549-55

The expression of members of the IGF system in a mesothelioma from a patient suffering from hypoglycemia, in term placenta and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells were compared. Very high levels of IGF-II ... [more ▼]

The expression of members of the IGF system in a mesothelioma from a patient suffering from hypoglycemia, in term placenta and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells were compared. Very high levels of IGF-II mRNA and protein were detected in the mesothelioma. Moreover, half of the IGF-II protein took the high-molecular-weight form. We also analyzed the parental imprinting status and the promoter usage of the IGF-II gene. Our results showed loss of imprinting (LOI) in the mesothelioma while the imprinting was maintained in HT29 cells, expressing moderate levels of the transcript. Promoter P4 was active in the three tissues we analyzed, whereas IGF-II mRNA transcription from promoter P3 was only detected in the mesothelioma and the placenta, expressing comparably high levels of the transcript. IGF-II gene structure was identical in the analyzed tissues and cells. The type-I receptor mRNA expression was very low in the tumor. IGFBP-2, -4 and -5 mRNAs were detected in the mesothelioma, while IGFBP-2, -3 and -5 transcripts were detected in the placenta. IGFBP-1 and -6 transcripts were not detected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophysines et cancer pulmonaire a petites cellules
Pirard, Françoise; Pequeux, Christel ULg; Hendrick, J. C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(1), 22-6

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophysins in central diabetes insipidus
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Hormone Research (1996), 45

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
See detailThe treatment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in adults : the 148 belgian patients
Beckers, Albert ULg; Moreau, L.; Mockel, J. et al

in The Endocrine Society : Annual meeting, Washington DC, June 1995 (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric et al

in Excerpta Medica (1995), 1098

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Yoshida, Sho; Saito, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi (Eds.) Neurohypophysis - Recent Progress of Vasopressin and Oxytocin Research (1995)

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses ... [more ▼]

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses, vasopressin (VP) immunoreactivity is considerably lower in TEC. OT is not secreted by TEC/TNC, but it is presented as the self antigen of the NHP family to developing pre-T cells. The process of T-cell education in recognizing the NHP family involves an active cooperation between this neuroendocrine gene/protein family and the immunoglobulin family. This cooperation is illustrated by the identification in plasma membranes of human TEC of a 55-kDa protein bearing a neurophysin (10 kDa), as well as a MHC class I heavy chain-related domain (45 kDa). Since both OT and VP genes are transcribed in the thymus, the site of this cooperation should be located at posttranscriptional level. From these data, it appears that thymic T-cell education to the NHP family involves specific pathways which are not strictly superimposible to those dlineated using peripheral dedicated APC. Although MHC class I pathways are needed, it appears that thymic T-cell education to NHP self is not restricted in an allelic fashion. This offers significant advantages for the selection of the human T-cell repertoire. Furthermore, the absence of a tight MHC allelic restriction in the process of T-cell education to neuroendocrine self opens novel perpectives for the prevention of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes phéromones humaines: vestige animal ou réalité non reconnue
Foidart, Agnès ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1994), 49(12), 662-80

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPathogenic Tracks in Fatigue Syndromes
Moutschen, Michel ULg; Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg; Demonty, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1994), 49(6), 274-89

This review analyses the recent literature devoted to two related fatigue syndromes: chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and acute onset postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). The articles are grouped into five ... [more ▼]

This review analyses the recent literature devoted to two related fatigue syndromes: chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and acute onset postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). The articles are grouped into five pathogenic tracks: infectious agents, immune system, skeletic muscle, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and psychiatric factors. Although a particular infectious agent is unlikely to be responsible for all CFS cases, evidence is shown that host-parasite relationships are modified in a large proportion of patients with chronic fatigue. Antibody titres against infectious agents are often elevated and replication of several viruses could be increased. Chronic activation of the immune system is also observed and could be due to the reactivation of persistent or latent infectious agents such as herpes viruses (i.e. HHV-6) or enteroviruses. It could also be favorised by an impaired negative feedback of the HPA axis on the immune system. A model is proposed where the abnormalities of the HPA axis are primary events and are mainly responsible for a chronic activation of the immune system which in turn induces an increased replication of several viruses under the control of cellular transcription factors. These replicating viruses together with cytokines such as TNF-alpha would secondarily induce functional disorders of muscle and several aspects of asthenia itself. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMembrane Translocation and Relationship with MHC Class I of a Human Thymic Neurophysin-Like Protein
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Vandersmissen, E.; Cormann-Goffin, N. et al

in Thymus (1993), 22(1), 55-66

Thymic epithelial and nurse cells (TEC/TNC) synthesize an oxytocin (OT)-like peptide in association with a neurophysin (NP)-related protein in a way similar to in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (NHP ... [more ▼]

Thymic epithelial and nurse cells (TEC/TNC) synthesize an oxytocin (OT)-like peptide in association with a neurophysin (NP)-related protein in a way similar to in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (NHP) system. The central T-cell tolerance of the NHP neuroendocrine functions have been proposed to be mediated through these thymic NHP-related peptides due to their close homology with the NHP neurohormones OT and vasopressin (VP). In order to investigate their putative presentation by proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human thymic membranes were purified and passed through an immunoaffinity column using mAb B9.12 directed to the monomorphic determinant of human MHC class I proteins. This methodology provided the following observations: (1) a NP-like protein is translocated in human thymic membranes and is retained by B9.12 on the column; (2) the MW of this NP-like material (50-55 kD) is quite different from the MW of hypothalamic NP proteins (10 kD), and (3) this thymic NP-like protein could be identified on Western blots with mAb B9.12. The precise extent of this relationship between the thymic NP-like protein and the Ig/MHC superfamily is actually investigated through the characterization of the genetic mechanisms responsible for the thymic expression of NHP-related peptides. Given the physiological importance of OT and of its binding to NP for transport along the axonal processes of the NHP tract, we postulate that, somewhat analogously, the thymic NP-/MHC class I-related protein could be involved in the presentation of the OT-like peptide to immature T-cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Dual Role of Thymic Neurohypophysial-Related Self Peptides in T Cell Selection. Physiological and Pharmacological Implications
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Robert, Françoise et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (1993), 689

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThymic neurohypophysial-related peptides and T cell selection
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Cormann-Goffin, Nadine; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Regulatory Peptides (1993), 45(1-2), 273-278

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)