References of "Laureys, Steven"
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See detailNeuroimaging in Disorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Filippi, M. (Ed.) Oxford Textbook of Clinical Neurology (2014)

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See detailAmantadine, Apomorphine and Zolpidem in the Treatment of Disorders of Consciousness
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Thonnard, Marie ULg et al

in Current Pharmaceutical Design (2014), 20

Survivors of severe brain injuries may end up in a state of 'wakeful unresponsiveness' or in a minimally conscious state. Pharmacological treatments of patients with disorders of consciousness aim to ... [more ▼]

Survivors of severe brain injuries may end up in a state of 'wakeful unresponsiveness' or in a minimally conscious state. Pharmacological treatments of patients with disorders of consciousness aim to improve arousal levels and recovery of consciousness. We here provide a systematic overview of the therapeutic effects of amantadine, apomorphine and zolpidem in patients recovering from coma. Evidence from clinical trials using these commonly prescribed pharmacological agents suggests positive changes in the neurological status in patients, leading sometimes to dramatic improvements. These findings are discussed in the context of current hypotheses of these agents' therapeutic mechanisms on cerebral function. In order to enhance our understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of these drugs, we suggest combining sensitive and specific behavioral tools with neuroimaging and electrophysiological measures in large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental designs. We conclude that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of amantadine, apomorphine and zolpidem need further exploration to determine which treatment would provide a better neurological outcome regarding the patient's etiology, diagnosis, time since injury and overall condition. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the statistical assessment of small sample classification
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Gomez, Francisco et al

Conference (2013, December)

Classifiers start to be used in medical application to infer diagnosis. Their results are assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Distributions built from classification of random data ... [more ▼]

Classifiers start to be used in medical application to infer diagnosis. Their results are assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Distributions built from classification of random data with cross-validation, did not follow the theoretical binomial distribution, showing that binomial test was not conservative enough. A permutation test is thus recommended. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury
Williams, Shawniqua; Conte, Mary; Goldfine, Andrew et al

in eLife (2013)

Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known ... [more ▼]

Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. [less ▲]

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See detailElectroencephalographic profiles for differentiation of disorders of consciousness.
Malinowska, U; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2013), 12

BACKGROUND: Electroencephalography (EEG) is best suited for long-term monitoring of brain functions in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Mathematical tools are needed to facilitate efficient ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Electroencephalography (EEG) is best suited for long-term monitoring of brain functions in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Mathematical tools are needed to facilitate efficient interpretation of long-duration sleep-wake EEG recordings. METHODS: Starting with matching pursuit (MP) decomposition, we automatically detect and parametrize sleep spindles, slow wave activity, K-complexes and alpha, beta and theta waves present in EEG recordings, and automatically construct profiles of their time evolution, relevant to the assessment of residual brain function in patients with DOC. RESULTS: Above proposed EEG profiles were computed for 32 patients diagnosed as minimally conscious state (MCS, 20 patients), vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS, 11 patients) and Locked-in Syndrome (LiS, 1 patient). Their interpretation revealed significant correlations between patients' behavioral diagnosis and: (a) occurrence of sleep EEG patterns including sleep spindles, slow wave activity and light/deep sleep cycles, (b) appearance and variability across time of alpha, beta, and theta rhythms. Discrimination between MCS and VS/UWS based upon prominent features of these profiles classified correctly 87 % of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Proposed EEG profiles offer user-independent, repeatable, comprehensive and continuous representation of relevant EEG characteristics, intended as an aid in differentiation between VS/UWS and MCS states and diagnostic prognosis. To enable further development of this methodology into clinically usable tests, we share user-friendly software for MP decomposition of EEG (http://braintech.pl/svarog) and scripts used for creation of the presented profiles (attached to this article). [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic change of global and local information processing in Propofol-induced loss and recovery of consciousness
Monti, Martin; Lutkenoff, Evan; Rubinov, Mikail et al

in PLoS Computational Biology (2013), 9

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See detailA Comparison of Two Spelling Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Visual P3 and SSVEP in Locked-In Syndrome
Combaz, Adrien; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Robben, Arne et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(9), 73691

Objectives: We study the applicability of a visual P3-based and a Steady State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP)-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) for mental text spelling on a cohort of patients ... [more ▼]

Objectives: We study the applicability of a visual P3-based and a Steady State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP)-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) for mental text spelling on a cohort of patients with incomplete Locked-In Syndrome (LIS). Methods: Seven patients performed repeated sessions with each BCI. We assessed BCI performance, mental workload and overall satisfaction for both systems. We also investigated the effect of the quality of life and level of motor impairment on the performance. Results: All seven patients were able to achieve an accuracy of 70% or more with the SSVEP-based BCI, compared to 3 patients with the P3-based BCI, showing a better performance with the SSVEP BCI than with the P3 BCI in the studied cohort. Moreover, the better performance of the SSVEP-based BCI was accompanied by a lower mental workload and a higher overall satisfaction. No relationship was found between BCI performance and level of motor impairment or quality of life. Conclusion:Our results show a better usability of the SSVEP-based BCI than the P3-based one for the sessions performed by the tested population of locked-in patients with respect to all the criteria considered. The study shows the advantage of developing alternative BCIs with respect to the traditional matrix-based P3 speller using different designs and signal modalities such as SSVEPs to build a faster, more accurate, less mentally demanding and more satisfying BCI by testing both types of BCIs on a convenience sample of LIS patients. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in Effective Connectivity by Propofol Sedation
Gomez Jaramillo, Francisco Albeiro ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(8), 71370

Mechanisms of propofol-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Recent fMRI studies have shown decreases in functional connectivity during unconsciousness induced by this anesthetic agent ... [more ▼]

Mechanisms of propofol-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Recent fMRI studies have shown decreases in functional connectivity during unconsciousness induced by this anesthetic agent. Functional connectivity does not provide information of directional changes in the dynamics observed during unconsciousness. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in healthy humans during an auditory task, the changes in effective connectivity resulting from propofol induced loss of consciousness. We used Dynamic Causal Modeling for fMRI (fMRI-DCM) to assess how causal connectivity is influenced by the anesthetic agent in the auditory system. Our results suggest that the dynamic observed in the auditory system during unconsciousness induced by propofol, can result in a mixture of two effects: a local inhibitory connectivity increase and a decrease in the effective connectivity in sensory cortices. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain dead yet mind alive: A positron emission tomography case study of brain metabolism in Cotard’s syndrome
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49(7), 1997-1999

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See detailCharacteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3),

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined ... [more ▼]

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined event have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep in the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and minimally conscious state
Cologan, Victor ULg; Drouot, Xavier; Parapatics, Silvia et al

in Journal of Neurotrauma (2013), 30(5), 339-346

The goal of our study was to investigate different aspects of sleep, namely the sleep-wake cycle and sleep stages, in the vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally ... [more ▼]

The goal of our study was to investigate different aspects of sleep, namely the sleep-wake cycle and sleep stages, in the vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious state (MCS). 24h polysomnography was performed in 20 patients in a UWS (n=10) or in a MCS (n=10) due to brain injury. The data were first tested for the presence of a sleep-wake cycle and the observed sleep patterns were compared to standard scoring criteria. Sleep spindles, slow waves sleep and rapid eye movement sleep were quantified and their clinical value was investigated. According to our results, an electrophysiological sleep-wake cycle was identified in 5 MCS and 3 VS/UWS patients. Sleep stages did not always match the standard scoring criteria which therefore needed to be adapted. Sleep spindles were more present in patients who clinically improved within 6 months. Slow wave sleep was present in 8 MCS and 3 VS/UWS patients but never in the ischemic etiology. Rapid eye movement sleep, and therefore dreaming which is a form of consciousness, was present in all MCS and 3 VS/UWS patients. In conclusion, the presence of alternating periods of eyes-open/eyes-closed cycles does not necessarily imply preserved electrophysiological sleep architecture in the UWS and MCS, contrary to previous definition. The investigation of sleep is a little studied yet simple and informative way to evaluate the integrity of residual brain function in patients with disorders of consciousness with possible clinical diagnostic and prognostic implications. [less ▲]

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See detailActigraphy assessments of circadian sleep-wake cycles in the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States
Cruse, Damian; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2013), 11(18),

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See detailConsciousness supporting networks
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Current Opinion in Neurobiology (2013), 23(2), 239244

Functional neuroimaging shows that patients with disorders of consciousness exhibit disrupted system-level functional connectivity. Unresponsive/’’vegetative state’’ patients preserve wakefulness networks ... [more ▼]

Functional neuroimaging shows that patients with disorders of consciousness exhibit disrupted system-level functional connectivity. Unresponsive/’’vegetative state’’ patients preserve wakefulness networks of brainstem and basal forebrain but the cerebral networks accounting for external perceptual awareness and internal self-related mentation are disrupted. Specifically, the ‘external awareness’ network encompassing lateral fronto-temporo-parietal cortices bilaterally, and the ‘internal awareness’ network including midline anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal and posterior cingulate/ precuneal cortices, are functionally disconnected. By contrast, patients in minimally conscious state ‘minus’, who show nonreflex behaviors, are characterized by right-lateralized recovery of the external awareness network. Similarly, patients who evolve to minimally conscious state ‘plus’ and respond to commands recover the dominant left-lateralized language network. Now, the use of active experimental paradigms targeting at detecting motor-independent signs of awareness or even establishing communication with these patients, challenge these two clinical boundaries. Such advances are naturally accompanied by legitimate neuroscientific and ethical queries demanding our attention on the medical implementations of this new knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailLooking for the self in pathological unconsciousness.
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7

There is an intimate relationship between consciousness and the notion of self. By studying patients with disorders of consciousness, we are offered with a unique lesion approach to tackle the neural ... [more ▼]

There is an intimate relationship between consciousness and the notion of self. By studying patients with disorders of consciousness, we are offered with a unique lesion approach to tackle the neural correlates of self in the absence of subjective reports. Studies employing neuroimaging techniques point to the critical involvement of midline anterior and posterior cortices in response to the passive presentation of self-referential stimuli, such as the patient’s own name and own face. Also, resting state studies show that these midline regions are severely impaired as a function of the level of consciousness. Theoretical frameworks combining all this progress surpass the functional localization of self-related cognition and suggest a dynamic system-level approach to the phenomenological complexity of subjectivity. Importantly for non-communicating patients suffering from disorders of consciousness, the clinical translation of these technologies will allow medical professionals and families to better comprehend these disorders and plan efficient medical management for these patients. [less ▲]

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See detailA multiscale method for a robust detection of the default mode network.
Baquero, Katherine; Gómez, Francisco; Cifuentes, Christian et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailLa stimulation transcranienne a courant continu : un nouvel outil de neurostimulation.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Revue Neurologique (2013), 169

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe method to modulate cortical excitability. Anodal stimulation can improve the stimulated area's functions whereas cathodal stimulation reduces them ... [more ▼]

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe method to modulate cortical excitability. Anodal stimulation can improve the stimulated area's functions whereas cathodal stimulation reduces them. Currently, a lot of clinical trials have been conducted to study the effect of tDCS on post-stroke motor and language deficits, in depression, chronic pain, memory impairment and tinnitus in order to decrease symptoms. Results showed that, if an effect is observed with tDCS, it does not persist over time. Current studies suggest that direct current stimulation is a promising technique that helps to improve rehabilitation after stroke, to enhance cognitive deficiencies, to reduce depression and to relieve chronic pain. Moreover, it is a safe, simple and cheap device that could be easily integrated in a rehabilitation program. [less ▲]

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See detailAltered network properties of the fronto-parietal network and the thalamus in impaired consciousness
Crone, Julia Sophia; Soddu, Andrea ULg; Höller, Yvonne et al

in NeuroImage: Clinical (2013)

Recovery of consciousness has been associated with connectivity in the frontal cortex and parietal regions modulated by the thalamus. To examine this model and to relate alterations to deficits in ... [more ▼]

Recovery of consciousness has been associated with connectivity in the frontal cortex and parietal regions modulated by the thalamus. To examine this model and to relate alterations to deficits in cognitive functioning and conscious processing, we investigated topological network properties in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness recovered from coma. Resting state fMRI data of 34 patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and 25 in minimally conscious state were compared to 28 healthy controls.We investigated global and local network characteristics. Additionally, behavioralmeasureswere correlatedwith the localmetrics of 28 regionswithin the fronto-parietal network and the thalamus. In chronic disorders of consciousness, modularity at the global level was reduced suggesting a disturbance in the optimal balance between segregation and integration.Moreover, network properties were altered in several regionswhich are associatedwith conscious processing (particularly, inmedial parietal, and frontal regions, aswell as in the thalamus). Between minimally conscious and unconscious patients the local efficiency of medial parietal regions differed. Alterations in the thalamus were particularly evident in non-conscious patients.Most of the regions affected in patientswith impaired consciousness belong to the so-called ‘rich club’ of highly interconnected central nodes. Disturbances in their topological characteristics have severe impact on information integration and are reflected in deficits in cognitive functioning probably leading to a total breakdown of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailComa and disorders of consciousness: scientific advances and practical considerations for clinicians
Bodart, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg

in Seminars in Neurology (2013), 33

Recently, neuroscientists and clinicians have seen the rapid evolution of diagnoses in disorders of consciousness. The unresponsive wakefulness syndrome–vegetative state, the minimally conscious state ... [more ▼]

Recently, neuroscientists and clinicians have seen the rapid evolution of diagnoses in disorders of consciousness. The unresponsive wakefulness syndrome–vegetative state, the minimally conscious state plus and minus, and the functional locked-in syndrome have been defined using new neuroimaging techniques. Diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroen- cephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques have all promoted important discoveries in the field of disorders of consciousness. This has led to a better understanding of these patients’ condition and to the development of new prognosis, therapeutic, and communication tools. However, low sensitivity and artifacts problems need to be solved to bring these new technologies to the single-patient level; they also need to be studied in larger scale and randomized control trials. In addition, new ethics questions have arisen and need to be investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailSpasticity after stroke: Physiology, assessment and treatment
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Ziegler, Erik ULg et al

in Brain Injury (2013), 27(10), 1093-1105

Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses ... [more ▼]

Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses explaining its development after a stroke, give an overview of related neuroimaging studies as well as a description of the most common scales used to quantify the degree of spasticity and finally explore which treatments are currently being used to treat this disorder. The lack of consensus is highlighted on the basis of spasticity and the associated absence of guidelines for treatment, use of drugs and rehabilitation programmes. Future studies require controlled protocols to determine the efficiency of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Neuroimaging may help predict the occurrence of spasticity and could provide insight into its neurological basis. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional neuroanatomy of disorders of consciousness
Di Perri, Carol; Stender, Johan; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in CAVANNA, Andrea (Ed.) Epilepsy and behavior Alteration of Counsciousness in Epilepsy (2013)

Our understanding of the mechanisms of loss and recovery of consciousness, following severe brain injury or during anesthesia, is changing rapidly. Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that patients ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of the mechanisms of loss and recovery of consciousness, following severe brain injury or during anesthesia, is changing rapidly. Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that patients with chronic disorders of consciousness and subjects undergoing general anesthesia present a complex dysfunctionality in the architecture of brain connectivity. At present, the global hallmark of impaired consciousness appears to be amultifaceted dysfunctional connectivity pattern with both within-network loss of connectivity in awidespread frontoparietal network and between-network hyperconnectivity involving other regions such as the insula and ventral tegmental area. Despite ongoing efforts, the mechanisms underlying the emergence of consciousness after severe brain injury are not thoroughly understood. Important questions remain unanswered:What triggers the connectivity impairment leading to disorders of consciousness? Why do some patients recover from coma, while others with apparently similar brain injuries do not? Understanding these mechanisms could lead to a better comprehension of brain function and, hopefully, lead to new therapeutic strategies in this challenging patient population. [less ▲]

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