References of "Laureys, Steven"
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See detailInterfaces cerveau-ordinateur, locked-in syndrome et troubles de la conscience.
Lesenfants, Damien; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Medecine sciences : M/S (2015), 31(10), 904-11

Detecting signs of consciousness in patients with severe brain injury constitutes a real challenge for clinicians. The current gold standard in clinical diagnosis is the behavioral scale relying on motor ... [more ▼]

Detecting signs of consciousness in patients with severe brain injury constitutes a real challenge for clinicians. The current gold standard in clinical diagnosis is the behavioral scale relying on motor abilities, which are often impaired or nonexistent in these patients. In this context, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) could offer a potential complementary tool to detect signs of consciousness whilst bypassing the usual motor pathway. In addition to complementing behavioral assessments and potentially reducing error rate, BCIs could also serve as a communication tool for paralyzed but conscious patients, e.g., suffering from Locked-In Syndrome. In this paper, we report on recent work conducted by the Coma Science Group on BCI technology, aiming to optimize diagnosis and communication in patients with disorders of consciousness and Locked-In syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain computer interface for assessing consciousness in severely brain-injured patients
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Lesenfants, Damien; Bodien, Yelena G et al

in Rosetti, Andrea; LAUREYS, Steven (Eds.) Clinical Neurophysiology in Disorders of Consciousness (2015)

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See detailIs the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised a Useful Clinical Tool for Managing Pain in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness?
Chatelle, Camille ULg; De Val, Marie Daniele; Catano, Antonio et al

in The Clinical journal of pain (2015)

OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to assess the clinical interest of the Nociception Coma Scale Revised (NCS-R) in pain management of patients with disorders of consciousness. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to assess the clinical interest of the Nociception Coma Scale Revised (NCS-R) in pain management of patients with disorders of consciousness. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with potential painful conditions (e.g., due to fractures, decubitus ulcers or spasticity) were assessed during nursing cares before and after the administration of an analgesic treatment tailored to each patient's clinical status. In addition to the NCS-R, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was used before and during treatment in order to observe fluctuations in consciousness. Twenty-three of them had no analgesic treatment prior to the assessment whereas the analgesic treatment has been adapted in the other 16 patients. We performed non-parametric Wilcoxon tests to investigate the difference in the NCS-R and GCS total scores but also in the NCS-R subscores before versus during treatment. The effect of the level of consciousness and the etiology were assessed using a U Mann Whitney. RESULTS: NCS-R total scores were statistically lower during treatment when compared to the scores obtained before treatment. We also found that the motor, verbal and facial expression subscores were lower during treatment than before treatment. On the other hand, we found no difference between the GCS total scores obtained before versus during treatment. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest that the NCS-R is an interesting clinical tool for pain management. Besides, this tool seems useful when a balance is needed between reduced pain and preserved level of consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative rates of brain glucose metabolism distinguish minimally conscious from vegetative state patients.
Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders et al

in Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (2015), 35(1), 58-65

The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc ... [more ▼]

The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n=14), MCS (n=21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n=6), and healthy volunteers (n=29). Global cortical CMRglc in VS/UWS and MCS averaged 42% and 55% of normal, respectively. Differences between VS/UWS and MCS were most pronounced in the frontoparietal cortex, at 42% and 60% of normal. In brainstem and thalamus, metabolism declined equally in the two conditions. In EMCS, metabolic rates were indistinguishable from those of MCS. Ordinal logistic regression predicted that patients are likely to emerge into MCS at CMRglc above 45% of normal. Receiver-operating characteristics showed that patients in MCS and VS/UWS can be differentiated with 82% accuracy, based on cortical metabolism. Together these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic disorders of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; BODART, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Canavero, Sergio (Ed.) Surgical Principles of Therapeutic Cortical Stimulation (2015)

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See detailClinical Response to tDCS Depends on Residual Brain Metabolism and Grey Matter Integrity in Patients With Minimally Conscious State.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Di Perri, Carol; Chatelle, Camille ULg et al

in Brain stimulation (2015), 8(6), 1116-23

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it remains unclear why clinical improvement is only observed in a subgroup of patients. OBJECTIVES: In this retrospective study, we investigated the relationship between tDCS responsiveness and neuroimaging data from MCS patients. METHODS: Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and clinical electroencephalography (EEG) were acquired in 21 sub-acute and chronic MCS patients (8 tDCS responders) who subsequently (<48 h) received left dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPF) tDCS in a double-blind randomized cross-over trial. The behavioral data have been published elsewhere (Thibaut et al., Neurology, 2014). RESULTS: Grey matter atrophy was observed in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the cingulate cortex, the hippocampi, part of the rolandic regions, and the left thalamus. FDG-PET showed hypometabolism in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the thalamus. EEG did not show any difference between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the transient increase of signs of consciousness following left DLPF tDCS in patients in MCS require grey matter preservation and residual metabolic activity in cortical and subcortical brain areas known to be involved in attention and working memory. These results further underline the critical role of long-range cortico-thalamic connections in consciousness recovery, providing important information for guidelines on the use of tDCS in disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal connectivity: a marker of dynamical functional connectivity applied to consciousness
Liegeois, Raphaël ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015)

In the last years functional connectivity (FC) has become one of the most popular tools to explore and characterize information contained in fMRI =me series. The classical hypothesis on FC consists of ... [more ▼]

In the last years functional connectivity (FC) has become one of the most popular tools to explore and characterize information contained in fMRI =me series. The classical hypothesis on FC consists of considering it as constant (or static) over the whole fMRI time series. However, it has been emphasized recently that FC should be treated as a dynamical quantity, for example by using sliding windows of the fMRI time courses in order to compute a dynamical FC. We propose a comprehensive marker of FC based on an auto-regressive (AR) model of fMRI time series capturing its static and dynamic properties. We call it total connectivity and we illustrate the benefits of our approach on data of patients undergoing four different states of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of response to command using voluntary control of breathing in disorders of consciousness
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Lesenfants, Damien; Sela, Lee et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014), 8(1020),

BACKGROUND: Detecting signs of consciousness in patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS/VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is known to be very challenging. Plotkin et al ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Detecting signs of consciousness in patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS/VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is known to be very challenging. Plotkin et al. (2010) recently showed the possibility of using a breathing-controlled communication device in patients with locked in syndrome. We here aim to test a breathing-based "sniff controller" that could be used as an alternative diagnostic tool to evaluate response to command in severely brain damaged patients with chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). METHODS: Twenty-five DOC patients were included. Patients' resting breathing-amplitude was measured during a 5 min resting condition. Next, they were instructed to end the presentation of a music sequence by sniffing vigorously. An automated detection of changes in breathing amplitude (i.e., >1.5 SD of resting) ended the music and hence provided positive feedback to the patient. RESULTS: None of the 11 UWS/VS patients showed a sniff-based response to command. One out of 14 patients with MCS was able to willfully modulate his breathing pattern to answer the command on 16/19 trials (accuracy 84%). Interestingly, this patient failed to show any other motor response to command. DISCUSSION: We here illustrate the possible interest of using breathing-dependent response to command in the detection of residual cognition in patients with DOC after severe brain injury. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in cerebral metabolism in patients with a minimally conscious state responding to zolpidem.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Frontiers in Neuroscience (2014)

BACKGROUND: Zolpidem, a short-acting non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist hypnotic, has been shown to induce paradoxical responses in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), leading to recovery of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Zolpidem, a short-acting non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist hypnotic, has been shown to induce paradoxical responses in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), leading to recovery of arousal and cognitive abilities. We here assessed zolpidem-induced changes in regional brain metabolism in three patients with known zolpidem response in chronic post-anoxic minimally conscious state (MCS). METHODS: [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and standardized clinical assessments using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised were performed after administration of 10 mg zolpidem or placebo in a randomized double blind 2-day protocol. PET data preprocessing and comparison with a healthy age-matched control group were performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8). RESULTS: Behaviorally, all patients recovered functional communication after administration of zolpidem (i.e., emergence from the MCS). FDG-PET showed increased metabolism in dorsolateral prefrontal and mesiofrontal cortices after zolpidem but not after placebo administration. CONCLUSION: Our data show a metabolic activation of prefrontal areas, corroborating the proposed mesocircuit hypothesis to explain the paradoxical effect of zolpidem observed in some patients with DOC. It also suggests the key role of the prefrontal cortices in the recovery of functional communication and object use in hypoxic patients with chronic MCS. [less ▲]

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See detailNEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCES IN PATIENTS WITH LOCKED-IN SYNDROME
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Lugo Ramirez, Zulay del Rosario ULg; Jourdan, Jean-Pierre et al

Poster (2014, October 04)

Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) are classically associated with positive emotions like peacefulness, happiness and joy [1-3]. To date, few negative NDEs reports have been documented [4]. Although NDEs ... [more ▼]

Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) are classically associated with positive emotions like peacefulness, happiness and joy [1-3]. To date, few negative NDEs reports have been documented [4]. Although NDEs classically arise in the context of an acute severe brain damage, their associated memories are reported as being phenomenologically very rich and detailed [5]. To date, no satisfactory explanatory model exits to fully account for the rich phenomenology of NDEs following a severe acute brain injury [6]. Neurobiological hypotheses include cerebral hypoxia [7, 8] and temporal lobe dysfunctions [9] to account for some of the features occurring during NDEs. However, it has been recently shown that anoxic/hypoxic, traumatic and other supratentorial brain lesions do not seem to influence the content of a NDE when assessed with a standardized tool (i.e., Greyson NDE scale; [1]). Due to their particular brain lesion (i.e., pontine brainstem), locked-in syndrome (LIS) patients provide a unique opportunity to further investigate the neural correlates of NDEs. We here aimed at retrospectively characterizing the content of NDEs in patients with LIS having suffered from an acute brainstem lesion (cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or trauma; i.e., “LIS NDEs”) and to compare these experiences to those collected in a cohort of matched NDE experiencers after coma with supratentorial lesions (CVA or trauma; i.e., “classical NDEs”). [less ▲]

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See detailSwallowing in disorders of consciousness
Bicego, Aminata; Lejoly, Kelly ULg; Maudoux, Audrey et al

in Revue Neurologique (2014), 170(10),

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See detailNeurophysiology of hypnosis
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2014), 44

We here review behavioral, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of hypnosis as a state, as well as hypnosis as a tool to modulate brain responses to painful stimulations. Studies have shown that ... [more ▼]

We here review behavioral, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of hypnosis as a state, as well as hypnosis as a tool to modulate brain responses to painful stimulations. Studies have shown that hypnotic processes modify internal (self awareness) as well as external (environmental awareness) brain networks. Brain mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain perception under hypnotic conditions involve cortical as well as subcortical areas including anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, basal ganglia and thalami. Combined with local anesthesia and conscious sedation in patients undergoing surgery, hypnosis is associated with improved peri- and postoperative comfort of patients and surgeons. Finally, hypnosis can be considered as a useful analogue for simulating conversion and dissociation symptoms in healthy subjects, permitting better characterization of these challenging disorders by producing clinically similar experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailNear-death experiences in non-life-threatening events and coma of different etiologies.
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Jourdan, Jean-Pierre; Thonnard, Marie ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 16)

Near death experiences (NDEs) are increasingly being reported as a clearly identifiable physiological and psychological reality of clinical significance. Empirical studies of NDEs have mostly been ... [more ▼]

Near death experiences (NDEs) are increasingly being reported as a clearly identifiable physiological and psychological reality of clinical significance. Empirical studies of NDEs have mostly been conducted in patients with life threatening situations such as cardiac arrest [1-5] or (albeit more rarely) in patients with severe traumatic brain injury[6]. To the best of our knowledge, no study has formally compared the influence of the cause of coma to the intensity or content of the NDE. Using the Greyson NDE scale [7], the present retrospective study aimed at: (1) exploring the NDE intensity and content in “NDE-like” accounts following non-life-threatening events versus “real NDE” following coma; (2) comparing the “real NDE” characteristics according to the etiology of the brain damage (anoxic, traumatic or other) and; (3) comparing our retrospectively obtained data in anoxic coma to historical previously published prospectively collected post-anoxic NDEs. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation combined with high density EEG in altered states of consciousness
Napolitani, M.; Bodart, Olivier ULg; Canali, P. et al

in Brain injury : [BI] (2014), 28(9), 1180-1189

Background: This review discusses the advantages of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-hdEEG) over other current techniques of brain imaging. Methods ... [more ▼]

Background: This review discusses the advantages of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-hdEEG) over other current techniques of brain imaging. Methods and results: Its application was reviewed, focusing particularly on disorders of consciousness, in the perspective of recent theories of consciousness. Assessment of non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness remains a clinical challenge and objective measures of the level of consciousness are still needed. Current theories suggest that a key requirement for consciousness is the brain’s capacity to rapidly integrate information across different specialized cortical areas. TMS-EEG allows the stimulation of any given cortical area and the recording of the immediate electrical cortical response. This technique has recently been successfully employed to measure changes in brain complexity under physiological, pharmacological and pathological conditions. Conclusions: This suggests that TMS-EEG is a reliable tool to discriminate between conscious and unconscious patients at the single subject level. Future works are needed to validate and implement this technique as a clinical tool. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring consciousness in coma and related states
Di Perri, Carol; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in World Journal of Radiology (2014), 6(8),

Consciousness is a prismatic and ambiguous concept that still eludes any universal definition. Severe acquired brain injuries resulting in a disorder of consciousness (DOC) provide a model from which ... [more ▼]

Consciousness is a prismatic and ambiguous concept that still eludes any universal definition. Severe acquired brain injuries resulting in a disorder of consciousness (DOC) provide a model from which insights into consciousness can be drawn. A number of recent studies highlight the difficulty in making a diagnosis in patients with DOC based only on behavioral assessments. Here we aim to provide an overview of how neuroimaging techniques can help assess patients with DOC. Such techniques are expected to facilitate a more accurate understanding of brain function in states of unconsciousness and to improve the evaluation of the patient’s cognitive abilities by providing both diagnostic and prognostic indicators. [less ▲]

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See detailDetecting awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness using a hybrid brain–computer interface
Pan, Jiahui; Xie, Qiuyou; He, Yanbin et al

in Journal of Neural Engineering (2014)

Objective. The bedside detection of potential awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) currently relies only on behavioral observations and tests; however, the misdiagnosis rates in ... [more ▼]

Objective. The bedside detection of potential awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) currently relies only on behavioral observations and tests; however, the misdiagnosis rates in this patient group are historically relatively high. In this study, we proposed a visual hybrid brain–computer interface (BCI) combining P300 and steady-state evoked potential (SSVEP) responses to detect awareness in severely brain injured patients. Approach. Four healthy subjects, seven DOC patients who were in a vegetative state (VS, n = 4) or minimally conscious state (MCS, n = 3), and one locked-in syndrome (LIS) patient attempted a command-following experiment. In each experimental trial, two photos were presented to each patient; one was the patientʼs own photo, and the other photo was unfamiliar. The patients were instructed to focus on their own or the unfamiliar photos. The BCI system determined which photo the patient focused on with both P300 and SSVEP detections. Main results. Four healthy subjects, one of the 4 VS, one of the 3 MCS, and the LIS patient were able to selectively attend to their own or the unfamiliar photos (classification accuracy, 66–100%). Two additional patients (one VS and one MCS) failed to attend the unfamiliar photo (50–52%) but achieved significant accuracies for their own photo (64–68%). All other patients failed to show any significant response to commands (46–55%). Significance. Through the hybrid BCI system, command following was detected in four healthy subjects, two of 7 DOC patients, and one LIS patient. We suggest that the hybrid BCI system could be used as a supportive bedside tool to detect awareness in patients with DOC. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Glasgow Coma Scale: time for critical reappraisal?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Bodart, Olivier ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg

in Lancet Neurology (2014), Vol 13

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See detailHow Does Your Formulation of Lesion-Induced States of Diminished Consciousness Fit with AIM? Do You Suppose That Brain Stem Damage Affects Activation (A) and Modulation (M)?
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in J. Allan Hobson, Nicholas Tranquillo (Ed.) Dream Consciousness: A New Approach to the Brain and Its Mind (2014)

Allan Hobson’s AIM model (Hobson, 1998) is build according to three main dimensions. The first component, Activation, describes brain’s activation processes and is closely linked to the level of ... [more ▼]

Allan Hobson’s AIM model (Hobson, 1998) is build according to three main dimensions. The first component, Activation, describes brain’s activation processes and is closely linked to the level of consciousness. According to the model, the brain is highly active in wakefulness and REM sleep but will show much less activity during NREM sleep. The second component, Input/output gateway, controls the inhibition of external stimuli. When slowly falling asleep, the gateway shuts down and inhibits the external stimuli; the brain is no longer involved in processing external perceptions. Then the brain starts its oniric phase and the focus switches to internal inputs. Finally, the third dimension, Modulation, refers to the different ways of cognitive processing (executive functions), judgment, volition and memory. According to the model, those cognitive processes are lacking in REM sleep (i.e., the brain cannot keep a record of its conscious experience during dreaming as opposed to waking state) because of the changes between the aminergic system (norepinephrine and serotonin; dominant in waking but ineffective in REM sleep) and the cholinergic system (acetylcholine; unfettered in REM sleep). These three dimensions maintain a dynamic and reciprocal interaction over the sleep-wake cycle’s variations (wakefulness, NREM and REM sleep) and each of them can be expressed with lower or higher intensities depending on the level of consciousness. [less ▲]

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