References of "Laureys, Steven"
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See detailAltered functional brain connectivity in patients with visually induced dizziness
Van Ombergen, Angelique; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Jillings, Steven et al

in NeuroImage (2017), 14

Background: Vestibular patients occasionally report aggravation or triggering of their symptoms by visual stimuli, which is called visually induced dizziness (VID). These patients therefore experience ... [more ▼]

Background: Vestibular patients occasionally report aggravation or triggering of their symptoms by visual stimuli, which is called visually induced dizziness (VID). These patients therefore experience dizziness, discomfort, disorientation and postural unsteadiness. The underlying pathophysiology of VID is still poorly understood. Objective: The aimof the current explorative study was to gain a first insight in the underlying neural aspects of VID. Methods:We included 10 VID patients and 10 healthymatched controls, all ofwhich underwent a resting state fMRI scan session. Changes in functional connectivitywere explored bymeans of the intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC). Seed-based analysis was subsequently performed in visual and vestibular seeds. Results: We found a decreased functional connectivity in the right central operculum (superior temporal gyrus), as well as increased functional connectivity in the occipital pole in VID patients as compared to controls in a hypothesis-free analysis. A weaker functional connectivity between the thalamus and most of the right putamen was measured in VID patients in comparison to controls in a seed-based analysis. Furthermore, also by means of a seed-based analysis, a decreased functional connectivity between the visual associative area and the left parahippocampal gyrus was found in VID patients. Additionally,we found increased functional connectivity between thalamus and occipital and cerebellar areas in the VID patients, as well as between the associative visual cortex and both middle frontal gyrus and precuneus. Conclusions:We found alterations in the visual and vestibular cortical network in VID patients that could underlie the typical VID symptoms such as a worsening of their vestibular symptoms when being exposed to challenging visual stimuli. These preliminary findings provide the first insights into the underlying functional brain connectivity in VID patients. Future studies should extend these findings by employing larger sample sizes, by investigating specific task-based paradigms in these patients and by exploring the implications for treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of coma-recovery scale-revised signs of consciousness in patients in minimally conscious state
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Azzolini, Deborah et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2017)

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See detailObjective assessment of visual pursuit in patients with disorders of consciousness: an exploratory study.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Hoyoux, Thomas; Langohr, Thomas et al

in Journal of Neurology (2017)

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See detailTracking dynamic interactions between structural and functional connectivity: a TMS/EEG-dMRI study
Amico, Enrico; Bodart, Olivier ULiege; Rosanova, Mario et al

in Brain connectivity (2017)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with neuroimaging techniques allows to measure the effects of a direct perturbation of the brain. When coupled to high density electroencephalography ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with neuroimaging techniques allows to measure the effects of a direct perturbation of the brain. When coupled to high density electroencephalography (TMS/hd-EEG), TMS pulses revealed electrophysiological signatures of different cortical modules in health and disease. However, the neural underpinnings of these signatures remain unclear. Here, by applying multimodal analyses of cortical response to TMS recordings and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography, we investigated the relationship between functional and structural features of different cortical modules in a cohort of awake healthy volunteers. For each subject we computed directed functional connectivity interactions between cortical areas from the source reconstructed TMS/hd- EEG recordings and correlated them with the correspondent structural connectivity matrix extracted from dMRI tractography, in three different frequency bands (alpha, beta, gamma) and two sites of stimulation (left precuneus and left premotor). Each stimulated area appeared to mainly respond to TMS by being functionally elicited in specific frequency bands, i.e. beta for precuneus and gamma for premotor. We also observed a temporary decrease in the whole-brain correlation between directed functional connectivity and structural connectivity after TMS in all frequency bands. Notably, when focusing on the stimulated areas only, we found that the structurefunction correlation significantly increases over time in the premotor area contralateral to TMS. Our study points out the importance of taking into account the major role played by different cortical oscillations when investigating the mechanisms for integration and segregation of information in the human brain. [less ▲]

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See detailFalse memory susceptibility in coma survivors with and without a near-death experience
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege et al

in Psychological Research (2017)

It has been postulated that memories of neardeath experiences (NDEs) could be (at least in part) reconstructions based on experiencers’ (NDErs) previous knowledge and could be built as a result of the ... [more ▼]

It has been postulated that memories of neardeath experiences (NDEs) could be (at least in part) reconstructions based on experiencers’ (NDErs) previous knowledge and could be built as a result of the individual’s attempt to interpret the confusing experience. From the point of view of the experiencer, NDE memories are perceived as being unrivalled memories due to its associated rich phenomenology. However, the scientific literature devoted to the cognitive functioning of NDErs in general, and their memory performance in particular, is rather limited. This study examined NDErs’ susceptibility to false memories using the Deese–Roediger–McDermott (DRM) paradigm. We included 20 NDErs who reported having had their experience in the context of a life-threatening event (Greyson NDE scale total score ≥7/32) and 20 volunteers (matched for age, gender, education level, and time since brain insult) who reported a life-threatening event but without a NDE. Both groups were presented with DRM lists for a recall task during which they were asked to assign “Remember/Know/Guess” judgements to any recalled response. In addition, they were later asked to complete a post-recall test designed to obtain estimates of activation and monitoring of critical lures. Results demonstrated that NDErs and volunteers were equally likely to produce false memories, but that NDErs recalled them more frequently associated with compelling illusory recollection. Of particular interest, analyses of activation and monitoring estimates suggest that NDErs and volunteers groups were equally likely to think of critical lures, but source monitoring was less successful in NDErs compared to volunteers. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping the functional connectome traits of levels of consciousness
Amico, Enrico; Marinazzo, Daniele; Di Perri, Carol ULiege et al

in NeuroImage (2017)

Examining task-free functional connectivity (FC) in the human brain offers insights on how spontaneous integration and segregation of information relate to human cognition, and how this organization may ... [more ▼]

Examining task-free functional connectivity (FC) in the human brain offers insights on how spontaneous integration and segregation of information relate to human cognition, and how this organization may be altered in different conditions, and neurological disorders. This is particularly relevant for patients in disorders of consciousness (DOC) following severe acquired brain damage and coma, one of the most devastating conditions in modern medical care. We present a novel data-driven methodology, connICA, which implements Independent Component Analysis (ICA) for the extraction of robust independent FC patterns (FC-traits) from a set of individual functional connectomes, without imposing any a priori data stratification into groups. We here apply connICA to investigate associations between network-traits derived from task-free FC and cognitive features that define levels of consciousness. Three main independent FC-traits were identified and linked to consciousness-related clinical features. The first one represents the functional configuration of an "awake resting" brain, and is associated to the level of arousal. The second FC-trait reflects the disconnection of the visual and sensory-motor connectivity patterns and relates to the ability of communicating with the external environment. The third FC-trait isolates the connectivity pattern encompassing the fronto-parietal and the default-mode network areas as well as the interaction between left and right hemisphere, which are also associated to the awareness of the self and its surroundings. Each FC-trait represents a distinct functional process with a role in the degradation of conscious states in functional brain networks, shedding further light on the functional subcircuits that get disrupted in severe brain-damage. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobal disorders of consciousness.
Stender, Johan; Laureys, Steven ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege

in Velmans, Max; Schneider, Susan (Eds.) The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness (2017)

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See detailFunctional Connectivity Substrates for tDCS Response in Minimally Conscious State Patients
Cavaliere, Carlo ULiege; Aiello, Marco; Di Perri, Carol ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience (2016)

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique recently employed in disorders of consciousness, and determining a transitory recovery of signs of consciousness in almost half ... [more ▼]

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique recently employed in disorders of consciousness, and determining a transitory recovery of signs of consciousness in almost half of minimally conscious state (MCS) patients. Although the rising evidences about its possible role in the treatment of many neurological and psychiatric conditions exist, no evidences exist about brain functional connectivity substrates underlying tDCS response. We retrospectively evaluated resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of 16 sub-acute and chronic MCS patients (6 tDCS responders) who successively received a single left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) tDCS in a double-blind randomized cross-over trial. A seed-based approach for regions of left extrinsic control network (ECN) and default-mode network (DMN) was performed. tDCS responders showed an increased left intra-network connectivity for regions co-activated with left DLPFC, and significantly with left inferior frontal gyrus. Non-responders (NR) MCS patients showed an increased connectivity between left DLPFC and midline cortical structures, including anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Our findings suggest that a prior high connectivity with regions belonging to ECN can facilitate transitory recovery of consciousness in a subgroup of MCS patients that underwent tDCS treatment. Therefore, resting state-fMRI could be very valuable in detecting the neuronal conditions necessary for tDCS to improve behavior in MCS. [less ▲]

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See detailResting-state Network-specific Breakdown of Functional Connectivity during Ketamine Alteration of Consciousness in Volunteers
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Demertzi, Athina ULiege et al

in Anesthesiology (2016), 125(5), 873-878

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control ... [more ▼]

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control network, salience network (SALn), auditory network, sensorimotor network (SMn), and visual network sustain mentation. Ketamine modifies consciousness differently from other agents, producing psychedelic dreaming and no apparent interaction with the environment. The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore ketamine-induced changes in RSNs connectivity. Methods: Fourteen healthy volunteers received stepwise intravenous infusions of ketamine up to loss of responsiveness. Because of agitation, data from six subjects were excluded from analysis. RSNs connectivity was compared between absence of ketamine (wake state [W1]), light ketamine sedation, and ketamine-induced unresponsiveness (deep sedation [S2]). Results: Increasing the depth of ketamine sedation from W1 to S2 altered DMn and SALn connectivity and suppressed the anticorrelated activity between DMn and other brain regions. During S2, DMn connectivity, particularly between the medial prefrontal cortex and the remaining network (effect size β [95% CI]: W1 = 0.20 [0.18 to 0.22]; S2 = 0.07 [0.04 to 0.09]), and DMn anticorrelated activity (e.g., right sensory cortex: W1 = −0.07 [−0.09 to −0.04]; S2 = 0.04 [0.01 to 0.06]) were broken down. SALn connectivity was nonuniformly suppressed (e.g., left parietal operculum: W1 = 0.08 [0.06 to 0.09]; S2 = 0.05 [0.02 to 0.07]). Executive control networks, auditory network, SMn, and visual network were minimally affected. Conclusions: Ketamine induces specific changes in connectivity within and between RSNs. Breakdown of frontoparietal DMn connectivity and DMn anticorrelation and sensory and SMn connectivity preservation are common to ketamine and propofol-induced alterations of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailFunction–structure connectivity in patients with severe brain injury as measured by MRI-DWI and FDG-PET
Annen, Jitka ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Ziegler, Erik et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2016), 37(11), 3707-3720

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See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Annen, Jitka ULiege; Aubinet, Charlène ULiege et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Citerio, G.; Smith, M.; Kofke, A. (Eds.) Oxford Textbook of neurocritical care (2016)

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See detailSleep, Coma, Vegetative and Minimally 4 Conscious States
Di Perri, Carol ULiege; Cavaliere, Carlo; Bodart, Olivier ULiege et al

in Sleep Disorders Medicine (2016)

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See detailStratification of unresponsive patients by an independently validated index of brain complexity
Casarotto, Silvia; Commanducci, Angel; Rosanova, Mario et al

in Annals of Neurology (2016), 80(5),

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See detailCortical reorganization in an astronaut's brain after long-duration spaceflight.
Demertzi, Athina ULiege; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Tomilovskaya, Elena et al

in Brain Structure & Function (2016), 221(5), 2873-2876

To date, hampered physiological function after exposure to microgravity has been primarily attributed to deprived peripheral neuro-sensory systems. For the first time, this study elucidates alterations in ... [more ▼]

To date, hampered physiological function after exposure to microgravity has been primarily attributed to deprived peripheral neuro-sensory systems. For the first time, this study elucidates alterations in human brain function after long-duration spaceflight. More specifically, we found significant differences in resting-state functional connectivity between motor cortex and cerebellum, as well as changes within the default mode network. In addition, the cosmonaut showed changes in the supplementary motor areas during a motor imagery task. These results highlight the underlying neural basis for the observed physiological deconditioning due to spaceflight and are relevant for future interplanetary missions and vestibular patients. [less ▲]

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