References of "Laureys, Steven"
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See detailSpasticity in stroke patients with disorders of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Chatelle, Camille ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

Poster (2012, October)

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See detailFunctional connectivity changes in hypnotic state measured by fMRI
Demertzi, Athina ULiege; Soddu, Andrea ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

Conference (2012, September 06)

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See detailGlobal breakdown in resting state networks fMRI connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness
Demertzi, Athina ULiege; Soddu, Andrea ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

Conference (2012, July 05)

Patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC: brain death, coma, vegetative/unresponsive, minimally conscious state) show reduced resting state fMRI connectivity in a default mode network as a function ... [more ▼]

Patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC: brain death, coma, vegetative/unresponsive, minimally conscious state) show reduced resting state fMRI connectivity in a default mode network as a function of the level of consciousness.1, 2 Here, we aimed to assess resting state fMRI connectivity in multiple cerebral networks. We further aimed to correlate clinical ͞pain͟scales scores (i.e., Nociception Coma Scale, NCS3) with the functional integrity of the pain-related salience network4 because the issue of pain in DOC is of particular ethical interest.5Methods: 300 fMRI resting state scans were obtained in 28 patients (11 minimally conscious, 12 "vegetative͟/unresponsive, 5 coma) and 22 controls. Seven seed regions were used to identify functional connectivity in the default mode, left and right frontoparietal, salience, sensorimotor, auditory, and visual networks. For salience network, a regression analysis was performed with patients’NCS total score. Results: A group-level correlation between resting state functional connectivity and the level of consciousness was identified for all studied networks. Additionally, patients’ NCS scores showed a positive correlation with functional connectivity in the salience network’s anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conclusions: We observed group-level functional connectivity decreases in both primary (visual, auditory) and higher-order associative networks (default mode, right and left fronto-parietal, salience, sensorimotor) possibly accounting for patients diminished consciousness capacities.6 The observed positive correlation between the NCS scores and ACC salience network activity reflects nociception-related processes in these patients measured in the absence of an external stimulus. Our results emphasize the clinical importance of multiple fMRI resting state networks to consciousness. References 1. Boly M, et al. (2009). Hum Brain Mapp 30:2393-2400.2. Vanhaudenhuyse A, et al. (2009). Brain 133:161-171. 3. Schnakers C, et al. (2010). Pain 148:215-219.4. Ploner M, et al. (2010). Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:355-360.5. Demertzi A, et al. (2012). Neuroethics:1-14.6. Baars B, et al. (2003). Trends Neurosci 26:671-675. Preference: Talk Track: Clinical [less ▲]

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See detailMindsight: Diagnostics in Disorders of Consciousness
Guldenmund, Justus Pieter ULiege; Stender, Johan; Heine, Lizette ULiege et al

in Critical Care Research and Practice (2012)

Diagnosis of patients with disorders of consciousness (comprising coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state) has long been dependent on unstandardized ... [more ▼]

Diagnosis of patients with disorders of consciousness (comprising coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state) has long been dependent on unstandardized behavioral tests. The arrival of standardized behavioral tools, and especially the Coma Recovery Scale revised, uncovered a high rate of misdiagnosis. Ancillary techniques, such as brain imaging and electrophysiological examinations, are ever more often being deployed to aid in the search for remaining consciousness. They are used to look for brain activity patterns similar to those found in healthy controls. The development of portable and cheaper devices will make these techniques more widely available. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalisation to auditory stimulation in coma.
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Schnakers, Caroline et al

Conference (2012, June)

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See detailInvestigating the tinnitus brain using resting-state fMRI
Maudoux, Audrey ULiege; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk et al

Conference (2012, June)

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See detailAuditory Resting-State Network Connectivity in Tinnitus: a Functionnal MRI Study.
MAUDOUX, Audrey ULiege; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULiege; CABAY, Jean-Evrard ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2012)

The underlying functional neuroanatomy of tinnitus remains poorly understood. Few studies have focused on functional cerebral connectivity changes in tinnitus patients. The aim of this study was to test ... [more ▼]

The underlying functional neuroanatomy of tinnitus remains poorly understood. Few studies have focused on functional cerebral connectivity changes in tinnitus patients. The aim of this study was to test if functional MRI ‘‘resting-state’’ connectivity patterns in auditory network differ between tinnitus patients and normal controls. Thirteen chronic tinnitus subjects and fifteen age-matched healthy controls were studied on a 3 tesla MRI. Connectivity was investigated using independent component analysis and an automated component selection approach taking into account the spatial and temporal properties of each component. Connectivity in extra-auditory regions such as brainstem, basal ganglia/NAc, cerebellum, parahippocampal, right prefrontal, parietal, and sensorimotor areas was found to be increased in tinnitus subjects. The right primary auditory cortex, left prefrontal, left fusiform gyrus, and bilateral occipital regions showed a decreased connectivity in tinnitus. These results show that there is a modification of cortical and subcortical functional connectivity in tinnitus encompassing attentional, mnemonic, and emotional networks. Our data corroborate the hypothesized implication of non-auditory regions in tinnitus physiopathology and suggest that various regions of the brain seem involved in the persistent awareness of the phenomenon as well as in the development of the associated distress. leading to disabling chronic tinnitus. [less ▲]

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See detailROLE OF ACTIVE ERP PARADIGMS IN AWARENESS DETECTION IN NON RESPONSIVE PATIENTS
Lugo, Zulay; Lesenfants, Damien ULiege; Lehembre, Remy ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the 1st international DECODER Workshop (2012, April)

The role of active vs. passive ERP paradigms in disorders of consciousness is assessed in this case study of a LIS patient. Results show that despite absent P3 in a passive auditory task, the patient ... [more ▼]

The role of active vs. passive ERP paradigms in disorders of consciousness is assessed in this case study of a LIS patient. Results show that despite absent P3 in a passive auditory task, the patient displayed significant differences in the active task. This study shows the importance of using a large battery of tests when assessing DOC patients. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysiological indices of top-down attentional processing in minimally conscious patients : an ERP study.
Schnakers, C.; Lovstad, M.; Boly, M. et al

Conference (2012, March)

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See detailThe problem of assessing consciousness in brain-damaged patients with aphasia
Schnakers, C.; Bessou, H.; Giacino, J.T. et al

Conference (2012, March)

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See detailFrom armchair to wheelchair: How patients with a locked-in syndrome integrate bodily changes in experienced identity.
Nizzi, M. C.; Demertzi, Athina ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2012), 21

Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and ... [more ▼]

Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome (LIS) suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals answered a 15-items questionnaire targeting: (A) global evaluation of identity, (B) body representation and (C) experienced meaning in life. In patients, self-reported identity was correlated with B and C. Patients differed with controls in C. These results suggest that the paralyzed body remains a strong component of patients' experienced identity, that patients can adjust to objectives changes perceived as meaningful and that caregivers fail in predicting patients' experience. [less ▲]

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See detailResting state networks and consciousness Alterations of multiple resting state network connectivity in physiological, pharmacological and pathological consciousness states
Heine, Lizette ULiege; Soddu, Andrea ULiege; Gomez, Francisco et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2012), 3

In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological ... [more ▼]

In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological (sleep), pharmacological (anesthesia) and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed RSNs were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly in terms of hypothesis-driven seed-based correlation analysis and data-driven independent components analysis approaches. Finally, we attempt to contextualize our discussion within theoretical frameworks of conscious processes. We think that this “lesion” approach allows us to better determine the necessary conditions under which normal conscious cognition takes place. At the clinical level, we acknowledge the technical merits of the resting state paradigm. Indeed, fast and easy acquisitions are preferable to activation paradigms in clinical populations. Finally, we emphasize the need to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of fMRI resting state measurements in non-communicating brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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