References of "Lassois, Ludivine"
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See detailImpact of the extension of black leaf streak disease on banana susceptibility to post-harvest diseases
Ewané, Cécile Annie; Chillet, Marc; Castelan, Florence et al

in Fruits (2013), 68(5), 351-365

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See detailThermotherapy, chemotherapy and meristem culture in banana
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Van den Houwe, Ines et al

in Lambardi, M.; Ozudogru, A. E.; Jain, S. M. (Eds.) Protocols for micropropagation of selected economically-important horticultural plants (2013)

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See detailThe susceptibility of bananas to crown rot disease is influenced by geographical and seasonal effects
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology = Revue Canadienne de Phytopathologie (2013), 35(1), 27-36

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of ... [more ▼]

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of banana fruits to crown rot is influenced by many pre-harvest factors. The aim of this study was to improve on the methodology for the evaluation of fruit susceptibility and to verify whether cultivation areas in Cameroon as well as seasonal variations have an influence on the susceptibility to crown rot. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated on a monthly basis throughout a year (including the dry and rainy seasons) in three banana plantations located at very different agro-ecological conditions (two in a lowland area and one in a highland area). Fruit susceptibility was determined through an internal necrotic surface (INS) assessment after artificial inoculation with C. musae. The standardization of post-inoculation environmental conditions enabled more reliable INS assessments. Fruit susceptibility was found to be significantly influenced by cultivation area (P<0.001) since fruits grown in low altitude (Dia-dia, Koumba, 80 m) were more susceptible than fruits grown in high altitude (Ekona, 500 m). Although no seasonal effect was observed (P=0.075), there was a highly significant date effect (P<0.001). This was specifically the case in low altitude plantations where fruit susceptibility was higher for some harvest dates within the rainy season. In Ekona, fruit grade and number of leaves on the banana plant were found to be significantly higher than in the two other locations, while black leaf streak disease severity was significantly lower. The potential relationship with fruit susceptibility is fully discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic diversity and structure within 6 European apple germplasm collections assessed by microsatellite markers
Durel, Charles-Eric; Denancé, C; Ravon, E et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailInvolvement of phenolic compounds in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. A review.
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(3), 393-404

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See detailEtude de la diversité génétique et de la structure d'une collection française de pommiers
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Denancé, Caroline; Ravon, Elisa et al

Scientific conference (2012)

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See detailAlternaria jacinthicola, a new fungal species causing blight leaf disease on water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Martius) Solms-Laubach)
Dagno, Karim ULg; Crovadore, Julien; Lefort, François et al

in Journal of Yeast and Fungal Research (2011), 2(7), 99-105

Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) causes environmental, agricultural and health problems in Mali. This is particularly severe in the District of Bamako and the irrigation systems of the “Office du ... [more ▼]

Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) causes environmental, agricultural and health problems in Mali. This is particularly severe in the District of Bamako and the irrigation systems of the “Office du Niger”area. During two years survey for fungal pathogens of water hyacinth infested areas, isolate Mlb684 was collected from diseased plant. This fungal isolate was identified as a potential mycoherbicide for sustainable management for water hyacinth. The aim of this study was to characterize isolate Mlb684. The characterization was based on a morphological description and a DNA sequence analysis. Various genes amplified from isolate Mlb684 were compared to those existing in Genbank. These genes were 18S ribosomal rDNA gene, ITS rDNA gene, elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1a) gene, calmodulin and actin genes. DNA sequence comparisons and morphological description provided enough evidences to show that isolate Mlb684 belonged to the Alternaria genus and was distinct from any other known Alternaria species. Based on these evidences, the new fungal isolate was called “Alternaria jacinthicola Dagno & M.H. Jijakli”. A specimen culture has been deposited in the Gembloux Agro Bio Tech Plant Pathology unit fungal collection, with Mlb684 reference and in the Industrial Fungal and Yeast Collection (BCCM/MUCL, Belgium) under the accession number: MUCL 53159 and all DNA sequences were deposited in GenBank (NCBI). [less ▲]

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See detailLa gestion intégrée des systèmes de production bananière
Lassois, Ludivine ULg

Scientific conference (2011, July)

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See detailPre-harvest conditions affect the banana susceptibility to post-hervest disease.
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Ewane, Cecile; Forret, Marie et al

Conference (2011, May 24)

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See detailVolatile organic compounds of the roots of barley and their role in the rhizosphere
Fiers, Marie ULg; Barsics, Fanny ULg; Camerman, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 24)

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates ... [more ▼]

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates. Very few researches have been completed concerning belowground volatiles released into the rhizosphere despite their potential capacity to carry information between organisms. The Rhizovol project, started in autumn 2010, involves 5 different units of Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech collectively studying the production of belowground volatiles by barley roots underlying various biotic interactions in the rhizosphere. Some preliminary results of each partner of the project will be presented. To achieve this goal, analytical methods allowing the sampling, separation, identification and quantification of belowground volatile compounds have to be developed, taking into account their potential modifications in the rhizosphere once released by the roots. They enable the subsequent characterization and study of the interactions between barley and its rhizospheric partners chosen for this study. These interactions imply three types of organisms: beneficial organisms, pathogenic agents and plant and insect pests. Beneficial organisms can promote the growth of barley by the emission of volatiles; on the other hand barley can support their growth and metabolism. These phenomenons will be assessed by the study of 19 strains of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR). Three pathogenic agents - two fungi (Fusarium culmorum and Cochliobolus sativus) and one virus (Barley yellow dwarf virus) - were chosen as they are known to cause various diseases on barley, especially on roots. The attractive or repellent effects of barley root volatiles on the pathogenic agents or their vectors, as well as the effect of volatiles on the diseases evolution will be evaluated. The project also includes several types of pests such as plants and insects. Plants can compete with barley for space and nutrients through volatile interactions. This will be assessed by the study of autotoxicity by barley itself and allelopathy with 8 weeds and a hemiparasitic plant (Rhinanthus minor). The effects of barley volatiles can also impact the severity of the attacks by insects. This part will be conducted with wireworms as they represent worldwide known pests, and aphids, through their viral vector role. Eventually, as soil characteristics can strongly influence the diffusion of volatile compounds, the diffusion behaviour of the identified volatile biomolecules through the soil will be modelled. Tritrophic interactions (e.g. insect-plant-pathogenic fungi) will be studied based on each bitrophic interaction results. Over-all, the Rhizovol project aims at improving the knowledge of interactions mediated by volatile compounds in the rhizosphere and at establishing new biocontrol methods that could contribute to integrated disease and pest management systems. [less ▲]

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See detailCatecholamine biosynthesis pathway potentially involved in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Frettinger, Patrick et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2011), 76(4), 591-601

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See detailApple core collection based on SSR data for genome-wide association
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Durel, Charles-Eric

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailIdentification of genes involved in the response of banana to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Frettinger, Patrick; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions [=MPMI] (2011), 24(1), 143-153

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See detailCrown rot of banana: Preharvest factors involved in postharvest disease development and integrated control methods
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg; Chillet, M. et al

in Plant Disease (2010), 94(6), 648-658

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See detailHand position on the bunch and source-sink ratio influence the banana fruit susceptibility to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Bastiaanse, H.; Chillet, M. et al

in Annals of Applied Biology (2010), 156

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was ... [more ▼]

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was suggested that this depends on environmental preharvest factors. However, little is known about the preharvest factors influencing this susceptibility. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extent to which fruit filling characteristics during growth and the fruit development stage influence the banana susceptibility to crown rot. This involved evaluating the influence of (a) the fruit position at different levels of the banana bunch (hands) and (b) changing the source–sink ratio (So–Si ratio), on the fruit susceptibility to crown rot. The fruit susceptibility was determined by measuring the internal necrotic surface (INS) after artificial inoculation of Colletotrichum musae. A linear correlation (r = −0.95) was found between the hand position on the bunch and the INS. The So–Si ratio was found to influence the pomological characteristics of the fruits and their susceptibility to crown rot. Fruits of bunches from which six hands were removed (two hands remaining on the bunch) proved to be significantly less susceptible to crown rot (INS = 138.3 mm2) than those from bunches with eight hands (INS = 237.9 mm2). The banana susceptibility to crown rot is thus likely to be influenced by the fruit development stage and filling characteristics. The present results highlight the importance of standardising hand sampling on a bunch when testing fruit susceptibility to crown rot. They also show that hand removal in the field has advantages in the context of integrated pest management, making it possible to reduce fruit susceptibility to crown rot while increasing fruit size. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated control of crown rot of banana with Candida oleophila strain O, calcium chloride and modified atmosphere packaging
Bastiaanse, H.; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lassois, Ludivine ULg et al

in Biological Control (2010), 53

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 ULg)