References of "Lancellotti, Patrizio"
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See detailEight years of the EACVI's grant programme: existing developments, impact, and steps forward.
Surkova, Elena; Muraru, Denisa; Grapsa, Julia et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(11), 1178-9

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See detailMALADIE CORONAIRE ET INSUFFISANCE CARDIAQUE : APPROCHE GENOTYPIQUE DU TRAITEMENT.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; ANCION, Arnaud ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(5-6), 282-5

Phenotypic approach of the treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure used in prospective randomized trials has contributed to significantly improve patieni prognosis. However, gene ... [more ▼]

Phenotypic approach of the treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure used in prospective randomized trials has contributed to significantly improve patieni prognosis. However, gene polymorphisms have been shown to be able to alter treatment efficacy with anti-platelets, beta-blockers or ACE-inhibitors in these settings. As suggested by several studies, therapeutic approaches based on genotype should contribute to personalize treatments with better efficacy and safety. [less ▲]

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See detailElevated heart rate at 24-36 h after admission and in-hospital mortality in acute in non-arrhythmic heart failure
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; ANCION, Arnaud ULg; Magne, Julien et al

in International journal of cardiology (2015), 182C

BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF) but little is known about its prognostic impact in acute setting. The main aim of the present study ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF) but little is known about its prognostic impact in acute setting. The main aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between resting heart rate obtained 24-36h after admission for acute non-arrhythmic HF and in-hospital mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the association of heart rate with in-hospital mortality in a cohort of 712 patients admitted for acute HF. None of the patients had significant arrhythmias, required invasive ventilation, or presented with acute coronary syndrome or primary valvular disease. Forty patients (5.6%) died during the hospital stay. Those patients were significantly older (78+/-9 vs. 72+/-12years; p=0.0021), had higher heart rate (92+/-22 vs. 78+/-18bpm; p<0.0001), NT pro-BNP (p=0.0005), creatinine (p=0.023), were often diabetics (p=0.026) and had lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p<0.05). There was a significant graded relationship between the increase in mortality rate and tertile of heart rate (p<0.01). With multivariable analysis, age (p=0.037), heart rate (p<0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001), prior ischemic heart disease (p=0.02) and creatinine (p=0.019) emerged as independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. After adjusting for predictors of poor prognosis, patients in the highest heart rate tertile had worst outcomes when compared with those in the lowest heart rate group (p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Higher heart rate 24-36h after admission for acute non-arrhythmic HF is associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Early targeting of elevated heart rate might represent a complementary therapeutic challenge. [less ▲]

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See detailPositron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Device Infective Endocarditis: Ready for Prime Time
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Habib, Gilbert; Oury, Cécile ULg et al

in Circulation (2015)

Over the last decade there has been a remarkable increase in prosthetic heart valve replacement and cardiac implantable electronic device utilization. Although capable of improving the quality and ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade there has been a remarkable increase in prosthetic heart valve replacement and cardiac implantable electronic device utilization. Although capable of improving the quality and quantity of life of patients suffering from severe valvular heart disease or rhythm disorders, they are both subject to potentially life-threatening infection involving the endocardium, referred to as device infective endocarditis (DIE)1,2. The rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) ranges from 1-6% to 15%, being higher in revision surgery1. The infection usually involves the junction between the sewing ring and the annulus, leading to perivalvular abscess, dehiscence, pseudo-aneurysms, and fistulae, or the leaflets of the prosthesis, leading to vegetations, cusp rupture, and perforation. Cardiac device-related infective endocarditis (CDRIE), to be distinguished from local device infection (pocket/generator), is defined as an infection involving the electrode leads, cardiac valve leaflets, or endocardial surface. An incidence of 1.4 per 1000 device-years of definite CDRIE has been reported3. DIE may occur at anytime, being related to surgery only in early cases. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Cardiology Core Syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).
Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H. et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a ... [more ▼]

The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. [less ▲]

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See detailCentres of excellence in heart valve surgery: are there standards for best practice?
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Dulgheru, Raluca; Sakalihasan, Natzi ULg

in Open heart (2015), 2(1), 000282

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See detailLes antiplaquettaires : quoi de neuf ?
Oury, Cécile ULg; Rahmouni, Souad ULg; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (2015)

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See detailThe year 2014 in the European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging. Part I.
Edvardsen, Thor; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Saraste, Antti et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(7), 712-8

The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. It has already gained an impressive impact factor of 3.669 during its first 2 ... [more ▼]

The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. It has already gained an impressive impact factor of 3.669 during its first 2 years. In two articles, we will summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year. Part I of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging, and Part II will focus on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropean Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.
Badano, Luigi P.; Miglioranza, Marcelo H.; Edvardsen, Thor et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16

The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the ... [more ▼]

The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent echocardiographic studies should be interpreted in comparison with the data obtained from the 6-month study. An echocardiographic study, which shows no change from the baseline study, has a high negative predictive value for GR. There is no single systolic or diastolic parameter that can be reliably used to diagnose GR. However, in case several parameters are abnormal, the likelihood of GR increases. When an abnormality is detected, careful revision of images of the present and baseline study (side-by-side) is highly recommended. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) is a suitable parameter to diagnose subclinical allograft dysfunction, regardless of aetiology, by comparing the changes occurring during serial evaluations. Evaluation of GLS could be used in association with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) to characterize and monitor an acute GR or global dysfunction episode. RV size and function at baseline should be assessed using several parameters, which do not exclusively evaluate longitudinal function. At follow-up echocardiogram, all these parameters should be compared with the baseline values. 3DE may provide a more accurate and comprehensive assessment of RV size and function. Moreover, due to the unpredictable shape of the atria in transplanted patients, atrial volume should be measured using the discs' summation algorithm (biplane algorithm for the left atrium) or 3DE. Tricuspid regurgitation should be looked for and properly assessed in all echocardiographic studies. In case of significant changes in severity of tricuspid regurgitation during follow-up, a 2D/3D and colour Doppler assessment of its severity and mechanisms should be performed. Aortic and mitral valves should be evaluated according to current recommendations. Pericardial effusion should be serially evaluated regarding extent, location, and haemodynamic impact. In case of newly detected pericardial effusion, GR should be considered taking into account the overall echocardiographic assessment and patient evaluation. Dobutamine stress echocardiography might be a suitable alternative to routine coronary angiography to assess cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) at centres with adequate experience with the methodology. Coronary flow reserve and/or contrast infusion to assess myocardial perfusion might be combined with stress echocardiography to improve the accuracy of the test. In addition to its role in monitoring cardiac chamber function and in diagnosis the occurrence of GR and/or CAV, in experienced centres, echocardiography might be an alternative to fluoroscopy to guide EMB, particularly in children and young women, since echocardiography avoids repeated X-ray exposure, permits visualization of soft tissues and safer performance of biopsies of different RV regions. Finally, in addition to the indications about when and how to use echocardiography, the document also addresses the role of the other cardiovascular imaging modalities during follow-up of heart transplant patients. In patients with inadequate acoustic window and contraindication to contrast agents, pharmacological SPECT is an alternative imaging modality to detect CAV in heart transplant patients. However, in centres with adequate expertise, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in conjunction with coronary angiography with a baseline study at 4-6 weeks and at 1 year after heart transplant should be performed to exclude donor coronary artery disease, to detect rapidly progressive CAV, and to provide prognostic information. Despite the fact that coronary angiography is the current gold-standard method for the detection of CAV, the use of IVUS should also be considered when there is a discrepancy between non-invasive imaging tests and coronary angiography concerning the presence of CAV. In experienced centres, computerized tomography coronary angiography is a good alternative to coronary angiography to detect CAV. In patients with a persistently high heart rate, scanners that provide high temporal resolution, such as dual-source systems, provide better image quality. Finally, in patients with insufficient acoustic window, cardiac magnetic resonance is an alternative to echocardiography to assess cardiac chamber volumes and function and to exclude acute GR and CAV in a surveillance protocol. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 1: clinical trial design principles: A consensus document from the mitral valve academic research consortium.
Stone, Gregg W.; Vahanian, Alec S.; Adams, David H. et al

in European heart journal (2015), 36(29), 1851-77

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology ... [more ▼]

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommandations Europeennes concernant le diagnostic de l'embolie pulmonaire.
ANCION, Arnaud ULg; Melissopoulou, M.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(1), 17-21

This article summarizes the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, according to the European Society of Cardiology 2014 guidelines. In case of hemodynamic instability, bedside ... [more ▼]

This article summarizes the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, according to the European Society of Cardiology 2014 guidelines. In case of hemodynamic instability, bedside echocardiography is the most useful initial test. In case of hemodynamic stability, plasma D-dimers measurement represents the first step and computed tomographic angiography is the second line test, except if pulmonary embolism is likely; then, computed tomographic angiography is the first choice test. Otherwise, lung scintigraphy remains a valid option for patients with elevated D-dimers and a contraindication to computed tomography. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiovascular imaging practice in Europe: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Plonska-Gosciniak, Edyta; Garbi, Madalina et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(7), 697-702

The need for cardiovascular imaging (CVI) is expected to increase over the coming years due to the changes in CV disease epidemiology and ageing of the population. However, reliable statistics on CVI ... [more ▼]

The need for cardiovascular imaging (CVI) is expected to increase over the coming years due to the changes in CV disease epidemiology and ageing of the population. However, reliable statistics on CVI practice in Europe are lacking. Establishing the current status of the use of CVI across Europe has become the first comprehensive project of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiology Taskforce on CVI. In 2013, a survey with relevant information regarding CVI was sent to all National Imaging/Echocardiography Societies and Working Groups. Representatives from 41 countries returned the questionnaire. The present report provides key results of the survey, relating to existing education, training, certification and national accreditation programmes, healthcare organizations, and reimbursement systems. [less ▲]

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See detailEuroEcho-Imaging 2014: highlights.
Magne, Julien; Habib, Gilbert; Cosyns, Bernard et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(7), 703-711

The annual meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography (EuroEcho-Imaging) was held in Vienna, Austria. In the present paper, we present a summary of the 'Highlights' session.

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See detailCardioPulse: cardiac imaging of adult cancer patients on chemotherapy.
Galderisi, Maurizio; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg

in European heart journal (2015), 36(15), 889-90

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See detailLeft ventricular regional function and maximal exercise capacity in aortic stenosis.
DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULg; Magne, J.; DAVIN, Laurent ULg et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However, the relationship between left ventricular (LV) function and MEC has been relatively unexplored. We aimed to identify which echocardiographic parameters of LV systolic function can predict MEC in asymptomatic AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: Asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AS (n = 44, aortic valve area <1.5 cm2, 66 +/- 13 years, 75% of men) and preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF > 50%) were prospectively referred for resting echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise test. LV longitudinal strain (LS) of each myocardial segment was measured by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) from the apical (aLS) 4-, 2-, and 3-chamber views. An average value of the LS of the analysable segments was provided for each myocardial region: basal (bLS), mid (mLS), and aLS. LV circumferential and radial strains were measured from short-axis views. Peak VO2 was 20.1 +/- 5.8 mL/kg/min (median 20.7 mL/kg/min; range 7.2-32.3 mL/kg/min). According to the median of peak VO2, patients with reduced MEC were significantly older (P < 0.001) and more frequently females (P = 0.05). There were significant correlations between peak VO2 and age (r = -0.44), LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.35), LV stroke volume (r = 0.37), indexed stroke volume (r = 0.32), and E/e' ratio (r = -0.37, all P < 0.04). Parameters of AS severity and LVEF did not correlate with peak VO2 (P = NS for all). Among LV deformation parameters, bLS and mLS were significantly associated with peakVO2 (r = 0.43, P = 0.005, and r = 0.32, P = 0.04, respectively). With multivariable analysis, female gender (beta = 4.9; P = 0.008) and bLS (beta = 0.50; P = 0.03) were the only independent determinants (r2 = 0.423) of peak VO2. CONCLUSION: In asymptomatic AS, impaired LV myocardial longitudinal function determines reduced MEC. Basal LS was the only parameter of LV regional function independently associated with MEC. [less ▲]

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See detailValve Stress Echocardiography: A Practical Guide for Referral, Procedure, Reporting, and Clinical Implementation of Results From the HAVEC Group.
Garbi, Madalina; Chambers, John; Vannan, Mani A. et al

in JACC. Cardiovascular imaging (2015), 8(6), 724-736

Valve stress echocardiography (VSE) is increasingly used both within specialist valve clinics and within dedicated VSE services, mandating practical guidance for referral, procedure, reporting, and ... [more ▼]

Valve stress echocardiography (VSE) is increasingly used both within specialist valve clinics and within dedicated VSE services, mandating practical guidance for referral, procedure, reporting, and clinical implementation of results. Therefore, a didactic VSE guide was compiled based on current European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association valve disease management guidelines, review of existing evidence, and the authors' extensive experience with VSE. The VSE indications were grouped into 3 categories: symptoms despite nonsevere valve disease, asymptomatic severe valve disease, and valve disease with reduced left ventricular systolic function. The aim of the test, the type of stress to be used, the sequence of image acquisition, the information to be included in the report, and the implication of the VSE results for clinical management were described for every indication and summarized in user-friendly tables. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 1: Clinical Trial Design Principles: A Consensus Document From the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.
Stone, Gregg W.; Vahanian, Alec S.; Adams, David H. et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2015), 66(3), 278-307

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology ... [more ▼]

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. [less ▲]

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See detailMITRAL VALVE REGURGITATION
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; MAGNE, Julien

in ZAMORANO, JOSE LUIS; BAX, JEROEN; KNUUTI, JUHANI (Eds.) et al THE ESC TEXTBOOK OF CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING - SECOND EDITION (2015)

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