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See detailMelanin-concentrating hormone and immune function
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Harray, Sophie ULg et al

in Peptides (2009), 30

To date,melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) has been generally considered as peptide acting almost exclusively in the central nervous system. In the present paper, we revise the experimental evidence ... [more ▼]

To date,melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) has been generally considered as peptide acting almost exclusively in the central nervous system. In the present paper, we revise the experimental evidence, demonstrating that MCH and its receptors are expressed by cells of the immune system and directly influence the response of these cells in some circumstances. This therefore supports the idea that, as with other peptides, MCH could be considered as a modulator of the immune system. Moreover, we suggest that this could have important implications in several immune-mediated disorders and affirm that there is a clear need for further investigation [less ▲]

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See detailEFHC1 interacts with microtubules to regulate cell division and cortical development
de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Leon, Christine ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg et al

in Nature Neuroscience (2009), 12(10), 1266-74

Mutations in the EFHC1 gene are linked to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), one of the most frequent forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies. JME is associated with subtle alterations of cortical and ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the EFHC1 gene are linked to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), one of the most frequent forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies. JME is associated with subtle alterations of cortical and subcortical architecture, but the underlying pathological mechanism remains unknown. We found that EFHC1 is a microtubule-associated protein involved in the regulation of cell division. In vitro, EFHC1 loss of function disrupted mitotic spindle organization, impaired M phase progression, induced microtubule bundling and increased apoptosis. EFHC1 impairment in the rat developing neocortex by ex vivo and in utero electroporation caused a marked disruption of radial migration. We found that this effect was a result of cortical progenitors failing to exit the cell cycle and defects in the radial glia scaffold organization and in the locomotion of postmitotic neurons. Therefore, we propose that EFHC1 is a regulator of cell division and neuronal migration during cortical development and that disruption of its functions leads to JME [less ▲]

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See detailDeletion of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1 gene accentuates D-amphetamine-induced psychomotor activation but neither the subsequent development of sensitization nor the expression of conditioned activity in mice
Tyhon, Amélie ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Grisar, Thierry ULg et al

in Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior (2008), 88

The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor (Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1) present an elevated vulnerability towards the neurobehavioural effects of D ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor (Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1) present an elevated vulnerability towards the neurobehavioural effects of D-amphetamine, presumably due to previously established up-regulations of dopamine D1 receptors in these mice. We examined the psychomotor effects of five once-daily injections of 1.5 and 3 mg/kg D-amphetamine (i.p.) or ten once-daily injections of 2.25 mg/kg D-amphetamine in knockout (KO) mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor. The first injection of Damphetamine induced a greater psychomotor response amongst the KO mice at 2.25 and 3.0 mg/kg. On all subsequent D-amphetamine injections, KO mice still showed greater levels of psychomotor activity than the WT mice, but with no between-genotype difference in the rate of development of sensitization (similar slopes of the curves). Furthermore, 24 h after the last injection of 2.25 mg/kg D-amphetamine both genotypes exhibited a significant post-sensitization conditioned activity. Thus, MCHR1 receptors are likely not deeply involved in the mechanisms of induction of sensitization and related conditioned activity induced by D-amphetamine, albeit our results confirm a contribution of these receptors to the mechanisms of the acute effects of that drug, possibly via an inhibitory action on the dopaminergic mesolimbic system. Our results do not support the hypothesis of a functional contribution of MCHR1 receptors to the addictive effects of D-amphetamine [less ▲]

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See detailAmphetamine- and cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and concomitant psychomotor sensitization in mice with genetically inactivated melanin-concentrating hormone MCH(1) receptor.
Tyhon, Amélie ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2008), 599(1-3), 72-80

The melanin-concentrating hormone MCH(1) receptor has been proposed to exert an inhibitory control on monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) activity within the mesolimbic system, which underpins drug ... [more ▼]

The melanin-concentrating hormone MCH(1) receptor has been proposed to exert an inhibitory control on monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) activity within the mesolimbic system, which underpins drug seeking and reward. That hypothesis predicts that an inactivation of these receptors should enhance the sensitivity to drug rewarding effects. To test that prediction, we examined the propensity of mice lacking the melanin-concentrating receptor (MCH(1) KO) and their intact counterparts (WT) to form cocaine- and amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference. The conditioned rewarding effects induced by 0.375, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 mg/kg amphetamine were assessed in two sub-experiments and those induced by 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg cocaine in two other sub-experiments. All mice were tested under saline for place preference 24 h following four every-other-day conditioning trials and an initial pre-conditioning session under saline. Most of the cocaine and amphetamine doses induced place preference, but without any genotype difference being revealed. Also, none of the cocaine doses induced psychomotor sensitization during conditioning, whereas amphetamine generated clear-cut dose-dependent sensitization in both genotypes. Albeit MCH(1) KO mice exhibited higher levels of psychomotor activation, the rates of sensitization were comparable across genotypes at 1.5 and 3 mg/kg amphetamine. Moreover, 0.375 and especially 0.75 mg/kg amphetamine produced a slight but yet significant sensitization in MCH(1) KO but not in their WT counterparts. Despite such an effect, the results cannot be considered as unambiguously supportive of the tested prediction. [less ▲]

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See detailAdenylate Kinase-Independent Thiamine Triphosphate Accumulation under Severe Energy Stress in Escherichia Coli
Gigliobianco, Tiziana ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Makarchikov, Alexander F et al

in BMC Microbiology (2008), 8

BACKGROUND: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) exists in most organisms and might play a role in cellular stress responses. In E. coli, ThTP is accumulated in response to amino acid starvation but the mechanism ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) exists in most organisms and might play a role in cellular stress responses. In E. coli, ThTP is accumulated in response to amino acid starvation but the mechanism of its synthesis is still a matter of controversy. It has been suggested that ThTP is synthesized by an ATP-dependent specific thiamine diphosphate kinase. However, it is also known that vertebrate adenylate kinase 1 catalyzes ThTP synthesis at a very low rate and it has been postulated that this enzyme is responsible for ThTP synthesis in vivo. RESULTS: Here we show that bacterial, as vertebrate adenylate kinases are able to catalyze ThTP synthesis, but at a rate more than 106-fold lower than ATP synthesis. This activity is too low to explain the high rate of ThTP accumulation observed in E. coli during amino acid starvation. Moreover, bacteria from the heat-sensitive CV2 strain accumulate high amounts of ThTP (>50% of total thiamine) at 37 degrees C despite complete inactivation of adenylate kinase and a subsequent drop in cellular ATP. CONCLUSION: These results clearly demonstrate that adenylate kinase is not responsible for ThTP synthesis in vivo. Furthermore, they show that E. coli accumulate large amounts of ThTP under severe energy stress when ATP levels are very low, an observation not in favor of an ATP-dependent mechanisms for ThTP synthesis. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep architecture of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1-knockout mice
Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Salvert, D.; Goutagny, R. et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2008), 27(7), 1793-800

Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating ... [more ▼]

Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons of the rat hypothalamus are selectively activated during a PS rebound. In addition, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH increases total sleep duration, suggesting a new role for MCH in sleep regulation. To determine whether activation of the MCH system promotes sleep, we studied spontaneous sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice with deletion of the MCH-receptor 1 gene (MCH-R1– ⁄ – vs. MCH-R1+ ⁄ +) and their behavioural response to modafinil, a powerful antinarcoleptic drug. Here, we show that the lack of functional MCH-R1 results in a hypersomniac-like phenotype, both in basal conditions and after total sleep deprivation, compared to wild-type mice. Further, we found that modafinil was less potent at inducing wakefulness in MCH-R1– ⁄ – than in MCH-R1+ ⁄ + mice. We report for the first time that animals with genetically inactivated MCH signaling exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. This study also suggests that the MCH system may modulate central pathways involved in the wake-promoting effect of modafinil [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of ppMCH derived peptides on PBMC proliferation and cytokine expression
Coumans, Bernard ULg; Grisar, Thierry ULg; Nahon, J. L. et al

in Regulatory Peptides (2007), 143(1-3), 104-108

The mRNA encoding prepro-Melanin concentrating hormone (ppMCH) is mainly expressed in the central nervous system but has also been detected at lower amount in many peripheral tissues including spleen and ... [more ▼]

The mRNA encoding prepro-Melanin concentrating hormone (ppMCH) is mainly expressed in the central nervous system but has also been detected at lower amount in many peripheral tissues including spleen and thymus. At the peptide level however, several forms of the precursor can be detected in these tissues and are sometimes expressed at similar levels compared to brain. In the present work, we have studied the in vitro action of a wide range of concentration (1 nM to 1 microM) of the different peptides encoded by ppMCH i.e. neuropeptide glycine-glutamic acid (NGE), neuropeptide glutamic acid-isoleucine (NEI), Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and the dipeptide NEI-MCH on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation and cytokine production following anti-CD3 stimulation. Among them only MCH decreased PBMC proliferation with a maximal effect of 35% at 100 nM. Moreover as demonstrated by using ELISA, MCH significantly decreases IL-2 production by 25% but not IL-4, INF-gamma or TNF-alpha expression. Interestingly, exogenous IL-2 decreases significantly MCH-mediated inhibition, suggesting that it is an important downstream mediator of MCH action. Finally, we showed that after 7 to 9 days of incubation, MCH also inhibits proliferation of non-stimulated PBMC. Altogether, these data demonstrate that fully mature MCH modulates proliferation of anti-CD3 stimulated PBMC partially through regulation of IL-2 production. [less ▲]

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See detailAlcohol drinking in MCH receptor-1-deficient mice
Duncan, E. A.; Sorrell, J. E.; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg et al

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2007), 31(8), 1325-1337

Background: Recently, we demonstrated that exogenous melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) increases alcohol drinking in rats when administered into the brain. However, because the physiological relevance ... [more ▼]

Background: Recently, we demonstrated that exogenous melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) increases alcohol drinking in rats when administered into the brain. However, because the physiological relevance of this finding is unclear, we tested the hypothesis that endogenous MCH signaling enhances alcohol consumption. Methods: Alcohol intake was assessed in male and female wildtype (WT), heterozygous (HET), and homozygous MCH receptor-1-deficient (KO) mice. Mice were given 24-hour access to a series of alcohol-containing solutions. Following this, the mice were given limited (1-hour) access to 10% alcohol. Finally, mice were allowed 24-hour access to sucrose/quinine as a caloric control and a means to assess taste preference. A naive cohort of male WT and KO mice was tested for alcohol clearance following intraperitoneal administration of 3 g/kg alcohol. Another naive cohort of female mice was utilized to confirm that intracerebroventricular administration of MCH (5 mu g) would augment alcohol drinking in mice. Results: Exogenous MCH enhanced 10% alcohol consumption in mice (saline=0.45 +/- 0.08 g/kg, 5 mu g MCH=0.94 +/- 0.20 g/kg). Male KO mice consumed more 10% alcohol (11.50 +/- 1.31 g/kg) than WT (6.26 +/- 1.23 g/kg) and HET mice (6.49 +/- 1.23 g/kg) during ad libitum access. However, alcohol intake was similar among genotypes during 1 hour daily access. Male KO mice tended to consume less 17.75% sucrose+1.3 mM quinine than controls (WT=10.5 +/- 3.6, HET=7.5 +/- 1.7, KO=4.4 +/- 0.9 g/kg). Alcohol metabolism was similar between WT and KO mice. Conclusions: The finding that male KO consume more alcohol than WT and HET mice, are reminiscent of the counterintuitive reports that KO mice are hyperphagic and yet eat more when administered exogenous MCH. Changes in taste preference or alcohol metabolism do not appear to be important for the increased alcohol drinking in KO mice. [less ▲]

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See detailMice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1 exhibit an atypical psychomotor susceptibility to cocaine and no conditioned cocaine response
Tyhon, Alain ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2006), 173(1), 94-103

The present study aimed at characterizing the acute and intermittent psychomotor responsiveness to cocaine in mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor, which is thought to modulate the mesocorticolimbic sytem ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed at characterizing the acute and intermittent psychomotor responsiveness to cocaine in mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor, which is thought to modulate the mesocorticolimbic sytem functioning [Smith DG, Tzavara ET, Shaw J, Luecke S, Wade M, Davis R, et al. Mesolimbic dopamine super-sensitivity in melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor deficient mice. J Neurosci 2005;25:914-22]. On a first free-drug session, MCHR1-deficient mice exhibited significantly higher levels of locomotor activity elicited by the novelty of the test chambers than their wild-type counterparts. On the following day session, a first injection of 6 or 12mg/kg cocaine induced comparable dose-related psychomotor activations in both genotypes, without significant difference in the relative increase in locomotion. Over the following eight once-daily test sessions, the slight psychomotor increase induced by 6mg/kg was equivalent in both genotypes and constant over the sessions. At 12mg/kg, cocaine induced a clear-cut incremental responsiveness to cocaine in both genotypes on the three first sessions; on the following sessions, only the wild-types displayed an incremental responsiveness until the last session, a sensitized effect that was confirmed for the wild-types but not for the knockouts on a subsequent sensitization test (cocaine challenge). Finally, the knockouts did not exhibit any sign of cocaine-conditioning (saline challenge), contrarily to the wild-types. It is speculated that MCHR1 may contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of conditioned cocaine-induced psychomotor effects, possibly to those underpinning sensitization, and to a lesser extent to those sub-serving acute pharmacological cocaine action. [less ▲]

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See detailEFHC1, a protein mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, associates with the mitotic spindle through its N-terminus
de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Experimental Cell Research (2006), 312(15), 2872-2879

A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we ... [more ▼]

A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we expressed EGFP-tagged protein in various cell lines. In interphase cells, the fusion protein was present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus with specific accumulation at the centrosome. During mitosis EGFP-EFHC1 colocalized with the mitotic spindle, especially at spindle poles and with the midbody during cytokinesis. Using a specific antibody, we demonstrated the same distribution of the endogenous protein. Deletion analyses revealed that the N-terminal region of EFHC1 is crucial for the association with the mitotic spindle and the midbody. Our results suggest that EFHC1 could play an important role during cell division. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSome genetic and biochemical aspects of myoclonus
Grisar, Thierry ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Chanas, G. et al

in Neurophysiologie Clinique = Clinical Neurophysiology (2006), 36(5-6, Sep-Dec), 271-279

Can a gene defect be responsible for the occurrence in an individual, at a particular age, of such a muscle twitch followed by relaxation called: "myoclonus" and defined as sudden, brief, shock-like ... [more ▼]

Can a gene defect be responsible for the occurrence in an individual, at a particular age, of such a muscle twitch followed by relaxation called: "myoclonus" and defined as sudden, brief, shock-like movements? Genetic defects could indeed determine a subsequent cascade of molecular events (caused by abnormal encoded proteins) that would produce new aberrant cellular relationships in a particular area of the CNS leading to re-builded "myoclonogenic" neuronal networks. This can be illustrated reviewing some inherited neurological entities that are characterized by a predominant myoclonic picture and among which a clear gene defect has been identified. In the second part of this chapter, we will also propose a new point of view on how some structural genes could, under certain conditions, when altered, produced idiopathic generalized epilepsy with myoclonic jerks, taking juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and the myoclonin (EFHC-1) gene as examples. (c) 2007 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDisrupting the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in mice leads to cognitive and NMDA response deficit
Grisar, Thierry ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Thomas, Elizabeth et al

in Journal of the Neurological Sciences (2005, November 15), 238(Suppl. 1), 288

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See detailPig tissues express a catalytically inefficient 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase: Insight in the catalytic mechanisms of this enzyme
Szyniarowski, Piotr; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Czerniecki, Jan ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects (2005), 1725(1), 93-102

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms and may be an intracellular signal molecule produced in response to stress. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms and may be an intracellular signal molecule produced in response to stress. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. The enzyme was active in all mammalian species studied except pig, although the corresponding mRNA was present. In order to determine whether the very low ThTPase activity in pig tissues is due to the absence of the protein or to a lack of catalytic efficiency, we expressed human and pig ThTPase in E. coli as GST fusion proteins. The purified recombinant pig GST-ThTPase was found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude less active than human GST-ThTPase. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that, in particular, the change of Glu85 to lysine is responsible for decreased solubility and catalytic activity of the pig enzyme. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a distribution of the protein in pig brain very similar to the one reported in rodent brain. Thus, our results suggest that a 25-kDa protein homologous to hThTPase but practically devoid of enzyme activity is expressed in pig tissues. This raises the possibility that this protein may play a physiological role other than ThTP hydrolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailDisrupting the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in mice leads to cognitive deficits and alterations of NMDA receptor function.
Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Thomas, Elizabeth; Foidart, Agnès ULg et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2005), 21(10), 2837-44

In order to investigate the physiological properties of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) we have generated and used mice from which the MCH receptor 1 gene was deleted (MCHR1(Neo/Neo) mice ... [more ▼]

In order to investigate the physiological properties of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) we have generated and used mice from which the MCH receptor 1 gene was deleted (MCHR1(Neo/Neo) mice). Complementary experimental approaches were used to investigate alterations in the learning and memory processes of our transgenic model. The ability of the knockout strain to carry out the inhibitory passive avoidance test was found to be considerably impaired although no significant differences were observed in anxiety levels. This impaired cognitive property prompted us to explore modifications in N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) responses in the hippocampus. Intracellular recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from the MCHR1(Neo/Neo) mice revealed significantly decreased NMDA responses. Finally, using in situ hybridization we found a 15% reduction in NMDAR1 subunit in the CA1 region. These results show for the first time a possible role for MCH in the control of the function of the NMDA receptor. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoter characterization of the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Gene Structure and Expression (2004), 1678(1), 1-6

The gene encoding the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 was isolated and its structural organization and flanking regions were characterized. The 3' flanking region is marked by the presence ... [more ▼]

The gene encoding the mouse melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 was isolated and its structural organization and flanking regions were characterized. The 3' flanking region is marked by the presence of two polyadenylation signals but used with different frequencies. RNase protection and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) identified multiple transcription initiation sites between -150 and -203 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. Functional analysis of deletion mutants reveals a cell independent transcriptional activity localized between nucleotide -305 and -589. The proximal 1.5 kb region does not possess consensus TATA or CAAT boxes but has several consensus sequences for regulatory elements including USF, GATA, AP1, AP4, MyoD, GKLF and Ikaros that could explain the broad expression of the receptor. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal localization of the 25-kDa specific thiamine triphosphatase in rodent brain
Czerniecki, Jan ULg; Chanas, Grazyna; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2004), 125(4), 833-840

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of certain proteins; this may be part of a new signal transduction pathway. We have recently characterized a highly specific 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) that is expressed in most mammalian tissues. The role of this enzyme may be the control of intracellular concentrations of ThTP. As the latter has been considered to be a neuroactive form of thiamine, we have studied the distribution of ThTPase mRNA and protein in rodent brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. With both methods, we found the strongest staining in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, as well as cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells. Some interneurons were also labeled and many ThTPase mRNA-positive and immunoreactive cells were distributed throughout cerebral cortical gray matter and the thalamus. White matter was not significantly labeled. ThTPase immunoreactivity seems to be located mainly in the cytoplasm of neuronal perikarya. Immunocytochemical data using dissociated cultured cells from hippocampal and cerebellum showed that the staining was more intense in neurons than in astrocytes. The protein was rather uniformly located in the perikarya and dendrites, suggesting that ThTP and ThTPase may play a general role in neuronal metabolism rather than a specific role in excitability. There was no apparent correlation between ThTPase expression and selective vulnerability of certain brain regions to thiamine deficiency. (C) 2004 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase in rodent tissues using quantitative PCR and characterization of its mRNA
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Dubail, Johanne ULg et al

in International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (2004), 36(10), 2032-2041

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms, but its biological role remains unclear. In mammalian tissues, cellular ThTP concentrations remain low, probably because of hydrolysis by a ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms, but its biological role remains unclear. In mammalian tissues, cellular ThTP concentrations remain low, probably because of hydrolysis by a specific 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase). The aim of the present study was to use quantitative PCR, for comparing the 25 kDa ThTPase mRNA expression in various mouse tissues with its enzyme activities. ThTPase mRNA was expressed at only a few copies per cell. The highest amount of mRNA was found in testis, followed by lung and muscle, while the highest enzyme activities were found in liver and kidney. The poor correlation between mRNA levels and enzyme activities might result either from tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA processing and/or translation or from the regulation of enzyme activities by post-translational mechanisms. Purified recombinant human ThTPase was phosphorylated by casein kinase 11, but this phosphorylation did not modify the enzyme activity. However, the characterization of the 3'-untranslated mRNA region revealed a unique, highly conserved, 200-nucleotide sequence that might be involved in translational control. In situ hybridization studies in testis suggest a predominant localization of ThTPase mRNA in poorly differentiated spermatogenic cells. This is the first study demonstrating a cell-specific 25 kDa ThTPase mRNA expression, suggesting that this enzyme might be related to the degree of differentiation or the metabolic state of the cell. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman recombinant thiamine triphosphatase: purification, secondary structure and catalytic properties
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Makarchikov, Alexander F; Wins, Pierre et al

in International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (2004), 36(7), 1348-1364

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most living organisms and it may act as a phosphate donor for protein phosphorylation. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25 ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most living organisms and it may act as a phosphate donor for protein phosphorylation. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase; EC 3.6.1.28). As the enzyme has a high catalytic efficiency and no sequence homology with known phosphohydrolases, it was worth investigating its structure and catalytic properties. For this purpose, we expressed the untagged recombinant human ThTPase (hThTPase) in E. coli, produced the protein on a large scale and purified it to homogeneity. Its kinetic properties were similar to those of the genuine human enzyme, indicating that the recombinant hThTPase is completely functional. Mg2+ ions were required for activity and Ca2+ inhibited the enzyme by competition with Mg2+. With ATP as substrate, the catalytic efficiency was 10(-4)-fold lower than with ThTP, confirming the nearly absolute specificity of the 25 kDa ThTPase for ThTP. The activity was maximum at pH 8.5 and very low at pH 6.0. Zn2+ ions were inhibitory at micromolar concentrations at pH 8.0 but activated at pH 6.0. Kinetic analysis suggests an activator site for Mg2+ and a separate regulatory site for Zn2+. The effects of group-specific reagents such as Woodward's reagent K and diethylpyrocarbonate suggest that at least one carboxyl group in the active site is essential for catalysis, while a positively charged amino group may be involved in substrate binding. The secondary structure of the enzyme, as determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, was predominantly beta-sheet and alpha-helix. [less ▲]

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See detailThiamine triphosphate and thiamine triphosphatase activities: from bacteria to mammals
Makarchikov, Alexander F; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Gulyai, I. E. et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2003), 60(7), 1477-1488

In most organisms, the main form of thiamine is the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate. Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is also found in low amounts in most vertebrate tissues and can phosphorylate certain ... [more ▼]

In most organisms, the main form of thiamine is the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate. Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is also found in low amounts in most vertebrate tissues and can phosphorylate certain proteins. Here we show that ThTP exists not only in vertebrates but is present in bacteria, fungi, plants and invertebrates. Unexpectedly, we found that in Escherichia coli as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana, ThTP was synthesized only under particular circumstances such as hypoxia (E. coli) or withering (A. thaliana). In mammalian tissues, ThTP concentrations are regulated by a specific thiamine triphosphatase that we have recently characterized. This enzyme was found only in mammals. In other organisms, ThTP can be hydrolyzed by unspecific phosphohydrolases. The occurrence of ThTP from prokaryotes to mammals suggests that it may have a basic role in cell metabolism or cell signaling. A decreased content may contribute to the symptoms observed during thiamine deficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailA general method for the chemical synthesis of gamma-P-32-labeled or unlabeled nucleoside 5 '-triphosphates and thiamine triphosphate
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Nghiem, Hoang O; Wins, Pierre et al

in Analytical Biochemistry (2003), 322(2), 190-197

Several methods for the chemical synthesis of gamma-P-32-labeled and unlabeled nucleoside 5'-triphosphates and thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) have been described. They often proved unsatisfactory because of ... [more ▼]

Several methods for the chemical synthesis of gamma-P-32-labeled and unlabeled nucleoside 5'-triphosphates and thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) have been described. They often proved unsatisfactory because of low yield, requirement for anhydrous solvents, procedures involving several steps or insufficient specific radioactivity of the labeled triphosphate. In the method described here, all these drawbacks are avoided. The synthesis of [gamma-P-32]TbTP was carried out in one step, using 1,3-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as condensing agent for thiamine diphosphate and phosphoric acid in a dimethyl sulfoxide/pyridine solvent mixture. Anhydrous solvents were not required and the yield reached 90%. After purification, [gamma-P-32]ThTP had a specific radioactivity of 11 Ci/mmol and was suitable for protein phosphorylation. The method can also be used for the synthesis Of [gamma-P-32]ATP of the desired specific radioactivity. It can easily be applied to the synthesis of unlabeled ThTP or ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates. In the latter case, inexpensive 5'-monophosphate precursors can be used as reactants in a 20-fold excess of phosphoric acid. Deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates were obtained in 6 h with a yield of at least 70%. After purification, the nucleotides were found to be suitable substrates for Taq polymerase during polymerase chain reaction cycling. Our method can easily be scaled up for industrial synthesis of a variety of labeled and unlabeled triphosphoric derivatives from their mono- or diphosphate precursors. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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