References of "LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio"
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See detailL'image du mois: un serpent en liberté.
ANCION, Arnaud ULg; MARCHETTA, Stella ULg; BERTHE, Christian ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011)

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See detail[Mitral regurgitation in patients with systolic heart failure: more than a bystander].
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Dulgheru, R.

in Revista Espanola de Cardiologia (2011)

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See detailMathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Moorhead, Katherine; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2011), 10(1), 86

Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models ... [more ▼]

Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS) model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate “open on pressure, close on flow” law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV) loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves. [less ▲]

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See detailLe cas clinique du mois. Péricardite purulente chez un patient atteint de sarcoïdose pulmonaire
NYSSEN, Astrid ULg; MELON, Pierre ULg; GARWEG, Christophe ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011)

We report the case of a patient, suffering from pulmonary sarcoidosis, who developed a purulent pericarditis complicated with a cardiac tamponade. The widespread use of antibiotics has progressively ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a patient, suffering from pulmonary sarcoidosis, who developed a purulent pericarditis complicated with a cardiac tamponade. The widespread use of antibiotics has progressively reduced the number of purulent pericarditis. However, it remains a serious disease that has to be rapidly diagnosed to be treated timely. We will review the required tests for the diagnosis and the treatment of this pathology that leads to death otherwise. The link with pulmonary sardoidosis is uncertain. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft ventricular dyssynchrony: a dynamic condition.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Moonen, Marie ULg

in Heart Failure Reviews (2011)

Left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD) is common in heart failure patients with LV systolic dysfunction. Contrary to what it could be expected, LVD is not a stable phenomenon. Various conditions (inducible ... [more ▼]

Left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD) is common in heart failure patients with LV systolic dysfunction. Contrary to what it could be expected, LVD is not a stable phenomenon. Various conditions (inducible ischemia, exercise, drug administration) may significantly alter the presence and the magnitude of LVD, which could per se modulate response to treatment for heart failure. LVD can be evaluated using validated Doppler-echocardiographic techniques as tissue Doppler imaging. Exercise and dobutamine stress echocardiography can be used tests to unmask LVD. Changes in LV synchronicity during stress test occur independently of inducible ischemia and irrespective of QRS width. The degree of LVD varies substantially from patient to patient. The dynamic increase in LVD represents a strong contributor: (1) to exercise-induced changes in mitral regurgitation, (2) to limitation of stroke volume adaptation during exercise, and (3) to exertional dyspnea. Whether dynamic LVD might independently affect the outcome has not yet been demonstrated. In the setting of CRT, the assessment of dynamic LVD might help patient selection, predict the magnitude of response, and optimize pacing delivery during exercise. Further longitudinal studies are required to confirm the value of assessing dynamic LVD. [less ▲]

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See detailComment j'explore... une insuffisance cardiaque chronique
ANCION, Arnaud ULg; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011)

Heart failure is defined by precise criteria associating clinical signs and cardiac abnormalities. The exploration for signs and symptoms must be associated with the systematic realization of an ... [more ▼]

Heart failure is defined by precise criteria associating clinical signs and cardiac abnormalities. The exploration for signs and symptoms must be associated with the systematic realization of an electrocardiogram, a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram to rapidly obtain the diagnosis and direct the patient to an adapted complementary clarification. Other additional tests are available (catheterization, nuclear cardiology imaging,...). The purpose is to confirm the diagnosis, to determine the aetiology and to identify factors of poor prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailA statement on ethics from the HEART Group.
Ector, H.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Roberts, W. et al

in Anadolu Kardiyoloji Dergisi = Anatolian Journal of Cardiology (2011)

Over the past several years, the editors of leading international cardiovascular journals have met to form the HEART group and to discuss areas of growing, common interest. Recently, the HEART group has ... [more ▼]

Over the past several years, the editors of leading international cardiovascular journals have met to form the HEART group and to discuss areas of growing, common interest. Recently, the HEART group has developed a document that addresses general ethical principles in the conduct of the scientific process with which all of the editors concur. Published essentially simultaneously in all of the participating journals, including this journal, this document presents the ethical tenets accepted by all of the undersigned editors that will (continue to) guide their decisions in the editorial process. These are the general principles on which the HEART Group is based and by which we, as a group, abide; however, please note that individual journal members and their respective societies may have their own rules and regulations that supersede the guidelines of the HEART Group. [less ▲]

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See detailMinimal cardiovascular system model including a physiological description of progressive mitral valve orifice dynamics for studying valve dysfunction
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Moorhead, Katerine; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in XXIIIrd congress of the International Society of Biomechanics, July 3-7, 2011 (2011, July)

This research presents a new closed-loop cardiovascular system model including a description of the progressive opening and closing dynamic of the mitral valve. Furthermore, this model includes a ... [more ▼]

This research presents a new closed-loop cardiovascular system model including a description of the progressive opening and closing dynamic of the mitral valve. Furthermore, this model includes a mathematical description of the left atrium. This new CVS model enables the study of valve dysfunction in the appropriate clinical context of the overall cardiac and circulatory hemodynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailValvuloarterial impedance in aortic stenosis: look at the load, but do not forget the flow.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(5), 354-357

This editorial refers to ‘Valvuloarterial impedance does <br />not improve risk stratification in low-ejection fraction, <br />low-gradient aortic stenosis: results from a multicentre <br />study’ by F ... [more ▼]

This editorial refers to ‘Valvuloarterial impedance does <br />not improve risk stratification in low-ejection fraction, <br />low-gradient aortic stenosis: results from a multicentre <br />study’ by F. Levy et al., on page 358. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft atrial function and remodelling in aortic stenosis.
O'Connor, K.; Magne, Julien ULg; Rosca, M. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(4), 299-305

AIMS: The present study sought to determine the relationship between left atrial (LA) volume (structural changes) and LA function as assessed by strain rate imaging in patients with aortic stenosis (AS ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The present study sought to determine the relationship between left atrial (LA) volume (structural changes) and LA function as assessed by strain rate imaging in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). <br />METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of a total of 64 consecutive patients with severe AS (<1 cm²) and 20 healthy control subjects. The phasic LA volumes and function (tissue Doppler-derived strain) were assessed in all patients. As compared with healthy controls, all strain-derived parameters of LA function were reduced in patients with AS. Conversely, only indexed LA passive volume (increased) (7.6 ± 3.8 vs. 10.5 ± 5.1 ml/m², P= 0.02) and LA active fraction (decreased) (43 ± 6.7 vs. 31 ± 13.3%, P< 0.001) (volume-based parameters) were significantly different between AS and controls. In AS, LA volume-derived function parameters were poorly correlated with LA strain parameters. In fact, by multivariable analysis, no LA phasic strain parameters emerged as independently associated with LA phasic volume parameters. <br />CONCLUSIONS: In AS, changes in LA function did not parallel changes in LA size. Furthermore, the increase in LA volume does not necessarily reflect the presence of intrinsic LA dysfunction [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of aortic stenosis on longitudinal myocardial deformation during exercise.
Donal, E.; Thebault, C.; O'Connor, K. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial ... [more ▼]

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial impairment. AIMS: We sought to determine the impact of aortic stenosis (AS) on left ventricular (LV) longitudinal function at exercise in a series of asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved LV ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Long-axis function was assessed at rest and at exercise by using 2D speckle tracking of myocardial deformation in 207 AS patients (aortic valve area 0.87 ± 0.19 cm²) and 43 aged-matched control subjects. When compared with control subjects, patients with AS have reduced longitudinal myocardial function at rest (-20.2 ± 2.7 vs. -15.4 ± 4.0%) and at peak exercise (-25.0 ± 3.7 vs. -16.5 ± 4.9%) (P < 0.0001 for both). Exercise changes in global longitudinal strain were correlated with changes in LV ejection in controls but not in patients with AS. Changes in LV global longitudinal strain during test were lower in AS patients with an abnormal response to exercise (-0.5 ± 2.7 vs. -1.5 ± 2.8%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a lower global longitudinal strain at rest (P = 0.04), a higher increase in mean trans-valvular pressure gradient (P < 0.001) at exercise, and smaller exercise-induced changes in global longitudinal strain (P < 0.001) were associated with an abnormal exercise test. CONCLUSION: In AS, subnormal LV function can be reliably identified by 2D strain imaging at rest and during a sub-maximal exercise. That sensitive measure of LV systolic function is depressed in AS and even more in patients having the most severe AS. [less ▲]

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See detailLa Vignette diagnostique de l'étudiant: Critères électrocardiographiques d’une tachycardie ventriculaire
GARWEG, Christophe ULg; BOLOGNE, Jean-Christophe ULg; MELON, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011)

Recording of a regular wide QRS tachycardia is often source of panic and anxiety for the young clinician who has to make the differential diagnosis between ventricular tachycardia and supraventricular ... [more ▼]

Recording of a regular wide QRS tachycardia is often source of panic and anxiety for the young clinician who has to make the differential diagnosis between ventricular tachycardia and supraventricular tachycardia with aberration associated with fundamentally different vital prognosis. Most of the time, a rigorous approach and a systematic analysis of the electrocardiogram associated with clinical examination allow to obtain the correct diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe use of pocket-size imaging devices: a position statement of the European Association of Echocardiography.
Sicari, R.; Galderisi, M.; Voigt, J. U. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

Pocket-size imaging devices are a completely new type of echo machines which have recently reached the market. They are very cheap, smartphone-size hand-held echo machines with limited technical ... [more ▼]

Pocket-size imaging devices are a completely new type of echo machines which have recently reached the market. They are very cheap, smartphone-size hand-held echo machines with limited technical capabilities. The aim of this European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) position paper is to provide recommendations on the use of pocket-size imaging devices in the clinical arena by profiling the educational needs of potential users other than cardiologists experts in echo. EAE recommendations about pocket-size imaging devices can be summarized in: (1) pocket-size imaging devices do not provide a complete diagnostic echocardiographic examination. The range of indications for their use is therefore limited. (2) Imaging assessment with pocket-size imaging devices should be reported as part of the physical examination of the patient. Image data should be stored according to the applicable national rules for technical examinations. (3) With the exception of cardiologists who are certified for transthoracic echocardiography according to national legislation, specific training and certification is recommended for all users. The certification should be limited to the clinical questions that can potentially be answered by pocket-size devices. (4) The patient has to be informed that an examination with the current generation of pocket-size imaging devices does not replace a complete echocardiogram. [less ▲]

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See detailA Statement on Ethics from the HEART Group
Heart Group; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg

in Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology : The Official Journal of the International Society for Holter & Noninvasive Electrocardiology, Inc (2011)

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See detailChanges in mitral regurgitation and left ventricular geometry during exercise affect exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.
Izumo, Masaki; Suzuki, Kengo; Moonen, Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(1), 54-60

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic ... [more ▼]

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry would affect exercise capacity. METHODS AND RESULTS: this study included 30 CHF patients with functional MR who underwent symptom-limited bicycle exercise stress echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing for quantitative assessment of MR (effective regurgitant orifice; ERO), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). LV sphericity index was obtained from real-time three-dimensional echocardiograms. The patients were stratified into exercised-induced MR (EMR; n = 10, an increase in ERO by >/=13 mm(2)) or non-EMR (NEMR; n = 20, an increase in ERO by <13 mm(2)) group. At rest, no differences in LV volume and function, ERO, and PASP were found between the two groups. At peak exercise, PASP and sphericity index were significantly greater (all P < 0.01) in the EMR group. The EMR group revealed lower peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2); P = 0.018) and greater minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (VE/VCO(2) slope; P = 0.042) than the NEMR group. Peak VO(2) negatively correlated with changes in ERO (r = -0.628) and LV sphericity index (r = -0.437); meanwhile, VE/VCO(2) slope was well correlated with these changes (r = 0.414 and 0.364, respectively). A multivariate analysis identified that the change in ERO was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry contributed to the limitation of exercise capacity in patients with CHF. [less ▲]

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See detailManagement of multiple valve disease.
Unger, Philippe; Rosenhek, Raphael; Dedobbeleer, Chantal et al

in Heart (British Cardiac Society) (2011), 97(4), 272-7

Multivalvular heart disease is not an uncommon situation, but the paucity of data for each specific situation does not allow the proposal of a standardised, evidence-based management strategy. This paper ... [more ▼]

Multivalvular heart disease is not an uncommon situation, but the paucity of data for each specific situation does not allow the proposal of a standardised, evidence-based management strategy. This paper aims at reviewing the available evidence on the management of multivalvular disease, taking into account the interactions between different valve lesions, the diagnostic pitfalls and the strategies that should be considered in the presence of multiple valvular disease. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of contrast echocardiography in intensive care and at the emergency room.
Cosyns, Bernard; Roossens, Bram; Hernot, Sophie et al

in Current Cardiology Reviews (2011), 7(3), 157-62

Bedside echocardiography in emergency room (ER) or in intensive care unit (ICU) is an important tool for managing critically ill patients, to obtain a timely accurate diagnosis and to immediately stratify ... [more ▼]

Bedside echocardiography in emergency room (ER) or in intensive care unit (ICU) is an important tool for managing critically ill patients, to obtain a timely accurate diagnosis and to immediately stratify the risk to the patient's life. It may also render invasive monitoring unnecessary. In these patients, contrast echocardiography may improve quality of imaging and also may provide additional information, especially regarding myocardial perfusion in those with suspected coronary artery disease. This article focuses on the principle of contrast echocardiography and the clinical information that can be obtained according to the most frequent presentations in ER and ICU. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical significance of active myeloperoxidase in carotid atherosclerotic plaques
GACH, Olivier ULg; Magne, Julien ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg et al

in International Journal of Cardiology (2011), 152(1), 149-151

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See detailImpact of aortic stiffness on left ventricular function and B-type natriuretic peptide release in severe aortic stenosis.
Rosca, M.; Magne, Julien ULg; Calin, A. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(11), 850-856

Aims: In aortic stenosis (AS), both reduced systemic arterial compliance and increased valvular load have been shown to contribute to impaired left ventricular (LV) function. However, the relationship ... [more ▼]

Aims: In aortic stenosis (AS), both reduced systemic arterial compliance and increased valvular load have been shown to contribute to impaired left ventricular (LV) function. However, the relationship between LV function and aortic stiffness has not yet been investigated. We aimed to assess the relationship between aortic stiffness and LV global longitudinal strain (GLS), LV filling pressures (E/E′) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in AS. <br />Methods and results : A comprehensive echocardiogram was performed in 48 consecutive patients with severe AS (,0.6 cm2/m2) and preserved LV ejection fraction (≥50%). Aortic stiffness index (beta) was calculated based on aortic diameters measured by echocardiography and blood pressure. Systemic arterial compliance (SAC) and valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva) <br />were also determined. Aortic beta index was significantly correlated with Zva (r ¼ 0.30, P ¼ 0.03) and SAC (r ¼ 20.29, P ¼ 0.04). GLS (r ¼ 0.45, P ¼ 0.001), E/E′ (r ¼ 0.48, P ¼ 0.001) and BNP levels (r ¼ 0.45, P ¼ 0.001) were significantly related to aortic beta index. No significant correlation was found between GLS or E/E′ and SAC or Zva. In multivariate regression analysis, aortic beta index remained correlated with GLS, E/E′, and BNP levels. <br />Conclusions : In patients with severe AS and preserved LV ejection fraction, independently of the valvular load, an increase in aortic rigidity, as assessed by aortic beta index, is independently correlated with reduced LV longitudinal function, increased LV filling pressures, and BNP levels. [less ▲]

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