References of "LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio"
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See detailBiological Effects of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance on Human Blood Cells.
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; Delierneux, Céline ULg et al

in Circulation. Cardiovascular imaging (2015), 8(9),

BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used for the diagnosis and management of cardiac diseases. Recent studies have reported immediate post-CMR DNA double-strand breaks in T ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used for the diagnosis and management of cardiac diseases. Recent studies have reported immediate post-CMR DNA double-strand breaks in T lymphocytes. We sought to evaluate CMR-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes, alterations of blood cells, and their temporal persistence. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 20 prospectively enrolled healthy men (31.4+/-7.9 years), blood was drawn before and after (1-2 hours, 2 days, 1 month, and 1 year) unenhanced 1.5T CMR. Blood cell counts, cell death, and activation status of lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets were evaluated. The first 2-hour post-CMR were characterized by a small increase of lymphocyte B and neutrophil counts and a transient drop of total lymphocytes because of a decrease in natural killer cells. Among blood cells, only neutrophils and monocytes displayed slight and transient activation. DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes were quantified through flow cytometric analysis of H2AX phosphorylation (gamma-H2AX). gamma-H2AX intensity in T lymphocytes did not change early after CMR but increased significantly at day 2 </=1 month before returning to baseline levels of 1-year post-CMR. CONCLUSIONS: Unenhanced CMR is associated with minor but significant immediate blood cell alterations or activations figuring inflammatory response, as well as DNA damage in T lymphocytes observed from day 2 until the first month but disappearing at 1-year follow-up. Although further studies are required to definitely state whether CMR can be used safely, our findings already call for caution when it comes to repeat this examination within a month. [less ▲]

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See detail2015 ESC Guidelines for the Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes in Patients Presenting Without Persistent ST-segment Elevation.
Roffi, Marco; Patrono, Carlo; Collet, Jean-Philippe et al

in Revista espanola de cardiologia (English ed.) (2015), 68(12), 1125

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See detailYoung community of EACVI: the transition from EACVI Club 35 to Heart Imagers of Tomorrow: a promising yet challenging step.
Grapsa, Julia; Cameli, Matteo; Granier, Camille et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

The purpose of this review is to summarize the activity and potential of the young community of European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and to highlight the transition from Club 35 to 'Heart ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this review is to summarize the activity and potential of the young community of European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and to highlight the transition from Club 35 to 'Heart Imagers of tomorrow'. [less ▲]

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See detailThe multi-modality cardiac imaging approach to the Athlete's heart: an expert consensus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.
Galderisi, Maurizio; Cardim, Nuno; D'Andrea, Antonello et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

The term 'athlete's heart' refers to a clinical picture characterized by a slow heart rate and enlargement of the heart. A multi-modality imaging approach to the athlete's heart aims to differentiate ... [more ▼]

The term 'athlete's heart' refers to a clinical picture characterized by a slow heart rate and enlargement of the heart. A multi-modality imaging approach to the athlete's heart aims to differentiate physiological changes due to intensive training in the athlete's heart from serious cardiac diseases with similar morphological features. Imaging assessment of the athlete's heart should begin with a thorough echocardiographic examination. Left ventricular (LV) wall thickness by echocardiography can contribute to the distinction between athlete's LV hypertrophy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). LV end-diastolic diameter becomes larger (>55 mm) than the normal limits only in end-stage HCM patients when the LV ejection fraction is <50%. Patients with HCM also show early impairment of LV diastolic function, whereas athletes have normal diastolic function. When echocardiography cannot provide a clear differential diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging should be performed. With CMR, accurate morphological and functional assessment can be made. Tissue characterization by late gadolinium enhancement may show a distinctive, non-ischaemic pattern in HCM and a variety of other myocardial conditions such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy or myocarditis. The work-up of athletes with suspected coronary artery disease should start with an exercise ECG. In athletes with inconclusive exercise ECG results, exercise stress echocardiography should be considered. Nuclear cardiology techniques, coronary cardiac tomography (CCT) and/or CMR may be performed in selected cases. Owing to radiation exposure and the young age of most athletes, the use of CCT and nuclear cardiology techniques should be restricted to athletes with unclear stress echocardiography or CMR. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Is the Role of Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery in High-Risk Patients? A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.
Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Casula, Roberto et al

in The Annals of thoracic surgery (2015)

BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive valve surgery is related to certain better postoperative outcomes. We aimed to assess the role of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery in high-risk patients. METHODS: A ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive valve surgery is related to certain better postoperative outcomes. We aimed to assess the role of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery in high-risk patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review identified eight studies of which seven fulfilled criteria for meta-analysis. Outcomes for a total of 1,254 patients (731 were conventional standard sternotomy and 523 were minimally invasive mitral valve surgery) were submitted to meta-analysis using random effects modeling. Heterogeneity and subgroup analysis with quality scoring were assessed. The primary end point was early mortality. Secondary end points were intraoperative and postoperative outcomes and long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery conferred comparable early mortality to standard sternotomy (p = 0.19); it was also associated with a lower number of units of blood transfused (weighted mean difference, -1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], -3.04 to -0.82; p = 0.0006) and atrial fibrillation rate (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.74; p = 0.0007); however, cardiopulmonary bypass time was longer (weighted mean difference, 20.88; 95% CI, -1.90 to 43.65; p = 0.07). There was no difference in terms of valve repair rate (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.89 to 2.54; p = 0.12), and the incidence of stroke was significantly lower in the high-quality analysis with no heterogeneity (odds ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.82; p = 0.02; chi2, 1.67; I2, 0%; p = 0.43). CONCLUSIONS: Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery is a safe and comparable alternative to standard sternotomy in patients at high risk, with similar early mortality and repair rate and better postoperative outcomes, although a longer cardiopulmonary bypass time is required. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Serial B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Changes for Predicting Outcome in Asymptomatic Patients With Aortic Stenosis.
Henri, Christine; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULg; Magne, Julien et al

in The Canadian journal of cardiology (2015)

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the impact on the outcome of serial B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) changes during follow-up in asymptomatic patients with >/= moderate aortic stenosis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the impact on the outcome of serial B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) changes during follow-up in asymptomatic patients with >/= moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. METHODS: We prospectively screened 69 patients who underwent comprehensive transthoracic echocardiography, BNP level measurement at baseline and after every 6 or 12 months. Annualized BNP changes were calculated as the difference between the last and baseline BNP measurements divided by the duration of follow-up. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of symptoms, aortic valve replacement, or cardiovascular death. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 30 +/- 19 months, 43 patients experienced a cardiac event. These patients were significantly older (73 +/- 9 vs 65 +/- 16 years; P = 0.010), had more often dyslipidemia (79% vs 42%; P = 0.038), more severe AS (peak velocity: 3.9 +/- 0.6 vs 3.5 +/- 0.6 m/s; P = 0.002), larger indexed left atrial area (10.2 +/- 2.5 vs 8.7 +/- 1.9 cm2/m2; P = 0.006), and a higher increase in annualized BNP (+90 +/- 155 vs +7 +/- 49 pg/mL/y; P = 0.010). Patients with higher annualized BNP changes (> 20 pg/mL/y) had a significantly lower cardiac event-free survival (1 year: 63 +/- 8% vs 97 +/- 3%; 3 years: 31 +/- 8% vs 68 +/- 8%; P < 0.001). Using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, higher annualized BNP changes were significantly associated with increased risk of cardiac events (hazard ratio: 2.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.27-5.86; P = 0.010) after adjustment for age, dyslipidemia, and echocardiographic parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, the use of serial BNP changes may help to anticipate development of class I indication for aortic valve replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailThe year 2014 in the European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging: part II.
Gerber, Bernhard L.; Edvardsen, Thor; Pierard, Luc ULg et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(11), 1180-4

The European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging, created in 2012, has become a reference for publishing multimodality cardiovascular imaging scientific and review papers. The impressive 2014 impact ... [more ▼]

The European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging, created in 2012, has become a reference for publishing multimodality cardiovascular imaging scientific and review papers. The impressive 2014 impact factor of 4.105 confirms the important position of our journal. In this part, we summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year, with specific emphasis on cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases, valvular heart diseases, and heart failure. [less ▲]

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See detailNew biomarkers for primary mitral regurgitation.
Deroyer, Celine; Magne, Julien; MOONEN, Marie ULg et al

in Clinical proteomics (2015), 12

BACKGROUND: Mitral regurgitation is a frequent valvular heart disease affecting around 2.5 % of the population with prevalence directly related to aging. Degeneration of mitral valve is broadly considered ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mitral regurgitation is a frequent valvular heart disease affecting around 2.5 % of the population with prevalence directly related to aging. Degeneration of mitral valve is broadly considered as a passive ongoing pathophysiological process and little is known about its physiological deregulation. The purpose of this study was to highlight new biomarkers of mitral regurgitation in order to decipher the underlying pathological mechanism as well as to allow the diagnosis and the monitoring of the disease. RESULTS: Modulation of various blood proteins expression was examined in patients suffering from different grades of mitral regurgitation (mild, moderate and severe) compared to healthy controls. To this end, several routine clinical assays and the multi analyte profile technology targeting 184 proteins were used. High-density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein-A1, haptoglobin and haptoglobin-alpha2 chain levels significantly decreased proportionally to the degree of mitral regurgitation when compared to controls. High-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein-A1 levels were associated with effective regurgitant orifice area and regurgitant volume. Apolipoprotein-A1 was an independent predictor of severe mitral regurgitation. Moreover, with ordinal logistic regression, apolipoprotein-A1 remained the only independent factor associated with mitral regurgitation. In addition, myxomatous mitral valves were studied by immunocytochemistry. We observed an increase of LC3, the marker of autophagy, in myxomatous mitral valves compared with healthy mitral valves. CONCLUSION: These potential biomarkers of mitral regurgitation highlighted different cellular processes that could be modified in myxomatous degenerescence: reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant properties and autophagy. [less ▲]

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See detail2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension: The Joint Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS): Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC), International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT).
Galie, Nazzareno; Humbert, Marc; Vachiery, Jean-Luc et al

in The European respiratory journal (2015), 46(4), 903-75

Guidelines summarize and evaluate all available evidence on a particular issue at the time of the writing process, with the aim of assisting health professionals in selecting the best management ... [more ▼]

Guidelines summarize and evaluate all available evidence on a particular issue at the time of the writing process, with the aim of assisting health professionals in selecting the best management strategies for an individual patient with a given condition, taking into account the impact on outcome, as well as the risk-benefit ratio of particular diagnostic or therapeutic means. Guidelines and recommendations should help health professionals to make decisions in their daily practice. However, the final decisions concerning an individual patient must be made by the responsible health professional(s) in consultation with the patient and caregiver as appropriate. [less ▲]

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See detailSyndrome coronarien aigu et traitement hypolipemiant. L'etude IMPROVE-IT change-t-elle la donne?
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg; Scheen, Andre ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(9), 450-5

Statins reduce both LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Intensive statin therapy, compared with moderate-dose statin ... [more ▼]

Statins reduce both LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Intensive statin therapy, compared with moderate-dose statin therapy, incrementally lowers LDL-C levels and rates of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Ezetimibe, by diminishing the absorption of cholesterol from the intestine, additionally reduces LDL-C when added to statins. In this article, we discuss the potential benefits of the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe for the long-term management of patients with acute coronary syndrome through an analysis of the IMPROVE-IT results (IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial). This randomised double blind trial included 18,144 patients with a LDL-C of 50 to 100 (with statin) or 125 (without statin) mg/dl and had a median follow-up of 6 years. The objective of the study was to test the efficacy of simvastatin 40 mg versus simvastatin 40 mg and 10 mg ezetimibe. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina and coronary revascularization. The addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin resulted in an incremental lowering of LDL-C (reached value 53.2 versus 69.9 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and a further improvement of the patient prognosis (relative reduction of primary endpoint: -6.4%, p = 0.016). In addition, the combined therapy showed no significant adverse effects, particularly regarding the risk of cancers, which confirms the safety of ezetimibe. In acute coronary syndrome, the prescription of ezetimibe should be considered (class HA, level of evidence B) in patients with a LDL-C a 70 mg/dl despite maximally tolerated dose of statin. [less ▲]

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See detailDETERMINANTS AND PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF LEFT VENTRICULAR CONTRACTILE RESERVE IN ASYMPTOMATIC AORTIC STENOSIS
MAGNE, J.; DONAL, E.; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULg et al

in Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases (2015), 7

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See detail2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension : web addenda
GALIE, Nazzareno; HUMBERT, Marc; VACHIERY, Jean-Luc et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2015)

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See detailEight years of the EACVI's grant programme: existing developments, impact, and steps forward.
Surkova, Elena; Muraru, Denisa; Grapsa, Julia et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(11), 1178-9

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See detailMALADIE CORONAIRE ET INSUFFISANCE CARDIAQUE : APPROCHE GENOTYPIQUE DU TRAITEMENT.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; ANCION, Arnaud ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(5-6), 282-5

Phenotypic approach of the treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure used in prospective randomized trials has contributed to significantly improve patieni prognosis. However, gene ... [more ▼]

Phenotypic approach of the treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure used in prospective randomized trials has contributed to significantly improve patieni prognosis. However, gene polymorphisms have been shown to be able to alter treatment efficacy with anti-platelets, beta-blockers or ACE-inhibitors in these settings. As suggested by several studies, therapeutic approaches based on genotype should contribute to personalize treatments with better efficacy and safety. [less ▲]

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See detailElevated heart rate at 24-36 h after admission and in-hospital mortality in acute in non-arrhythmic heart failure
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; ANCION, Arnaud ULg; Magne, Julien et al

in International journal of cardiology (2015), 182C

BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF) but little is known about its prognostic impact in acute setting. The main aim of the present study ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF) but little is known about its prognostic impact in acute setting. The main aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between resting heart rate obtained 24-36h after admission for acute non-arrhythmic HF and in-hospital mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the association of heart rate with in-hospital mortality in a cohort of 712 patients admitted for acute HF. None of the patients had significant arrhythmias, required invasive ventilation, or presented with acute coronary syndrome or primary valvular disease. Forty patients (5.6%) died during the hospital stay. Those patients were significantly older (78+/-9 vs. 72+/-12years; p=0.0021), had higher heart rate (92+/-22 vs. 78+/-18bpm; p<0.0001), NT pro-BNP (p=0.0005), creatinine (p=0.023), were often diabetics (p=0.026) and had lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p<0.05). There was a significant graded relationship between the increase in mortality rate and tertile of heart rate (p<0.01). With multivariable analysis, age (p=0.037), heart rate (p<0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001), prior ischemic heart disease (p=0.02) and creatinine (p=0.019) emerged as independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. After adjusting for predictors of poor prognosis, patients in the highest heart rate tertile had worst outcomes when compared with those in the lowest heart rate group (p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Higher heart rate 24-36h after admission for acute non-arrhythmic HF is associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Early targeting of elevated heart rate might represent a complementary therapeutic challenge. [less ▲]

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See detailPositron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Device Infective Endocarditis: Ready for Prime Time
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Habib, Gilbert; Oury, Cécile ULg et al

in Circulation (2015)

Over the last decade there has been a remarkable increase in prosthetic heart valve replacement and cardiac implantable electronic device utilization. Although capable of improving the quality and ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade there has been a remarkable increase in prosthetic heart valve replacement and cardiac implantable electronic device utilization. Although capable of improving the quality and quantity of life of patients suffering from severe valvular heart disease or rhythm disorders, they are both subject to potentially life-threatening infection involving the endocardium, referred to as device infective endocarditis (DIE)1,2. The rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) ranges from 1-6% to 15%, being higher in revision surgery1. The infection usually involves the junction between the sewing ring and the annulus, leading to perivalvular abscess, dehiscence, pseudo-aneurysms, and fistulae, or the leaflets of the prosthesis, leading to vegetations, cusp rupture, and perforation. Cardiac device-related infective endocarditis (CDRIE), to be distinguished from local device infection (pocket/generator), is defined as an infection involving the electrode leads, cardiac valve leaflets, or endocardial surface. An incidence of 1.4 per 1000 device-years of definite CDRIE has been reported3. DIE may occur at anytime, being related to surgery only in early cases. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Cardiology Core Syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).
Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H. et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a ... [more ▼]

The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. [less ▲]

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