References of "LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeterminant and Impact on Outcome of Exercise Pulmonary Hypertension in Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis.
Magne, Julien ULg; Donal, E; O'Connor, K et al

Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain natriuretic peptide in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation: determinants and impact on outcome.
Van de Heyning, C; Magne, Julien ULg; Mahjoub, H et al

Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailValvular heart disease: mitral valve disease
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg; O'Connor, K et al

in The EAE textbook of echocardiography (2011)

Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrediction of exercise pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation
Magne, Julien ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; O'Connor, K. et al

in Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography (2011), 24(9), 1004-1012

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment and management of aortic stenosis [Evaluation et traitement de la sténose aortique]
Pirlet, C.; Magne, Julien ULg; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg et al

in Revue Medicale Suisse (2011), 7(306), 1606-1611

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStress testing in valvular heart disease: Clinical benefit of echocardiographic imaging
Roşca, M.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg et al

in Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy (2011), 9(1), 81-92

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailminimal cardiovascular system model including physiological mitral valve opening
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Moorhead, Katherine ULg; chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in 9th Belgian National Day on Biomedical Engineering, Bruxelles, 26th november (2010, November 26)

A minimal cardiovascular system (CVS) model has been previously validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics by means of a Heaviside function to simulate the ... [more ▼]

A minimal cardiovascular system (CVS) model has been previously validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics by means of a Heaviside function to simulate the “open on pressure, close on flow” law. However, this model does not describe the progressive valve opening and therefore, it is not suitable for studying valve dysfunctions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMinimal cardiovascular system model including physiological mitral valve opening
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Moorhead, Katherine ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

Poster (2010, November 26)

This research describes a new closed-loop cardiovascular system (CVS) model including a model of the left atrium and a model describing the progressive aperture of the mitral valve

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMathematical model of the mitral valve and the cardiovascular system, application for studying, monitoring and in the diagnosis of valvular pathologies
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Moorhead, Katherine ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in UKACC international Conference on Control 2010 : Coventry, 7-10 september 2010 (2010, September 07)

A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS) model has been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiological ... [more ▼]

A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS) model has been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiological accurate “open on pressure, close on flow” law. Thus, it does not consider the real time scale of the valve aperture dynamics and thus doesn’t fully capture valve dysfunction particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes a new closed-loop CVS model including a model describing the progressive aperture of the mitral valve and valid over the full cardiac cycle. This new model is solved for a healthy and diseased mitral valve. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRisk stratification in asymptomatic moderate to severe aortic stenosis: the importance of the valvular, arterial and ventricular interplay.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Donal, Erwan; Magne, Julien ULg et al

in Heart (2010), 96(17), 1364-71

OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate prognostic markers of clinical outcome in asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis (AS). DESIGN: Prospective follow-up of asymptomatic patients with ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate prognostic markers of clinical outcome in asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis (AS). DESIGN: Prospective follow-up of asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AS. The patients underwent clinical and Doppler echocardiographic evaluation. SETTING: Department of Cardiology. PATIENTS: 163 patients with moderate to severe AS (aortic valve area < or =0.6 cm(2)/m(2)). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk stratification. Predefined endpoints for assessing the outcome were the occurrence during follow-up of symptoms, aortic valve replacement or death. RESULTS: During follow-up (mean, 20 (19) months), 11 patients developed symptoms but were not operated on, 57 required aortic valve replacement and six patients died. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, four parameters that were associated with the outcome were identified: peak aortic jet velocity, left ventricular systolic (LV) longitudinal deformation, valvulo-arterial impedance and indexed left atrial area. Using receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis, a peak aortic jet velocity > or =4.4 m/s, a LV longitudinal myocardial deformation < or =15.9%, a valvular-arterial impedance > or =4.9 mm Hg/ml per m(2) and an indexed left atrial area > or =12.2 cm(2)/m(2) were identified as the best cut-off values to be associated with events. CONCLUSIONS: In asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AS, measurements that integrate the ventricular, vascular and valvular components of the disease improve risk stratification. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEtude échocardiographique longitudinale chez des patients atteints de prolactinome et traités par cabergoline
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Latta, K.; O'Connor, Kim ULg et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (2010, September), 71(5), 399

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEtude échocardiographique longitudinale chez des patients atteints de prolactinome et traités par Cabergoline
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Latta, K.; O'Connor, K. et al

in 27ème Congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie - Deauville, 29 septembre - 2 octobre 2010 (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of mitral regurgitation and myocardial viability on left ventricular reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.
Senechal, Mario; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg et al

in American Journal of Cardiology (2010), 106(1), 31-7

This study investigated the impact of ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) severity and viability on left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the impact of ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) severity and viability on left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Severe MR and ischemic cardiomyopathy have been associated with lack of LV reverse remodeling after CRT. Fifty-seven consecutive patients with ischemic MR, LV ejection fraction < or =35%, QRS duration > or =120 ms, and intraventricular dyssynchrony > or =50 ms were prospectively included. Stress echocardiography was performed before CRT implantation. Viability in the region of the LV pacing lead was defined as the presence of viability in 2 contiguous segments. Response to CRT at 6 months was defined by evidence of > or =15% LV decrease in end-systolic volume. Severe MR was defined by an effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area > or =20 mm(2). Thirty-three patients (58%) were responders at follow-up. Baseline ERO area and prevalence of severe MR were not different between responders and nonresponders (19 +/- 11 vs 21 +/- 13 mm(2), p = 0.67; 52% vs 53%, p = 0.84). In responders, MR was decreased by 58% (ERO 19 +/- 12 to 8 +/- 6 mm(2)). In the presence of viability in the region of the pacing lead, 74% (n = 29 patients) were responders (sensitivity 88%, specificity 58%); in the subgroup of patients with viability in the region of the pacing lead and severe MR, 83% (n = 17 patients) were responders. In conclusion, LV remodeling is frequent and ischemic MR decrease important in patients with viability in the region of the pacing lead without regard to MR severity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)