References of "Léonard, Angélique"
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See detailImage analysis of X-ray tomograms of sludge during convective drying in a pilot-scale fixed bed
Li, Jie ULg; Plougonven, Erwan ULg; Fraikin, Laurent ULg et al

in Chemical Engineering Science (2015), 134

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See detailConvective drying of a single cherry tomato: Modeling and experimental study
Bennamoun, Lyes; Khama, Reda; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Food and Bioproducts Processing (2015), 94

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See detailEnvironmental relevance of end of life vehicle valorisation - LCA of COMET case study
Groslambert, Sylvie ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Lewis, Grégory et al

Conference (2014, November 17)

LCA of Electric Vehicles Recycling : Comparison between three business lines of dismantling

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See detailINFLUENCE OF SLUDGE TREATEMENT ON ITS CONVECTIVE DRYING BEHAVIOR
Fraikin, Laurent ULg; Herbreteau, Benjamin; Salmon, Thierry ULg et al

Conference (2014, August 27)

Drying appears as a major step prior to valorization of sludge from wastewater treatment plant. This study uses an experimental design on different sludges to highlight the drying behavior according to ... [more ▼]

Drying appears as a major step prior to valorization of sludge from wastewater treatment plant. This study uses an experimental design on different sludges to highlight the drying behavior according to drying conditions, storage and extrusion. This research is performed with industrial view, but on a single cylinder sample, and focuses on five responds: maximum drying flux, time to reach 95% of dry matter, final volume, critical moisture and slowing-down coefficient. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling of a glass mineral wool process in view of Life Cycle Analysis
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Briard, Vincent; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Matériaux et Techniques (2014), 102(502),

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products ... [more ▼]

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products through LCA. Knauf Insulation has several glass wool factories in Europe that produce various products, and for a specific market, the same product can be produced in several factories. As the plants that produce glass wool work with similar pathways, a generic model for LCA usable for every plant and every glass wool product has been designed. The general principle of glass wool production is the following: the raw materials, sand, limestone, soda ash, borax, sodium carbonate, as well as recycled off-cuts from the production process, are weighed and mixed. Knauf Insulation also uses a large amount of recycled glass (cullet). The mix is sent to a furnace at high temperature (1350°C). The melted material is then fiberized and the binder is added, a process called forming. Knauf Insulation uses a special binder with ECOSE Technology, a new and formaldehyde-free binder. The wool fibers are collected, by suction, on a conveyor belt, and the mattress then goes through the curing oven. For some products a facing is added. Finally the product is compressed and packed. Specific attention is put in certain LCA aspects, such as allocations procedures, and we have used ISO 14040 and 14044 along with the ILCD handbook as guides during the model development. LCA is performed from raw materials extraction to end-of-life. Nevertheless, the impacts of the insulation system use phase are not included, as they strongly depend on parameters such as construction systems, etc. The functional unit is defined as 1 m3 of specific glass mineral wool product. The model, implemented in GaBi 6, is made as generic as possible by including, for each step, all the raw materials that can be used in one of the factories as well as all the energy sources. Parameters allow to define the amount of each raw material consumed, therefore the model can be adapted to any factory simply by setting these parameters accordingly. Moreover, the transport distances are also parameters and the origin of the energies (electricity or heat) can also be selected. This simplifies the data collection, since the template is the same for all the factories, it can be supported by data collection tools already existing. A part of the model is dedicated to weighting between factories, so a combination of factories can also be studied. This allows to study products sold on a specific market. The model can also be adapted to almost all Knauf Insulation products by using parameters where necessary: for example, several products have different binder contents, so a parameter defines the amount of binder. As some materials can be recycled between several parts of the process, special attention has been paid to recycling loops inside the model. The model is flexible enough to be used for Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) as well as for Eco-Design purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling of a glass mineral wool process in view of Life Cycle Analysis
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg; Briard, Vincent

Conference (2014, May 20)

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products ... [more ▼]

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products through LCA. Knauf Insulation has several glass wool factories in Europe that produce various products, and for a specific market, the same product can be produced in several factories. As the plants that produce glass wool work with similar pathways, a generic model for LCA usable for every plant and every glass wool product has been designed. The general principle of glass wool production is the following: the raw materials, sand, limestone, soda ash, borax, sodium carbonate, as well as recycled off-cuts from the production process, are weighed and mixed. Knauf Insulation also uses a large amount of recycled glass (cullet). The mix is sent to a furnace at high temperature (1350°C). The melted material is then fiberized and the binder is added, a process called forming. Knauf Insulation uses a special binder with ECOSE Technology, a new and formaldehyde-free binder. The wool fibers are collected, by suction, on a conveyor belt, and the mattress then goes through the curing oven. For some products a facing is added. Finally the product is compressed and packed. Specific attention is put in certain LCA aspects, such as allocations procedures, and we have used ISO 14040 and 14044 along with the ILCD handbook as guides dur-ing the model development. LCA is performed from raw materials extraction to end-of-life. Nevertheless, the impacts of the insulation system use phase are not included, as they strongly depend on parameters such as construction systems, etc. The functional unit is defined as 1 m3 of specific glass mineral wool product. The model, implemented in GaBi 6, is made as generic as possible by including, for each step, all the raw materials that can be used in one of the factories as well as all the energy sources. Parameters allow to define the amount of each raw material consumed, therefore the model can be adapted to any factory simply by setting these parameters accordingly. Moreover, the transport distances are also parameters and the origin of the energies (electricity or heat) can also be selected. This simplifies the data collection, since the template is the same for all the factories, it can be supported by data collection tools already existing. A part of the model is dedicated to weighting between factories, so a combination of factories can also be studied. This allows to study products sold on a specific market. The model can also be adapted to almost all Knauf Insulation products by using parameters where necessary: for example, several products have different binder contents, so a parameter defines the amount of binder. As some materials can be recycled between several parts of the process, special attention has been paid to recycling loops inside the model. The model is flexible enough to be used for Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) as well as for Eco-Design purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling of a glass mineral wool process in view of Life Cycle Analysis
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg; Briard, Vincent

Poster (2014, May 12)

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products ... [more ▼]

In line with the growing concern about the environmental impact of materials in the building sector, Knauf Insulation, a glass wool producer, is performing environmental impact assessment of its products through LCA. Knauf Insulation has several glass wool factories in Europe that produce various products, and for a specific market, the same product can be produced in several factories. As the plants that produce glass wool work with similar pathways, a generic model for LCA usable for every plant and every glass wool product has been designed. Moreover, combination of different factories is also possible. The general principle of glass wool production is the following: the raw materials, sand, limestone, soda ash, borax, sodium carbonate, as well as recycled off-cuts from the production process, are weighed and mixed. Knauf Insulation also uses a large amount of recycled glass (cullet). The mix is sent to a furnace at high temperature (1350°C). The melted material is then fiberized and the binder is added, a process called forming. Knauf Insulation uses a special binder with ECOSE Technology, a new and formaldehyde-free binder. The wool fibers are collected, by suction, on a conveyor belt, and the mattress then goes through the curing oven. For some product a facing is added. Finally the product is compressed and packed. The model, implemented in GaBi 6, is made as generic as possible by including, for each step, all the raw materials that can be used in one of the factories as well as all the energy sources. Parameters allow to define the amount of each raw material consumed, therefore the model can be adapted to any factory simply by setting these parameters accordingly. This also simplifies the data collection, since the template is the same for all the factories, it can be supported by data collection tools already existing. A part of the model is dedicated to weighting between factories, so a combination of factories can also be studied. The model can also be adapted to almost all Knauf Insulation products by using parameters where necessary: for example, several products have different binder contents, so a parameter defines the amount of binder. As some materials can be recycled between several parts of the process, special attention has been paid to recycling loops inside the model. The model is flexible enough to be used for Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) as well as for Eco-Design purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermination of the environmental footprint of the anthropic water cycle using LCA
Groslambert, Sylvie ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

Poster (2014, May)

The aim of this study is to describe the development of a life cycle assessment of drinking water in the Walloon Region, in Belgium. This study also includes rainwater harvesting as a complement to tap ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to describe the development of a life cycle assessment of drinking water in the Walloon Region, in Belgium. This study also includes rainwater harvesting as a complement to tap water. Data collected for this report are based on information available for 2010 as reference year. The functional unit is 1 m³ of water used by a Walloon citizen (including both rainwater and drinking water). [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of the Shrinkage Effect on Mass Transfer During Convective Drying of Sawdust/Sludge Mixtures
Li, Jie ULg; Bennamoun, Lyes; Fraikin, Laurent ULg et al

in Drying Technology (2014), 32

Convective drying of wastewater sludges and sawdust/sludge mixtures was studied. The first part of this work was an experimental study performed in a cross-flow convective dryer using 500 g of wet ... [more ▼]

Convective drying of wastewater sludges and sawdust/sludge mixtures was studied. The first part of this work was an experimental study performed in a cross-flow convective dryer using 500 g of wet material extruded through a disk with circular dies of 12 mm. The results showed that the sawdust addition has a positive impact on the drying process from a mass ratio of 2/8, on a dry basis, with observed drying rates higher than the original sludge. The second part of this work consisted of developing a drying model in order to identify the internal diffusion coefficient and convective mass transfer coefficient from the experimental data. A comparison was made between fitted drying curves, well represented by the Newton’s model, and the analytical solutions of the diffusion equation applied to a finite cylinder. Variations of dimensional characteristics such as the volume and exchange surface of the sample bed were obtained by X-ray tomography. This technique allowed confirm that shrinkage, which is an important phenomenon occurring during sludge and sawdust/mixture drying, must be taken into account. The results showed that both the internal diffusion coefficient and convective mass transfer coefficient were affected by mixing and sawdust addition. The internal diffusion coefficient changed from 7.77×10-9 m2/s for the original sludge to 7.01×10-9 m2/s for the mixed sludge and then increased to 8.35×10-9 m2/s for the mixture of a mass ratio of 4/6. The convective mass transfer coefficient changed from 9.70×10-8 m/s for the original sludge to 8.67×10-8 m/s for the mixed sludge and then increased to 12.09×10-8 m/s for the mixture of a mass ratio of 4/6. These results confirmed that sawdust addition was beneficial to the sludge drying process as the mass transfer efficiency between the air and material increased. Reinforcing the texture of sludge by adding sawdust can increase the drying rate and decrease the drying time, and then the heat energy supply will be reduced significantly. The study also showed that neglecting shrinkage phenomenon resulted in an overestimation for the internal diffusion coefficient for the convective drying of sludges and sawdust/sludge mixtures. [less ▲]

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See detailCoupling X-ray microtomography and macroscopic soil measurements: a method to enhance near saturation functions?
Beckers, Eléonore ULg; Plougonven, Erwan; Gigot, Nicolas et al

in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (2014), 18

Agricultural management practices influence soil structure, but the characterization of these modifications and consequences are still not completely understood. In this study, we aim at improving water ... [more ▼]

Agricultural management practices influence soil structure, but the characterization of these modifications and consequences are still not completely understood. In this study, we aim at improving water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves using both classical soil techniques and X-ray microtomography in the context of tillage simplification. We show a good match for retention and conductivity functions between macroscopic measurements and microtomographic information. Microtomography highlights the presence of a secondary pore system. Analysis of structural parameters for these pores appears to be significant and offers additional clues for objects differentiation. We show that relatively fast scans supply not only good results, but also enhance near saturation characterization, making microtomography a highly competitive instrument for routine soil characterization. [less ▲]

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See detailX-ray microtomography: A porosity-based thresholding method to improve soil pore network characterization?
Beckers, Eléonore ULg; Plougonven, Erwan ULg; Roisin, Christian et al

in Geoderma (2014), 219-220

X-ray microtomography, through quantification of soil structure at the microscale, could greatly facilitate the current understanding of soil hydrodynamic behaviour. However, binarisation method and ... [more ▼]

X-ray microtomography, through quantification of soil structure at the microscale, could greatly facilitate the current understanding of soil hydrodynamic behaviour. However, binarisation method and processing choices are subjective and can have a strong impact on results and conclusions. In this study, we test a new method based on the porosity detectable by X-ray microtomography, while validation is achieved through comparison of soil microtomogram information with soil physical measurements. These measurements consist of water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using two different soil populations with only structural differences. To assess the porosity-based method performances, we compare it to four other methods, namely the global method of Otsu and three recent soil-dedicated local methods. The robustness of the porosity-based method is also tested in regard to different pre-processing procedures. In this paper we demonstrate that soil segmentation through a porosity-based method is an interesting issue. Indeed, it is less demanding in terms of time and computational requirements than its alternatives, and combines robustness and performances broadly comparable with the recent local methods. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparation of polyaniline-modified local clay and study of its sorption capacity
Benhebal, Hadj; Chaid, Messaoud; Léonard, Angélique ULg et al

in Journal of Nanostructure in Chemistry (2014), 4(98), 6

Clay minerals are frequently used in adsorption processes with aqueous solution; it was found that the adsorption properties of clays change when the samples are modified. In this context, polyaniline ... [more ▼]

Clay minerals are frequently used in adsorption processes with aqueous solution; it was found that the adsorption properties of clays change when the samples are modified. In this context, polyaniline-modified clay nanocomposite (at 10 %) was prepared by in situ polymerization processes. The structural and morphological characteristics of the synthesized material are systematically examined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The adsorption property of the modified clay was evaluated for the removal of a reactive dye (methylene blue) from aqueous solution at room temperature (25 C) via batch adsorption. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental study on dehumidification/regeneration of liquid desiccant: LiBr solution
Bouzenada, Smain Nasr Eddine; Kaabi, Abdennacer N; Fraikin, Laurent ULg et al

in Procedia Computer Science (2014), 32

The growing demand for air conditioning has caused a significant increase in demand for energy resources. The traditional commercial, non natural working fluids, like CFC, HCFC and HFC result in both ... [more ▼]

The growing demand for air conditioning has caused a significant increase in demand for energy resources. The traditional commercial, non natural working fluids, like CFC, HCFC and HFC result in both ozone depletion and global warming emission of CO2. The use of hygroscopic salts in direct contact with moist air provides an attractive alternative to conventional cooling systems. The liquid desiccant can substitute the dangerous fluids. The main operations in Liquid Desiccant Cooling System (LDCS) are dehumidification and regeneration. This paper presents an experimental study of dehumidification/regeneration processes using LiBr as liquid desiccant in direct contact with the air at different operating conditions. An analysis of the mass transfer is made in order to prove is this material is the best liquid desiccant for LDCS. Experimental results showed the effect of air conditions on mass transfer. It can be seen that LiBr is able to absorb moisture and can be regenerated at low temperature. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detail“Product-oriented engineering” applied to the development of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering
de Bien, Charlotte ULg; Ounally, T; Collard, Valérie ULg et al

in 7th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography (2014)

This work applies a “product-oriented engineering” approach to the development of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering. Polylactic acid scaffolds were obtained by a freeze-drying process. Their 2D/3D ... [more ▼]

This work applies a “product-oriented engineering” approach to the development of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering. Polylactic acid scaffolds were obtained by a freeze-drying process. Their 2D/3D microstructure was characterized by X-ray microtomography and related to the operating conditions used. Two types of scaffold end-use properties were characterized in relation to their microstructure: the mechanical and the transport properties. Scaffold young's modulus was computed from data measured on tension-compression devices. To evaluate the permeability, Darcy’s experiments were carried out. The obtained results allowed highlighting the quantitative relationships existing between elaboration conditions, microstructure and end-use properties of the fabricated PLA scaffolds. © 2014 International Society for Industrial Process Tomography. [less ▲]

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