References of "Joris, Jean"
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See detailLaparoscopic adrenalectomy in pheochromocytoma and Cushing's syndrome. Reflections about two case reports.
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Joris, Jean ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1994), 94(6), 301-6

Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is possible as well on the left as on the right side using a percutaneous transabdominal approach. The exposure of the glands seems better than it could be achieved with an open ... [more ▼]

Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is possible as well on the left as on the right side using a percutaneous transabdominal approach. The exposure of the glands seems better than it could be achieved with an open method. In combination with intraoperative infusion of nicardipine, a calcium-channel blocker, the laparoscopic removal of a pheochromocytoma was performed safely and under stable conditions. In case of Cushing's syndrome, the laparoscopic approach reduces the problems related to poor healing. In all cases of laparoscopic adrenalectomy, this approach could offer the clear advantages of smaller incisions, reduced postoperative pain and incisional discomfort as well as complications related to large and invasive procedure and finally allows quicker recovery. Moreover, conversion to open surgery remains always possible, if needed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe peripheral analgesic effects of opiods
Joris, Jean ULg; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

in APS Journal (1993), 2(1), 51-59

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See detailHemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Joris, Jean ULg; Noirot, Didier P; Legrand, Marc ULg et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (1993), 76(5), 1067-71

Hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia (isoflurane in N2O/O2 (50%)) were investigated in 15 nonobese ASA Class I patients by using invasive hemodynamic monitoring ... [more ▼]

Hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia (isoflurane in N2O/O2 (50%)) were investigated in 15 nonobese ASA Class I patients by using invasive hemodynamic monitoring including a flow-directed pulmonary artery catheter. During surgery, intraabdominal pressure was maintained automatically at 14 mm Hg by a CO2 insufflator, and minute ventilation was controlled and adjusted to avoid hypercapnia. Hemodynamics were measured before anesthesia, after the induction of anesthesia, after tilting into 10 degrees head-up position, 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min after peritoneal insufflation, and 30 min after exsufflation. Induction of anesthesia decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac index (CI). Tilting the patient to the head-up position reduced cardiac preload and caused further reduction of CI. Peritoneal insufflation resulted in a significant increase (+/- 35%) of mean arterial pressure, a significant reduction (+/- 20%) of CI, and a significant increase of systemic (+/- 65%) and pulmonary (+/- 90%) vascular resistances. The combined effect of anesthesia, head-up tilt, and peritoneal insufflation produced a 50% decrease in CI. Administration of increasing concentrations of isoflurane, via its vasodilatory activity, may have partially blunted these hemodynamic changes. These results demonstrate that laparoscopy for cholecystectomy in head-up position results in significant hemodynamic changes in healthy patients, particularly at the induction of pneumoperitoneum. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal intravenous anesthesia in South-African genetic porphyria (variegate porphyria)
Bichel, Th; Joris, Jean ULg; Jacquet, N. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1993), 44(1), 25-29

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See detailAnalgésie médullaire. Association anesthésiques locaux - opiacés: modalités d'utilisation
Joris, Jean ULg

in Analgésie péri-opératoire (1993)

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See detailUne salle d'analgésie postopératoire: une alternative à l'Acute Pain Service
Joris, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Douleur et analgésie (1993), 2

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See detailLes morphinomimétiques en réanimation
Lamy, Maurice ULg; Joris, Jean ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Réan urg (1993), 2(4bis), 488-494

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See detailClonidine and ketanserin both are effective treatment for postanesthetic shivering.
Joris, Jean ULg; Banache, Maryse; Bonnet, Francis et al

in Anesthesiology (1993), 79(3), 532-9

BACKGROUND: Although meperidine is an effective treatment of postanesthetic shivering, its mechanism of action remains unknown. Investigation of other drugs might help clarify the mechanisms by which ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although meperidine is an effective treatment of postanesthetic shivering, its mechanism of action remains unknown. Investigation of other drugs might help clarify the mechanisms by which shivering can be controlled. Accordingly, we investigated the efficacy of clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and ketanserin, a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist, in treating postanesthetic shivering. METHODS: First, 54 patients shivering after general anesthesia were allocated randomly to receive an intravenous bolus of saline, 150 micrograms clonidine, or 10 mg ketanserin. A second study explored the dose-dependence of clonidine. Forty shivering patients were given saline or clonidine, 37.5, 75, or 150 micrograms. RESULTS: The duration of shivering was significantly shorter in those given clonidine (2.1 +/- 0.9 min) than in the other two groups and shorter in the ketanserin group (4.3 +/- 0.9 min) than in the saline group (12.0 +/- 1.6 min). Clonidine and ketanserin significantly decreased systolic arterial blood pressure when compared to saline. Core rewarming was significantly slower in the clonidine group. In the second study, 37.5 micrograms clonidine was no more effective than saline. Two minutes after treatment, 150 micrograms obliterated shivering in all patients. Five minutes after treatment, all patients given 75 micrograms had stopped shivering. Systolic arterial pressure and heart rate decreased significantly in patients given 75 and 150 micrograms clonidine. CONCLUSIONS: Clonidine (150 micrograms) and ketanserin (10 mg) both are effective treatment for postanesthetic shivering. The effect of clonidine on shivering is dose-dependent: whereas 37.5 micrograms had no effect, 75 micrograms clonidine stopped shivering within 5 min. [less ▲]

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See detailLaparoscopy, urology, and gynaecology
Joris, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology (1993), 6

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See detailAnalgésie postopératoire après thoracotomie
Joris, Jean ULg

in Conférences d'actualisation 1993 (1993)

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See detailAnalgésie postopératoire par analgésie péridurale autocontrôlée
Joris, Jean ULg

in Douleur et analgésie (1993), 4

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See detailAmiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis: is there a place for surgery?
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg; D'Silva, Milbhor et al

in World Journal of Surgery (1993), 17(5), 622-6627

Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism has on most instances been reported as mild, and thyroid functions return to normal after discontinuation of the drug. Nevertheless, life-threatening amiodarone-induced ... [more ▼]

Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism has on most instances been reported as mild, and thyroid functions return to normal after discontinuation of the drug. Nevertheless, life-threatening amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis has also been described. Conventional treatments such as antithyroid drugs (thionamide) and corticosteroids are essentially ineffective or fail to alter the dramatic course of the thyroid crisis. This limited effectiveness of medical therapy, particularly in patients with previously neglected or unknown thyroid disease, prompted us to intervene surgically. We report a series of nine patients who underwent total or near-total thyroidectomy as a first-line therapy for five of them. Surgery resulted in rapid resolution of thyrotoxicosis with an uneventful postoperative course. This approach has the advantage of immediate effectivity, low risk of relapse, and appears to be the only treatment that permits continued therapy with amiodarone when the drug appears needed to control a life-threatening arrhythmia. [less ▲]

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See detailLaparoscopic surgery, urology and gynaecology
Joris, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology (1993), 6

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See detailMetabolic and respiratory changes after cholecystectomy performed via laparotomy or laparoscopy.
Joris, Jean ULg; Cigarini, I.; Legrand, Marc ULg et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (1992), 69(4), 341-5

We have compared metabolic and respiratory changes after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 15) with those after open cholecystectomy (n = 15). The durations of postoperative i.v. therapy, fasting and ... [more ▼]

We have compared metabolic and respiratory changes after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 15) with those after open cholecystectomy (n = 15). The durations of postoperative i.v. therapy, fasting and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the laparoscopy group. During the first and second days after operation, analgesic consumption but not pain scores (visual analogue scale) were significantly smaller after laparoscopy, while vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and PaO2 were significantly greater. The metabolic and acute phase responses (glucose, leucocytosis, C-reactive protein) were less after laparoscopy compared with laparotomy. Although plasma cortisol and catecholamine concentrations were not significantly different between the two groups, after surgery interleukin-6 concentrations were less in the laparoscopy group. [less ▲]

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See detailPlace des morphiniques en réanimation
Joris, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

(1992)

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See detailAspects chirurgicaux du traitement des affections surrenaliennes.
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Dewandre, J. M.; Pirenne, J. et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1991), 91(2), 107-11

With the greatly enhanced accuracy of current endocrinologic diagnosis assisted by precise diagnostic imaging, together with greatly enhanced preparation of patients with endocrinopathy for safer ... [more ▼]

With the greatly enhanced accuracy of current endocrinologic diagnosis assisted by precise diagnostic imaging, together with greatly enhanced preparation of patients with endocrinopathy for safer anesthetic and surgical procedure (e.g. adrenal cortical cancers, cortisol and aldosterone producing adenomas and pheochromocytomas), operative procedures can be planned and conducted more precisely. For the surgeon, the strategy for treatment of functional and neoplastic disorders of the adrenal glands has essentially to consider the anatomy of the suprarenal glands, the deleterious effects of hormone excess before and during operation, the presumed nature of incidentally discovered adrenal mass and the size of the tumor. [less ▲]

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See detailInterpleural, intercostal and thoracic epidural analgesia
Joris, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology (1991), 4

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See detailChoice of sedation according to ventilatory mode
Lamy, Maurice ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; Joris, Jean ULg

in Journal of drug development (1991), 4(Suppl 3), 77-81

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See detailOpiates suppress carrageenan-induced edema and hyperthermia at doses that inhibit hyperalgesia
Joris, Jean ULg; Costello, A.; Dubner et al

in Pain (1990), 43

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See detailRelease from inflamed tissue of a substance with properties similar to corticotropin-releasing factor.
Hargreaves, K. M.; Costello, A. H.; Joris, Jean ULg

in Neuroendocrinology (1989), 49(5), 476-82

In response to stressors involving tissue injury, pituitary corticotroph secretion of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (iB-END) could be either due to release of hypothalamic factors such as corticotropin ... [more ▼]

In response to stressors involving tissue injury, pituitary corticotroph secretion of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (iB-END) could be either due to release of hypothalamic factors such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or to release of a tissue factor from the periphery. In the present experiments, we investigated whether inflamed tissue releases a factor which evokes pituitary secretion of iB-END. In an initial experiment, rats with an inflamed hindpaw due to carrageenan injection had significantly greater levels of circulating iB-END as compared to rats with saline-injected paws. Removal of afferent input, by hindlimb denervation, failed to block the carrageenan-induced increase in iB-END levels. Subcutaneous perfusates were then collected from inflamed and control hindlimbs and applied to rat anterior pituitary cell cultures. Pituitary release of iB-END due to administration of perfusate from inflamed paws was significantly greater than iB-END release due to perfusate from saline-injected paws or to basal release. The releasing activity in the perfusates was blocked in calcium-free medium and was not due to a direct action of carrageenan, bradykinin, substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide. The results indicate that inflamed tissue releases a CRF-like factor which stimulates iB-END release both in the denervated rat and cultured pituitary cells. [less ▲]

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