References of "Joris, Jean"
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See detailUtilisation de la ropivacaine par voie peridurale pour l'analgesie postoperatoire.
Senard, Marc ULg; Joris, Jean ULg

in Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (2002), 21(9), 713-24

OBJECTIVES: To describe pharmacology and toxicology of ropivacaine. To assess the clinical efficacy of ropivacaine when used for postoperative epidural analgesia and to provide recommendations for ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To describe pharmacology and toxicology of ropivacaine. To assess the clinical efficacy of ropivacaine when used for postoperative epidural analgesia and to provide recommendations for clinical practice. DATA SOURCES: Search in the Medline data base of original articles in French and English published since 1995, using the following key words: ropivacaine, postoperative analgesia, epidural, caudal block. STUDY SELECTION: Prospective randomised studies in adults and children were selected. Letters to editors and editorials were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION: Articles have been analyzed: to determine the dose of ropivacaine required for postoperative epidural analgesia, to assess the benefits of combination of epidural ropivacaine and additives (opioids or other), to compare epidural ropivacaine and bupivacaine and to assess the use of ropivacaine via caudal route for paediatric postoperative analgesia. DATA SYNTHESIS: 20 mg h-1 of ropivacaine is required to provide effective analgesia. This dose produces a motor block in a significant number of patients. Combination with an opioid allows for a reduction in ropivacaine requirement and subsequently in the incidence of motor blockade. In adults, equipotency ratio of ropivacaine and bupivacaine varies between 1.5/1 and 1/1 depending upon the concentration used. At equipotent doses, early postoperative mobilisation is facilitated with ropivacaine. In case of paediatric caudal analgesia, this ratio is close to 1. CONCLUSIONS: Epidural ropivacaine combined with opioid provide good postoperative pain relief. Reduction in the incidence of motor blockade and safe toxicological profile make this local anaesthetic a suitable alternative of bupivacaine for postoperative epidural analgesia. [less ▲]

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See detailLe deficit en alpha-1 antitrypsine. Une indication de transplantation hepatique pediatrique
De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg; Honore, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(11), 753-8

Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is the most common inborn error of metabolism leading to liver transplantation, and the second cause of liver transplantation in children after biliary atresia. The authors ... [more ▼]

Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is the most common inborn error of metabolism leading to liver transplantation, and the second cause of liver transplantation in children after biliary atresia. The authors report the case of a 6-year-old girl, who was suffering from end-stage liver disease secondary to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. She was successfully treated by whole liver transplantation, the hepatic graft coming from a 3-year-old donor. Three months later she went back to school. The authors discuss the pathogenesis and the natural history of this frequent cause of liver transplantation in children. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis
Detroz, Bernard ULg; Marchettini, P.; Joris, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2001, January), 64(1), 80

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See detailLiver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses
Detry, Olivier ULg; Honoré, Pierre ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2001, January), 64(1), 53

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See detail120 laparoscopic sigmoidectomies in diverticulitis: a 9 years experience
Detroz, Bernard ULg; Moscato; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2001, January), 64(1), 49

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See detailAnaesthesia for laparoscopic surgery
Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg; Joris, Jean ULg

in Current Anaesthesia and Critical Care (2001), 12

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See detailTransition between anesthesia and post-operative analgesia: relevance of intra-operative administration of analgesics.
Joris, Jean ULg; Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2001), 52(3), 271-9

The rapid awakening without residual analgesic effect seen with the new "fast-in-fast-out" anesthetic agents forces us to anticipate post-operative pain management. More then ever, "balanced analgesia ... [more ▼]

The rapid awakening without residual analgesic effect seen with the new "fast-in-fast-out" anesthetic agents forces us to anticipate post-operative pain management. More then ever, "balanced analgesia" appears the key for successful transition between anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. This review focuses on practical aspects seeking to answer the following questions: which analgesics should be used?; how should they be given?; at what stage of the anesthetic time should they be injected? In the absence of a loco-regional technique, analgesics must be given before the end of surgery to obtain a quiet awakening. The transition in this delicate period may be facilitated by the intra-operative use of various adjuvant therapies such as ketamine, lidocaine infusion, clonidine, and magnesium, that reduce the needs for opioid and/or post-operative pain severity. All non-opioid analgesics (propacetamol, NSAIDs, tramadol) must be given according to their pharmacokinetic characteristics, indications and contraindications to ensure the required analgesic effect is effective at the time of awakening. If tramadol is not used, an initial dose of a long-acting opioid should be given 20-30 minutes before the end of surgery. Insufficient analgesia must be corrected by titrating an opioid intravenously before allowing the patient to control his/her analgesia using a PCA pump. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractions between systemic analgesics.
Joris, Jean ULg; Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2001), 52(4), 395-401

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See detailAnesthesia for laparoscopic surgery
Joris, Jean ULg

in Miller, Ronald D (Ed.) Anesthesia (Fifth edition) (2000)

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See detailComment utiliser l'hypnose en anesthésie
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Joris, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Praticien en Anesthésie Réanimation (Le) (2000), 4(6), 345-348

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See detailL'hypnosedation, un nouveau mode d'anesthesie pour la chirurgie endocrinienne cervicale. Etude prospective randomisee.
Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Degauque, C.; Fumal, I. et al

in Annales de Chirurgie (2000), 125(6), 539-46

Retrospective studies have confirmed the feasibility and safety of thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed under hypnoanesthesia (hypnosis, local anesthesia and minimal conscious sedation) as sole ... [more ▼]

Retrospective studies have confirmed the feasibility and safety of thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed under hypnoanesthesia (hypnosis, local anesthesia and minimal conscious sedation) as sole method of anesthesia. This very effective technique seems to provide physiological, psychological and economic benefits for the patient. STUDY AIM: To assess, by means of a prospective randomized study, the advantages of hypnosedation as an alternative to general anesthesia in terms of clinical and laboratory parameters. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty patients operated under hypnoanesthesia were compared to 20 patients operated under conventional anesthesia. The two groups were compared in terms of inflammatory, neuroendocrine, hemodynamic and immunologic parameters and postoperative course (pain, fatigue, muscle strength and stress). RESULTS: No clinical or demographic differences were observed between the two groups. Operative times, bleeding, weight of specimens, and surgical comfort were similar. Significant differences in terms of inflammatory response and hemodynamic parameters were observed in favor of hypnoanesthesia. Neuroendocrine and immunological parameters were similar. Patients of the hypnoanesthesia group had significantly less postoperative pain. Postoperative fatigue syndrome and convalescence were significantly improved in these patients. CONCLUSION: This study confirms that, in our hands, hypnosedation presents real advantages over general anesthesia, in patients undergoing thyroid surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailBilateral neck exploration under hypnosedation. A new standard of care in primary hyperparathyroidism?
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg et al

in Annals of Surgery (1999), 229

OBJECTIVE: The authors review their experience with initial bilateral neck exploration under local anesthesia and hypnosedation for primary hyperparathyroidism. Efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The authors review their experience with initial bilateral neck exploration under local anesthesia and hypnosedation for primary hyperparathyroidism. Efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness of this new approach are examined. BACKGROUND: Standard bilateral parathyroid exploration under general anesthesia is associated with significant risk, especially in an elderly population. Image-guided unilateral approaches, although theoretically less invasive, expose patients to the potential risk of missing multiple adenomas or asymmetric hyperplasia. Initial bilateral neck exploration under hypnosedation may maximize the strengths of both approaches while minimizing their weaknesses. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 121 initial cervicotomies for primary hyperparathyroidism performed between 1995 and 1997, 31 patients were selected on the basis of their own request to undergo a conventional bilateral neck exploration under local anesthesia and hypnosedation. Neither preoperative testing of hypnotic susceptibility nor expensive localization studies were done. A hypnotic state (immobility, subjective well-being, and increased pain thresholds) was induced within 10 minutes; restoration of a fully conscious state was obtained within several seconds. Patient comfort and quiet surgical conditions were ensured by local anesthesia of the collar incision and minimal intravenous sedation titrated throughout surgery. Both peri- and postoperative records were examined to assess the safety and efficacy of this new approach. RESULTS: No conversion to general anesthesia was needed. No complications were observed. All the patients were cured with a mean follow-up of 18 +/- 12 months. Mean operating time was <1 hour. Four glands were identified in 84% of cases, three glands in 9.7%. Adenomas were found in 26 cases; among these, 6 were ectopic. Hyperplasia, requiring subtotal parathyroidectomy and transcervical thymectomy, was found in five cases (16.1%), all of which had gone undetected by localization studies when requested by the referring physicians. Concomitant thyroid lobectomy was performed in four cases. Patient comfort and recovery and surgical conditions were evaluated on visual analog scales as excellent. Postoperative analgesic consumption was minimal. Mean length of hospital stay was 1.5 +/- 0.5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Initial bilateral neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism can be performed safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively under hypnosedation, which may therefore be proposed as a new standard of care. [less ▲]

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See detailHypnoanesthesia for endocrine cervical surgery: a statement of practice.
Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Meurisse, Michel ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg et al

in Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine : Research on Paradigm, Practice, & Policy (1999), 5(6), 509-20

OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of endocrine cervical surgery under hypnoanesthesia as a valuable, safe, efficient, and economic alternative to general anesthesia. METHODS: Between April 1994 and ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of endocrine cervical surgery under hypnoanesthesia as a valuable, safe, efficient, and economic alternative to general anesthesia. METHODS: Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnoanesthesia (HYP) using Erikson's method. Operative data and postoperative course of this initial series were compared to a contemporary population of patients (n = 119) clinically similar except that they declined HYP or were judged unsuitable for it, and who were therefore operated on under general anesthesia (GA). RESULTS: The surgeons all reported better operating conditions for cervicotomy using HYP. Conversion from hypnosis to GA was needed in two cases (1%). All patients having HYP reported a pleasant experience and, keeping in mind that the GA group is not a randomly assigned control group, both had significantly less postoperative pain and analgesic use. Hospital stay was also significantly shorter, providing a substantial reduction in the costs of medical care. The postoperative convalescence was significantly improved after HYP and a full return to social or professional activity was significantly quicker. CONCLUSION: From this study, we conclude that HYP is an effective technique for providing relief of intraoperative and postoperative pain in endocrine cervical surgery. The technique results in high patient satisfaction and better surgical convalescence. This technique can therefore be used in most well-chosen patients and reduces the socioeconomic impact of hospitalization. [less ▲]

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See detailAnesthesie generale versus anesthesie perimedullaire.
Murayi, P.; Joris, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(7), 588-92

Perimedullary anesthetic techniques (epidural or spinal anesthesia), by themselves or combined with general anesthesia offer several advantages in the postoperative period when compared with general ... [more ▼]

Perimedullary anesthetic techniques (epidural or spinal anesthesia), by themselves or combined with general anesthesia offer several advantages in the postoperative period when compared with general anesthesia alone. The incidence of postoperative respiratory and cardiovascular complications is decreased. The physiologic stress reaction, with its associated hypercoagulable state and immune depression, is attenuated. Finally, the resumption of gastrointestinal function is hastened. These benefits of central neural blockade are noted most clearly when the techniques are used for several days postoperatively, most often by catheter based epidural analgesia. The use of local anesthetic agents in the analgesic mixture would appear to be important. This is likely because these substances inhibit the sympathetic nervous system and spinal reflex axes. The role of this inhibition in the advantages of perimedullary techniques is probably important. It is important to note that inhibition of the sympathatetic nervous system can be associated with indesirable consequences in certain patients. These techniques must therefore be used cautiously, and patients who benefit from them must receive careful surveillance. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic changes and catecholamine release during laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma.
Joris, Jean ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg; Hartstein, Gary ULg et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (1999), 88(1), 16-21

We investigated hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations in eight consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected pheochromocytoma. The same anesthesia protocol was ... [more ▼]

We investigated hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations in eight consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected pheochromocytoma. The same anesthesia protocol was used in all patients: a continuous infusion of sufentanil 0.5 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1) and isoflurane 0.4% (end-tidal) in 50% N2O/O2. Systolic arterial pressure was maintained between 120 and 160 mm Hg by adjusting an infusion of nicardipine, a calcium-channel blocker, while tachycardia (>100 bpm) was treated by 1-mg boluses of atenolol. Hemodynamics (thermodilution technique) and plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured before surgery, after the induction of anesthesia, after turning the patient to the lateral position, during pneumoperitoneum, during tumor manipulation, after adrenalectomy, and at the end of surgery. Two events resulted in significant catecholamine release: creation of the pneumoperitoneum and adrenal gland manipulation. As a consequence, a twofold increase in cardiac output was recorded. Adjustments of nicardipine infusion (2-6 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) minimized changes in mean arterial pressure. Beta-adrenergic blockade was necessary in six patients. In conclusion, laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma results in marked catecholamine release during pneumoperitoneum and tumor manipulation. Titration of a nicardipine infusion allowed easy and quick control of the hemodynamic aberrancies related to these processes. IMPLICATIONS: Pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopy, now used for adrenalectomy, may complicate anesthetic management of patients with pheochromocytoma. In this study, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with catecholamine release during the creation of pneumoperitoneum and tumor manipulation. Adjustments of a nicardipine infusion readily attenuated the subsequent hemodynamic aberrancies. [less ▲]

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See detailHypnosis with conscious sedation instead of general anaesthesia? Applications in cervical endocrine surgery.
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1999), 99(4), 151-8

Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnosedation (HYP) and compared to the operative data and postoperative ... [more ▼]

Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnosedation (HYP) and compared to the operative data and postoperative courses of a closely-matched population (n = 121) of patients operated on under general anaesthesia (GA). Conversion from hypnosis to GA was needed in two cases (1%). All surgeons reported better operating conditions for cervicotomy using HYP. All patients having HYP reported a very pleasant experience and had significantly less postoperative pain while analgesic use was significantly reduced in this group. Hospital stay was also significantly shorter, providing a substantial reduction of the medical care costs. The postoperative convalescence was significantly improved after HYP and full return to social or professional activity was significantly shortened. We conclude that HYP is a very efficient technique providing physiological, psychological and economic benefits to the patient. [less ▲]

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See detailTransplantation combinée du foie et du coeur chez un patient souffrant de thalassémie majeure
Detry, Olivier ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Honore, Pierre ULg et al

in Médecine & Chirurgie Digestives (1999), 28(3), 109-110

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See detailL'hypnose et son application en chirurgie.
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Joris, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(7), 414-8

Since 1992, we have used hypnosis routinely in more than 1400 patients undergoing surgery. We found that hypnosis used in patients as an adjunct to conscious sedation and local anesthesia was associated ... [more ▼]

Since 1992, we have used hypnosis routinely in more than 1400 patients undergoing surgery. We found that hypnosis used in patients as an adjunct to conscious sedation and local anesthesia was associated with improved intraoperative patient comfort, and with reduced anxiety, pain, intraoperative requirements for anxiolytic and analgesic drugs, optimal surgical conditions and a faster recovery of the patient. We reported our clinical experience and our fundamental research. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic changes induced by laparoscopy and their endocrine correlates: effects of clonidine.
Joris, Jean ULg; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (1998), 32(5), 1389-96

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes induced by PNO by reducing release of catecholamines and vasopressin. BACKGROUND: Both mechanical and neurohumoral factors contribute to the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide PNO. Several mediators have been proposed, but no study has correlated hemodynamic changes with changes in levels of these potential mediators. METHODS: We conducted two studies, each including 20 healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the first study serial measurements of hemodynamics (thermodilution technique) were done during laparoscopy and after exsufflation. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines, vasopressin, renin, endothelin and prostaglandins were measured at the same time points. In the second study patients were randomly allocated to receive 8 microg/kg clonidine infused over 1 h or placebo before PNO. Hemodynamics and plasma levels of cortisol, catecholamines and vasopressin were measured during PNO and after exsufflation. RESULTS: Peritoneal insufflation resulted in a significant reduction of cardiac output (18+/-4%) and increases in mean arterial pressure (39+/-8%) and systemic (70+/-12%) and pulmonary (98+/-18%) vascular resistances. Laparoscopy resulted in progressive and significant increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and renin. Vasopressin plasma concentrations markedly increased immediately after the beginning of PNO (before PNO 6+/-4 pg/ml; during PNO 129+/-42 pg/ml; p < 0.05). The profile of vasopressin release paralleled the time course of changes in systemic vascular resistance. Prostaglandins and endothelin did not change significantly. Clonidine significantly reduced mean arterial pressure, heart rate and the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Clonidine also significantly reduced catecholamine concentrations but did not alter vasopressin and cortisol plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Vasopressin and catecholamines probably mediate the increase in systemic vascular resistance observed during PNO. Clonidine before PNO reduces catecholamine release and attenuates hemodynamic changes during laparoscopy. [less ▲]

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