References of "Joris, Bernard"
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See detailTemperature dependence of mycosubtilin homologue production in Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633.
Fickers, Patrick ULg; Leclere, Valerie; Guez, Jean*-Sebastien et al

in Research in Microbiology (2008), 159(6), 449-57

Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633 produces mycosubtilin, a non-ribosomally synthesized lipopeptide of the iturin family which presents antagonistic activities toward various phytopathogens. Different homologues ... [more ▼]

Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633 produces mycosubtilin, a non-ribosomally synthesized lipopeptide of the iturin family which presents antagonistic activities toward various phytopathogens. Different homologues with fatty acid moiety varying from C15 to C17 are usually co-produced, with their biological activities increasing with the number of carbons in the fatty acid chain. In the present report, we highlight that growth temperature modulates both the extent of mycosubtilin production and the relative abundance of the different homologues. A 30-fold increase in mycosubtilin production was observed when the temperature was decreased from 37 degrees C to 25 degrees C for both strain ATCC6633 and its derivative BBG100, a constitutive mycosubtilin overproducer. However, no significant difference in either the expression of the mycosubtilin synthetase encoding genes or in the intracellular synthetase concentration could be found, suggesting that the observed phenotype originated from a higher mycosubtilin synthetase turnover at lower temperature. We also point out that lower growth temperature leads to an increased proportion of odd-numbered fatty acid homologues as a consequence of de novo synthesis of C17 anteiso fatty acid following cell adaptation to low temperatures. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystal structure and activity of Bacillus subtilis YoaJ (EXLX1), a bacterial expansin that promotes root colonization.
Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Amoroso, Ana Maria ULg; Herman, Raphaël ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(44), 16876-81

We solved the crystal structure of a secreted protein, EXLX1, encoded by the yoaJ gene of Bacillus subtilis. Its structure is remarkably similar to that of plant beta-expansins (group 1 grass pollen ... [more ▼]

We solved the crystal structure of a secreted protein, EXLX1, encoded by the yoaJ gene of Bacillus subtilis. Its structure is remarkably similar to that of plant beta-expansins (group 1 grass pollen allergens), consisting of 2 tightly packed domains (D1, D2) with a potential polysaccharide-binding surface spanning the 2 domains. Domain D1 has a double-psi beta-barrel fold with partial conservation of the catalytic site found in family 45 glycosyl hydrolases and in the MltA family of lytic transglycosylases. Domain D2 has an Ig-like fold similar to group 2/3 grass pollen allergens, with structural features similar to a type A carbohydrate-binding domain. EXLX1 bound to plant cell walls, cellulose, and peptidoglycan, but it lacked lytic activity against a variety of plant cell wall polysaccharides and peptidoglycan. EXLX1 promoted plant cell wall extension similar to, but 10 times weaker than, plant beta-expansins, which synergistically enhanced EXLX1 activity. Deletion of the gene encoding EXLX1 did not affect growth or peptidoglycan composition of B. subtilis in liquid medium, but slowed lysis upon osmotic shock and greatly reduced the ability of the bacterium to colonize maize roots. The presence of EXLX1 homologs in a small but diverse set of plant pathogens further supports a role in plant-bacterial interactions. Because plant expansins have proved difficult to express in active form in heterologous systems, the discovery of a bacterial homolog opens the door for detailed structural studies of expansin function. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural and mechanistic basis of penicillin-binding protein inhibition by lactivicins
Macheboeuf, Pauline; Fischer, Delphine S; Brown, Tom Jr et al

in Nature Chemical Biology (2007), 3(9), 565-569

beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which are essential for bacterial cell wall biogenesis. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved ... [more ▼]

beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which are essential for bacterial cell wall biogenesis. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved efficient antibiotic resistance mechanisms that, in Gram-positive bacteria, include mutations to PBPs that enable them to avoid beta-lactam inhibition(1). Lactivicin (LTV; 1) contains separate cycloserine and c-lactone rings and is the only known natural PBP inhibitor that does not contain a beta-lactam(2-4). Here we show that LTV and a more potent analog, phenoxyacetyl-LTV (PLTV; 2), are active against clinically isolated, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. Crystallographic analyses of S. pneumoniae PBP1b reveal that LTV and PLTV inhibition involves opening of both monocyclic cycloserine and gamma-lactone rings. In PBP1b complexes, the ring-derived atoms from LTV and PLTV show a notable structural convergence with those derived from a complexed cephalosporin (cefotaxime; 3). The structures imply that derivatives of LTV will be useful in the search for new antibiotics with activity against beta-lactam-resistant bacteria. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional characteristics of TauA binding protein from TauABC Escherichia coli system
Javaux, C.; Joris, Bernard ULg; De Witte, P.

in Protein Journal (2007), 26(4), 231-238

Although TauA shares few common characteristics with other known periplasmic binding protein, TauA is a putative periplasmic binding protein, part of tauABCD gene cluster involved in sulfonate transport ... [more ▼]

Although TauA shares few common characteristics with other known periplasmic binding protein, TauA is a putative periplasmic binding protein, part of tauABCD gene cluster involved in sulfonate transport in sulphate starvation condition. This protein was expressed in E. coli BL 21 and purified before to assess its binding functionalities. Measurement of K (d) value (mean 11.3 nM) by binding/dialysis studies revealed high affinity and specificity with taurine and also indicated that TauA possessed a unique binding site for its ligand. Comparisons with other periplasmic binding proteins suggests TauA plays a major role in ABC transport system and could be ideal candidate to serve as taurine catcher in biological fluids. [less ▲]

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See detailPREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes
Hiard, Samuel ULg; Marée, Raphaël ULg; Colson, Séverine ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2007), 357(4), 861-864

In the post-genomic area, the prediction of transcription factor regulons by position weight matrix-based programmes is a powerful approach to decipher biological pathways and to modelize regulatory ... [more ▼]

In the post-genomic area, the prediction of transcription factor regulons by position weight matrix-based programmes is a powerful approach to decipher biological pathways and to modelize regulatory networks in bacteria. The main difficulty once a regulon prediction is available is to estimate its reliability prior to start expensive experimental validations and therefore trying to find a way how to identify true positive hits from an endless list of potential target genes of a regulatory protein. Here we introduce PREDetector (Prokaryotic Regulatory Elements Detector), a tool developed for predicting regulons of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial genomes that, beside the automatic prediction, scoring and positioning of potential binding sites and their respective target genes in annotated bacterial genomes, it also provides an easy way to estimate the thresholds where to find reliable possible new target genes. PREDetector can be downloaded freely at http://www.montefiore.ulg.ac.be/-hiard/PreDetector (c) 2007 Published by Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detail1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of YajG, an Escherichia coli protein of unknown structure and function.
Boudet, Julien; Chouquet, Anne; Chahboune, Aicha et al

in Biomolecular NMR assignments (2007), 1(1), 89-91

The ampG gene codes for a permease required to uptake anhydro-muropeptides into bacterial cytoplasm. Located upstream in the same operon, is another 579-base-pair-long open reading frame encoding a ... [more ▼]

The ampG gene codes for a permease required to uptake anhydro-muropeptides into bacterial cytoplasm. Located upstream in the same operon, is another 579-base-pair-long open reading frame encoding a putative lipoprotein YajG, whose nearly complete 1H,13C,15N assignments are reported here. [less ▲]

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See detailSurfactin and fengycin lipopeptides of Bacillus subtilis as elicitors of induced systemic resistance in plants
Ongena, MARC ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Adam, Akram ULg et al

in Environmental Microbiology (2007), 9(4), 1084-1090

Multiple strains of Bacillus spp. were demonstrated to stimulate plant defence responses. However, very little is known about the nature of molecular determinants secreted by these Gram-positive bacteria ... [more ▼]

Multiple strains of Bacillus spp. were demonstrated to stimulate plant defence responses. However, very little is known about the nature of molecular determinants secreted by these Gram-positive bacteria that are responsible for the elicitation of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) phenomenon. This study shows that the lipopeptides surfactins and fengycins may be involved in this elicitation process. In bean, pure fengycins and surfactins provided a significant ISR-mediated protective effect on bean plants, similar to the one induced by living cells of the producing strain S499. Moreover, experiments conducted on bean and tomato plants showed that overexpression of both surfactin and fengycin biosynthetic genes in the naturally poor producer Bacillus subtilis strain 168 was associated with a significant increase in the potential of the derivatives to induce resistance. In tomato cells, key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway appeared to be activated in resistant plants following induction by lipopeptide overproducers. To our knowledge, such lipopeptides constitute a novel class of compounds from non-pathogenic bacteria that can be perceived by plant cells as signals to initiate defence mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailConformational and thermodynamic changes of the repressor/DNA operator complex upon monomerization shed new light an regulation mechanisms of bacterial resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics
Boudet, J.; Duval, V.; Van Melckebeke, H. et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2007), 35(13), 4384-4395

In absence of beta-lactam antibiotics, Blal and Mecl homodimeric repressors negatively control the expression of genes involved in P-lactam resistance in Bacillus licheniformis and in Staphylococcus ... [more ▼]

In absence of beta-lactam antibiotics, Blal and Mecl homodimeric repressors negatively control the expression of genes involved in P-lactam resistance in Bacillus licheniformis and in Staphylococcus aureus. Subsequently to P-lactam presence, Blal/Mecl is inactivated by a single-point proteolysis that separates its N-terminal DNA-binding domain to its C-terminal domain responsible for its dimerization. Concomitantly to this proteolysis, the truncated repressor acquires a low affinity for its DNA target that explains the expression of the structural gene for resistance. To understand the loss of the high DNA affinity of the truncated repressor, we have determined the different dissociation constants of the system and solved the solution structure of the B. licheniformis monomeric repressor complexed to the semi-operating sequence OP1, of blaP (1/20P(1)blaP) by using a de novo docking approach based on inter-molecular nuclear Overhauser effects and chemical-shift differences measured on each macromolecular partner. Although the N-terminal domain of the repressor is not subject to internal structural rearrangements upon DNA binding, the molecules adopt a tertiary conformation different from the crystallographic operator-repressor dimer complex, leading to a 300 rotation of the monomer with respect to a central axis extended across the DNA. These results open new insights for the repression and induction mechanisms of bacterial resistance to beta-lactams. [less ▲]

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See detailAdsorption Properties of the Penicillin Derivative DTPA on Gold Substrates
Dreesen, Laurent ULg; Silien, Christophe; Volcke, Cédric et al

in Chemphyschem : A European Journal of Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry (2007), 8(7), 1071-1076

Despite the large number of articles and patents dealing with penicillin and other b-lactam antibiotics, there have been no reports about the self-assembly of such substances as monolayers on gold ... [more ▼]

Despite the large number of articles and patents dealing with penicillin and other b-lactam antibiotics, there have been no reports about the self-assembly of such substances as monolayers on gold surfaces. The main reason stems from the high reactivity of the b-lactam ring, which hinders the development of molecules possessing this entity together with a metal-anchoring function. Herein, we present the synthesis of a novel molecule, 6-[(R,S)-5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoyl-amino]-penicillanic acid, which combines the b-lactam ring and a metal-anchoring group. Using spectroscopic tools, we demonstrate the chemisorption of this compound on gold as self-assembled monolayers without any alteration of the penicillin pharmacophore and document its reactivity towards a penicillin-binding protein, BlaR-CTD. Our work is a preliminary step towards the development of new biosensors and well-ordered protein arrays, both based on the high affinity of penicillin for penicillin-binding proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailThe sugar phosphotransferase system of Streptomyces coelicolor is regulated by the GntR-family regulator DasR and links N-acetylglucosamine metabolism to the control of development
Rigali, Sébastien ULg; Nothaft, H.; Noens, E. E. E. et al

in Molecular Microbiology (2006), 61(5), 1237-1251

Members of the soil-dwelling, sporulating prokaryotic genus Streptomyces are indispensable for the recycling of the most abundant polysaccharides on earth (cellulose and chitin), and produce a wide range ... [more ▼]

Members of the soil-dwelling, sporulating prokaryotic genus Streptomyces are indispensable for the recycling of the most abundant polysaccharides on earth (cellulose and chitin), and produce a wide range of antibiotics and industrial enzymes. How do these organisms sense the nutritional state of the environment, and what controls the signal for the switch to antibiotic production and morphological development? Here we show that high extracellular concentrations of N-acetylglucosamine, the monomer of chitin, prevent Streptomyces coelicolor progressing beyond the vegetative state, and that this effect is absent in a mutant defective of N-acetylglucosamine transport. We provide evidence that the signal is transmitted through the GntR-family regulator DasR, which controls the N-acetylglucosamine regulon, including the pts genes ptsH, ptsI and crr needed for uptake of N-acetylglucosamine. Deletion of dasR or the pts genes resulted in a bald phenotype. Binding of DasR to its target genes is abolished by glucosamine 6-phosphate, a central molecule in N-acetylglucosamine metabolism. Extracellular complementation experiments with many bld mutants showed that the dasR mutant is arrested at an early stage of the developmental programme, and does not fit in the previously described bld signalling cascade. Thus, for the first time we are able to directly link carbon (and nitrogen) metabolism to development, highlighting a novel type of metabolic regulator, which senses the nutritional state of the habitat, maintaining vegetative growth until changing circumstances trigger the switch to sporulation. Our work, and the model it suggests, provide new leads towards understanding how microorganisms time developmental commitment. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis of protected meso-diaminopimelic acid.
Teller, N.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2005, October 10)

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See detailSynthesis of anhydro-muranic acid derivatives as substrates for MurNAc amidase.
Mercier, F.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2005, October 10)

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See detailMembrane topology of the Escherichia coli AmpG permease required for recycling of cell wall anhydromuropeptides and AmpC beta-lactamase induction.
Chahboune, Aicha; Decaffmeyer, Marc; Brasseur, Robert ULg et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2005), 49(3), 1145-9

Escherichia coli, and presumably most other gram-negative bacteria, possesses an efficient protein machinery for recycling its peptidoglycan during cell growth. The major recycled peptidoglycan product is ... [more ▼]

Escherichia coli, and presumably most other gram-negative bacteria, possesses an efficient protein machinery for recycling its peptidoglycan during cell growth. The major recycled peptidoglycan product is N-acetylglucosamine-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid-tetrapeptide. Its uptake from the periplasm into the cytoplasm is carried out via the AmpG protein, an intrinsic membrane protein. In gram-negative bacteria carrying an ampC beta-lactamase-inducible gene on their chromosomes, the induction mechanism is directly linked to peptidoglycan recycling. After identification of the different putative hydrophobic segments by computing, the AmpG topology was experimentally determined by using beta-lactamase fusion. In the proposed model, AmpG contains 10 transmembrane segments and two large cytoplasmic loops. [less ▲]

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See detailBovine pepsinogen A: Isolation and parial characterization of isoforms with high activity
Idrissa-Sidikou, D.; Remy, B.; Gerardin-Otthiers, Nicole ULg et al

in Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances (2005)

The goal of this study was to purify bovine pepsinogen by a simple method allowing the preparation of large amount of pure protein. The purified protein and antisera are needed to develop diagnostic ... [more ▼]

The goal of this study was to purify bovine pepsinogen by a simple method allowing the preparation of large amount of pure protein. The purified protein and antisera are needed to develop diagnostic methods for further investigations in animals susceptible of gastric disorders or helminthosis. Pepsinogen isoforms were separated from extracts of bovine fundic mucosa by ammonium sulfate precipitations and chromatography on DEAE and hydroxyapatite. The isoforms showed a high activity in indirect proteolytic assay. Sequence analysis gave the following amino acid sequence SVVKIPLVKK for fraction 1, 2 and SVVKIPLVKKKSLRQNLIENGKLKE for fraction 3. The Mass spectrometry revealed isoforms with different masses from 39,864 to 40,181 Da. The estimated organic phosphate content ranged from 0.98 to 3.9 moles of phosphate per molecule. The protocol, with few steps, gave consequent quantities of pure and active protein available for further studies including the development of RIA and ELISA as diagnostic tools in gastrointestinal diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecificity inversion of Ochrobactrum anthropi D-aminopeptidase to a D,D-carboxypeptidase with new penicillin binding activity by directed mutagenesis
Delmarcelle, Michaël ULg; Boursoit, Marie-Caroline; Filée, Patrice ULg et al

in Protein Science : A Publication of the Protein Society (2005), 14

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See detailNew integrative method to generate Bacillus subtilis recombinant strains free of selection markers
Brans, Alain ULg; Filée, Patrice ULg; Chevigné, Andy ULg et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2004), 70(12), 7241-7250

The novel method described in this paper combines the use of blaI, which encodes a repressor involved in Bacillus licheniformis BlaP beta-lactamase regulation, an antibiotic resistance gene, and a B ... [more ▼]

The novel method described in this paper combines the use of blaI, which encodes a repressor involved in Bacillus licheniformis BlaP beta-lactamase regulation, an antibiotic resistance gene, and a B. subtilis strain (BS1541) that is conditionally auxotrophic for lysine. We constructed a BlaI cassette containing blaI and the spectinomycin resistance genes and two short direct repeat DNA sequences, one at each extremity of the cassette. The BS1541 strain was obtained by replacing the B. subtilis P(lysA) promoter with that of the P(blaP) beta-lactamase promoter. In the resulting strain, the cloning of the blaI repressor gene confers lysine auxotrophy to BS1541. After integration of the BlaI cassette into the chromosome of a conditionally lys-auxotrophic (BS1541) strain by homologous recombination and positive selection for spectinomycin resistance, the eviction of the BlaI cassette was achieved by single crossover between the two short direct repeat sequences. This strategy was successfully used to inactivate a single gene and to introduce a gene of interest in the Bacillus chromosome. In both cases the resulting strains are free of selection marker. This allows the use of the BlaI cassette to repeatedly further modify the Bacillus chromosome. [less ▲]

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See detailGuanidinium chloride denaturation of the dimeric Bacillus licheniformis Blal repressor highlights an independent domain unfolding pathway
Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Filée, Patrice ULg; Van Melckebeke, H. et al

in Biochemical Journal (2004), 384(Pt 1), 179-190

The Bacillus licheniformis 74911 BlaI repressor is a prokaryotic regulator that, in the absence of a P-lactam antibiotic, prevents the transcription of the blaP gene, which encodes the BlaP beta-lactamase ... [more ▼]

The Bacillus licheniformis 74911 BlaI repressor is a prokaryotic regulator that, in the absence of a P-lactam antibiotic, prevents the transcription of the blaP gene, which encodes the BlaP beta-lactamase. The BlaI repressor is composed of two structural domains. The 82-residue NTD (N-terminal domain) is a DNA-binding domain, and the CTD (C-terminal domain) containing the next 46 residues is a dimerization domain. Recent studies have shown the existence of the monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric forms of BlaI in solution. In the present study, we analyse the equilibrium unfolding of BlaI in the presence of GdmCl (guanidinium chloride) using different techniques: intrinsic and ANS (8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid) fluorescence, far- and near-UV CD spectroscopy, cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the intact NTD and CTD were purified after proteolysis of BlaI by papain, and their unfolding by GdmCl was also studied. GdmCl-induced equilibrium unfolding was shown to be fully reversible for BlaI and for the two isolated fragments. The results demonstrate that the NTD and CTD of BlaI fold/unfold independently in a four-step process, with no significant cooperative interactions between them. During the first step, the unfolding of the Blal CTD occurs, followed in the second step by the formation of an 'ANS-bound' intermediate state. Crosslinking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments suggest that the dissociation of the dimer into two partially unfolded monomers takes place in the third step. Finally, the unfolding of the Blal NTD occurs at a GdmCI concentration of approx. 4 M. In summary, it is shown that the Blal CTD is structured, more flexible and less stable than the NTD upon GdmCI denaturation. These results contribute to the characterization of the Blal dimerization domain (i.e. CTD) involved in the induction process. [less ▲]

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See detailExtending the classification of bacterial transcription factors beyond the helix-turn-helix motif as an alternative approach to discover new cis/trans relationships
Rigali, Sébastien ULg; Schlicht, M.; Hoskisson, P. et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2004), 32(11), 3418-3426

Transcription factors (TFs) of bacterial helix-turn-helix superfamilies exhibit different effector-binding domains (EBDs) fused to a DNA-binding domain with a common feature. In a previous study of the ... [more ▼]

Transcription factors (TFs) of bacterial helix-turn-helix superfamilies exhibit different effector-binding domains (EBDs) fused to a DNA-binding domain with a common feature. In a previous study of the GntR superfamily, we demonstrated that classifying members into subfamilies according to the EBD heterogeneity highlighted unsuspected and accurate TF-binding site signatures. In this work, we present how such in silico analysis can provide prediction tools to discover new cis/trans relationships. The TF-binding site consensus of the HutC/GntR subfamily was used to (i) predict target sites within the Streptomyces coelicolor genome, (ii) discover a new HutC/GntR regulon and (iii) discover its specific TF. By scanning the S.coelicolor genome we identified a presumed new HutC regulon that comprises genes of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) specific for the uptake of N-acetylglucosamine (PTSNag). A weight matrix was derived from the compilation of the predicted cis-acting elements upstream of each gene of the presumed regulon. Under the assumption that TFs are often subject to autoregulation, we used this matrix to scan the upstream region of the 24 HutC-like members of S.coelicolor. orf SCO5231 (dasR) was selected as the best candidate according to the high score of a 16 bp sequence identified in its upstream region. Our prediction that DasR regulates the PTSNag regulon was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro experiments. In conclusion, our in silico approach permitted to highlight the specific TF of a regulon out of the 673 orfs annotated as 'regulatory proteins' within the genome of S.coelicolor. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of an intramolecular interaction between the two domains of the BlaR1 penicillin receptor during the signal transduction
Hanique, Sophie; Colombo, Maria-Luigi; Goormaghtigh, Erik et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(14), 14264-14272

The BlaR1 protein is a penicillin-sensory transducer involved in the induction of the Bacillus licheniformis beta-lactamase. The amino-terminal domain of the protein exhibits four transmembrane segments ... [more ▼]

The BlaR1 protein is a penicillin-sensory transducer involved in the induction of the Bacillus licheniformis beta-lactamase. The amino-terminal domain of the protein exhibits four transmembrane segments (TM1-TM4) that form a four-alpha-helix bundle embedded in the plasma bilayer. The carboxyl-terminal domain of 250 amino acids (BlaR-CTD) fused at the carboxyl end of TM4 possesses the amino acid sequence signature of penicillin-binding proteins. This membrane topology suggests that BlaR-CTD and the BlaR-amino-terminal domain are responsible for signal reception and signal transduction, respectively. With the use of phage display experiments, we highlight herein an interaction between BlaR-CTD and the extracellular, 63-amino acid L2 loop connecting TM2 and TM3. This interaction does not occur in the presence of penicillin. This result suggests that binding of the antibiotic to BlaR1 might entail the release of the interaction between L2 and BlaR-CTD, causing a motion of the alpha-helix bundle and transfer of the information to the cytoplasm of the cell. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD, and Fourier transform IR spectroscopy experiments indicate that in contrast to the behavior of the corresponding Staphylococcus aureus protein, the beta-lactam antibiotic does not induce a drastic conformational change in B. licheniformis BlaR-CTD. [less ▲]

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