References of "Jijakli, Haissam"
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See detailNovel applications of lactoperoxydase system against pathogens of cultivated plants
Jijakli, Haissam ULg; Bafort, Françoise ULg; perraudin, J.P

Conference (2010, June)

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See detailLa lutte biologique et les terrains de sport et des espaces verts
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2010, January)

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See detailLe developpement des methodes de lutte biologique en agriculture et horticulture
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2010, January)

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See detailCrown rot of banana: Preharvest factors involved in postharvest disease development and integrated control methods
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg; Chillet, M. et al

in Plant Disease (2010), 94(6), 648-658

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See detailHand position on the bunch and source-sink ratio influence the banana fruit susceptibility to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Bastiaanse, H.; Chillet, M. et al

in Annals of Applied Biology (2010), 156

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was ... [more ▼]

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was suggested that this depends on environmental preharvest factors. However, little is known about the preharvest factors influencing this susceptibility. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extent to which fruit filling characteristics during growth and the fruit development stage influence the banana susceptibility to crown rot. This involved evaluating the influence of (a) the fruit position at different levels of the banana bunch (hands) and (b) changing the source–sink ratio (So–Si ratio), on the fruit susceptibility to crown rot. The fruit susceptibility was determined by measuring the internal necrotic surface (INS) after artificial inoculation of Colletotrichum musae. A linear correlation (r = −0.95) was found between the hand position on the bunch and the INS. The So–Si ratio was found to influence the pomological characteristics of the fruits and their susceptibility to crown rot. Fruits of bunches from which six hands were removed (two hands remaining on the bunch) proved to be significantly less susceptible to crown rot (INS = 138.3 mm2) than those from bunches with eight hands (INS = 237.9 mm2). The banana susceptibility to crown rot is thus likely to be influenced by the fruit development stage and filling characteristics. The present results highlight the importance of standardising hand sampling on a bunch when testing fruit susceptibility to crown rot. They also show that hand removal in the field has advantages in the context of integrated pest management, making it possible to reduce fruit susceptibility to crown rot while increasing fruit size. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of three essential oils as potential source of botanical fungicide
Kouassi, Kouadio Hugues Sosthène ULg; Bajji, M.; Zhiri, A. et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailProduction and partial characterization of chitinase from a halotolerant Planococcus rifitoensis strain M2-26
Essghaier, Badiaa; Rouaissi, Mustapha; Boudabous, Abdellatif et al

in World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology (2010), 26(6), 977-984

This paper is the first to investigate the production and partial characterization of the chitinase enzyme from a moderately halophilic bacterium Planococcus rifitoensis strain M2-26, earlier isolated ... [more ▼]

This paper is the first to investigate the production and partial characterization of the chitinase enzyme from a moderately halophilic bacterium Planococcus rifitoensis strain M2-26, earlier isolated from a shallow salt lake in Tunisia. The impact of salt, salinity concentration, pH, carbon and nitrogen sources on chitinase production and activity have been determined. This is the first report on a high salt-tolerant chitinase from P. rifitoensis, since it was active at high salinity (from 5 to 30% NaCl) as well as in the absence of salt. This enzyme showed optimal activity at 70 C and retained up to 82 and 66% of its original activity at 80 or 90 C, respectively. The activity of the enzyme was also shown over a wide pH range (from 5 to 11). For characterization of the enzyme activity, the chitinase secreted in the culture supernatant was partially purified. The preliminary study of the concentrated dialysed supernatant on native PAGE showed at least three chitinases produced by strain M2-26, with highest activity approximately at 65 kDa. Thus, the thermo-tolerant and high salt-tolerant chitinases produced by P. rifitoensis strain M2-26 could be useful for application in diverse areas such as biotechnology and agro-industry. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated control of crown rot of banana with Candida oleophila strain O, calcium chloride and modified atmosphere packaging
Bastiaanse, H.; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lassois, Ludivine ULg et al

in Biological Control (2010), 53

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See detailPlant-RNA viroid relationship: a complex host pathogen interaction
Parisi, Olivier ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(3),

Viroids are non encapsidated small RNA plant pathogens unable to produce any protein. They are able to infect dramatically a broad range of plants including herbaceous and tree crops. The ways by which ... [more ▼]

Viroids are non encapsidated small RNA plant pathogens unable to produce any protein. They are able to infect dramatically a broad range of plants including herbaceous and tree crops. The ways by which viroids are able to induce diseases are actually unknown. However, recent studies have shown that viroids are able to regulate the gene expression of their hosts, they can modify the host-protein phosphorylation sensibility and they interact with host-protein implicated RNA trafficking and protein phosphorylation. Moreover during their evolution plants have developed a mechanism able to regulate their gene expression and to degrade exogenous RNAs like viroids: the gene silencing. Unfortunately, this pathway seems, now, also highly implicated in the symptoms development. This review describes studies that are realized since a few years to increase the knowledge about the plant-viroid relationship. [less ▲]

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See detailprésentation des travaux de recherche en lutte biologique
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2009, June)

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See detailEvaluation of two protein extraction protocols for Pichia anomala proteome analysis.
Bajji, Mohammed; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Mauro, Sergio et al

Poster (2009, May 19)

Pichia anomala (strain Kh6) was isolated from the surface of apple fruits and selected for its high and reliable biocontrol activity against Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum. Its main modes of ... [more ▼]

Pichia anomala (strain Kh6) was isolated from the surface of apple fruits and selected for its high and reliable biocontrol activity against Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum. Its main modes of action have until now been studied using essentially microbiological and molecular approaches. The study continues now using the proteomic approach and considering the in situ P. anomala/B. cinerea/apple interaction. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) is one of the most powerful tools used for proteomic analysis. It combines two sequential separation steps, the first dimension via isoelectric focusing (IEF) and the second one by SDS PAGE. Although recent advances in 2-D PAGE, the extraction of the whole proteome and the removal of interfering contaminants still limit its application. Sample preparation constitutes indeed a critical influential step for IEF which in turn affects 2-D gel quality. The objective of the present work was thus to develop an effective protein extraction protocol designed for 2-D PAGE analysis of the proteome of P. anomala strain Kh6. As a starting point, two contrasting protein extraction protocols were chosen to be evaluated in terms of protein yield and one-dimensional (1-D) SDS PAGE and 2-D PAGE gel patterns. The first protocol uses a urea/thiourea-based lysis buffer whereas the second protocol utilizes a hot SDS-based lysis buffer with an additional precipitation step. The comparison model used consisted of apples treated with strain Kh6 alone (K) and apples first treated with Kh6 and then inoculated with B. cinerea conidia (KB). Growth kinetics of strain Kh6 on wounded apples was determined and found to be not affected by the presence of B. cinerea conidia. Proteins were extracted from yeast pellets collected at both the exponential and stationary phases of strain Kh6 growth on apples. The evaluation of both extraction protocols indicates that more proteins were extracted with the SDS protocol and, according to 1-D assays, higher molecular weight proteins were obtained with the ‘urea/thiourea’ protocol and, regardless of the protocol used, more bands were obtained during the exponential phase. 2-D assays are currently underway and the corresponding results will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailPourquoi n'y a-t-il pas plus de biopesticides sur le marché?
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Scientific conference (2009, January)

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See detailles défis de la recherche en lutte biologique contre les maladies des fruits récoltés
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Scientific conference (2009, January)

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See detailHigh salt-tolerant protease from a potential biocontrol agent bacillus pumilus M3-16
Essghaier, Badiaa; Bajji, Mohammed; Jijakli, Haissam ULg et al

in Annals of Microbiology (2009), 59(3), 553-558

In this paper, we investigate the characterization and evaluation of the antifungal protease activity from a halotolerant strain M3-16 of Bacillus pumilus, earlier isolated from a shallow salt lake in ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate the characterization and evaluation of the antifungal protease activity from a halotolerant strain M3-16 of Bacillus pumilus, earlier isolated from a shallow salt lake in Tunisia. Protease enzyme was highly induced by the pathogen tested in vitro (27.4 U/ml). This is the first report on high salt-tolerant protease from B. pumilus, since it was active at high salinity (from 5 to 30% NaCl, w/v) as well as in the absence of salinity. This enzyme showed optimal activity at 60 °C and pH 8. At 80 °C and 30 min, the enzyme retained up to 91% and it showed stability over a wide pH range (from pH 5 to 11). The enzyme was found to be monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 31 kDa. The amino acid sequence showed high similarity (94%) to ATP-dependent protease from B. pumilus strain ATCC 7061. Thus, our alkaline thermostable and high salt-tolerant protease induced by a phytopathogenic fungus, could be useful for application in diverse areas such as biotechnology alimentary and agronomy industries. [less ▲]

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See detailA Simple And Rapid Protocol Of Crude Dna Extraction From Apple Trees For Pcr And Real-Time Pcr Detection Of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma Mali'
Aldaghi, M.; Massart, Sébastien ULg; Dutrecq, O. et al

in Journal of Virological Methods (2009), 156(1-2), 96-101

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See detailBiological control of grey mould in strawberry fruits by halophilic bacteria
Essghaier, Badiaa; Fardeau, ML; Cayol, JL et al

in Journal of Applied Microbiology (2009), 106(3), 833-846

Aims: Grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea is an economically important disease of strawberries in Tunisia and worldwide. The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from ... [more ▼]

Aims: Grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea is an economically important disease of strawberries in Tunisia and worldwide. The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from hypersaline ecosystems and evaluate the abilities of antifungal bacteria to secrete extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, anti- Botrytis metabolites and volatiles. Methods and Results: Grey mould was reduced in strawberry fruits treated with halophilic antagonists and artificially inoculated with B. cinerea. Thirty strains (20Æ2%) were active against the pathogen and reduced the percentage of fruits infected after 3 days of storage at 20 C, from 50% to 91Æ66%. The antagonists were characterized by phenotypic tests and 16S rDNA sequencing. They were identified as belonging to one of the species: Virgibacillus marismortui, B. subtilis, B. pumilus, B. licheniformis, Terribacillus halophilus, Halomonas elongata, Planococcus rifietoensis, Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus sp. The effective isolates were tested for antifungal secondary metabolites. Conclusions: Moderately halophilic bacteria may be useful in biological control against this pathogen during postharvest storage of strawberries. Significance and Impact of the study: The use of such bacteria may constitute an important alternative to synthetic fungicides. These moderate halophiles can be exploited in commercial production and application of the effective strains under storage and greenhouse conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment Of Pichia Anomala (Strain K) Efficacy Against Blue Mould Of Apples When Applied Pre- Or Post-Harvest Under Laboratory Conditions And In Orchard Trials
Lahlali, R.; Massart, Sébastien ULg; De Clercq, D. et al

in European Journal of Plant Pathology (2009), 123(1), 37-45

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (3 ULg)