References of "Jerusalem, Guy"
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See detailPazopanib (Votrient) dans le traitement du cancer du rein et des sarcomes des tissus mous.
GENNIGENS, Christine ULg; JERUSALEM, Guy ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 67(7-8), 437-42

Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all malignant tumors. Until a few years ago, immunotherapy (Interferon and/or Interleukin-2) was the only approved systemic treatment in the metastatic setting ... [more ▼]

Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all malignant tumors. Until a few years ago, immunotherapy (Interferon and/or Interleukin-2) was the only approved systemic treatment in the metastatic setting. Better knowledge of renal cell cancer biology drew attention on the fundamental role of angiogenesis. Several strategies targeting angiogenesis have been developed including VEGF and VEGFR inhibitors. They are now the standard treatment in first and second line. Pazopanib, a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is one of the treatment options recommended for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, in first line and after cytokines failure. Since more recently, pazopanib is also approved in the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, after failure of at least one line of chemoterapy. In this paper, we will review the mechanism of action and the clinical results of pazopanib in renal cell carcinoma and sarcoma. [less ▲]

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See detailLes traitements cibles remplaceront-ils la chimiotherapie?
COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; JERUSALEM, Guy ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 67 Spec No

The oncologist dream is to provide more benefit with lower toxicity. The increasing knowledge of molecular mechanism for survival and proliferation of cancer cells leads to the development of targeted ... [more ▼]

The oncologist dream is to provide more benefit with lower toxicity. The increasing knowledge of molecular mechanism for survival and proliferation of cancer cells leads to the development of targeted therapies with impressive results for some cancers even if not associated with chemotherapy. These targeted treatments could be monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Inactivation of only one oncogene can lead to the regression of tumours as well as the inhibition of only one pathway with one or more inhibitors. This result is related to the oncogenic addiction of these tumours. Examples are imatinib in CML and GIST, trastuzumab in HER2 positive breast cancer, gefitinib in mutated EGFR, crizotinib in EML4-ALK positive lung cancer and, also, vemurafenib in BRAF 600E mutated metastatic melanoma. We shall specifically discuss HER2 positive breast cancer, which represent some 15-20% of breast cancers and the recent targeted and bi-targeted therapies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody has changed the prognosis of the disease improving survival in the metastatic and adjuvant setting. Lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of EGFR and HER2 is approved with capecitabine in trastuzumab resistant patients and in combination with letrozole in first line. Unfortunately, 20% of patients receiving adjuvant trastuzumab relapse and metastatic patients only transienly respond to trastuzumab or lapatinib combined with chemotherapy. New HER2 targeted drugs are currently in development like pertuzumab, T-DMI or mTOR and PI3K inhibitors. New strategies combining these drugs with or without chemotherapy showed interesting results in metastatic and neoadjuvant trials. The selection of patients who will most benefit from these combinations is still a challenge. Currently, chemotherapy in association with anti-HER2 therapy remains the most effective treatment option. [less ▲]

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See detailImmediate Administration of Zoledronic Acid Reduces Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women With Early Breast Cancer: 12-month analysis of the E-ZO-FAST trial.
Llombart, Antonio; Frassoldati, Antonio; Paija, Outi et al

in Clinical Breast Cancer (2012), 12(1), 40-8

BACKGROUND: Letrozole is a proven and effective adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) early breast cancer (EBC). As with other aromatase inhibitors (AIs), long ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Letrozole is a proven and effective adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) early breast cancer (EBC). As with other aromatase inhibitors (AIs), long-term letrozole administration is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. This study compared potential bone-protecting effects of immediate vs. delayed administration of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in patients with EBC receiving adjuvant letrozole. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HR(+) EBC in whom adjuvant letrozole treatment was initiated (2.5 mg/day for 5 years) were randomized to immediate ZOL treatment (immediate ZOL) or delayed ZOL treatment (delayed ZOL) (both at 4 mg every 6 months). Patients in the delayed ZOL group received ZOL only for a BMD T-score that decreased to < -2.0 (lumbar spine [LS] or total hip [TH]) or for fracture. The primary endpoint was percentage change in the LS BMD at month 12. Patients were stratified by established or recent postmenopausal status, baseline T-scores, and adjuvant chemotherapy history. RESULTS: At 12 months, the LS BMD increased in the immediate ZOL group (+2.72%) but decreased in the delayed ZOL group (-2.71%); the absolute difference between groups was significant (5.43%; P < .0001). Across all subgroups, patients receiving immediate ZOL had significantly increased LS and TH BMD vs. those who received delayed ZOL (P < .0001). Differences in fracture incidence or disease recurrence could not be ascertained because of early data cutoff and low incidence of events. Adverse events were generally mild, transient, and consistent with the known safety profiles of both agents. CONCLUSION: Immediate ZOL administration effectively prevented BMD loss and increased BMD in postmenopausal women with HR(+) EBC receiving adjuvant letrozole, regardless of BMD status at baseline. [less ▲]

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See detailExtended Benefit from Sequential Administration of Docetaxel after Standard Fluorouracil, Epirubicin, and Cyclophosphamide Regimen for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: The 8-Year Follow-Up Results of the UNICANCER-PACS01 Trial.
Coudert, Bruno; Asselain, Bernard; Campone, Mario et al

in Oncologist (2012), 17(7), 900-909

Purpose. The initial report from the Programme Action Concertee Sein (PACS) PACS01 trial demonstrated a benefit at 5 years for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates with the ... [more ▼]

Purpose. The initial report from the Programme Action Concertee Sein (PACS) PACS01 trial demonstrated a benefit at 5 years for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates with the sequential administration of docetaxel after FEC100 (fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 100 mg/m(2), and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2)) for patients with node-positive, operable breast cancer. We evaluate here the impact of this regimen at 8 years. Patients and Methods. Between June 1997 and March 2000, a total of 1,999 patients (age <65) with localized, resectable, non-pretreated, unilateral breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either standard FEC100 for 6 cycles or 3 cycles of FEC100 followed by 3 cycles of 100 mg/m(2) docetaxel (FEC-D), both given every 21 days. Radiotherapy was mandatory after conservative surgery and tamoxifen was given for 5 years to hormone receptor (HR)-positive patients. Five-year DFS was the trial's main endpoint. Updated 8-year survival data are presented. Results. With a median follow-up of 92.8 months, 639 patients experienced at least one event. A total number of 383 deaths were registered. Eight-year DFS rates were 65.8% with FEC alone and 70.2% with FEC-D. OS rates at 8 years were 78% with FEC alone and 83.2% with FEC-D. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age and number of positive nodes showed a 15% reduction in the relative risk of relapse and a 25% reduction in the relative risk of death in favor of FEC-D. Significant relative risk reductions were observed in the HR-positive, HER2-positive, and Ki67 >/=20% subpopulations. Conclusion. Benefits for DFS and OS rates with the sequential FEC-D regimen are fully confirmed at 8 years. [less ▲]

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See detailPhase I trial of oral mTOR inhibitor everolimus in combination with trastuzumab and vinorelbine in pre-treated patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Fasolo, Angelica; Dieras, Véronique et al

in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (2011), 125(2), 447-455

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See detailAccelerated partial breast irradiation: state of the art
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; JANSEN, Nicolas ULg; JANVARY, Zsolt Levente ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Medical Oncology [=BJMO] (2011), 5(1), 3-7

Accelerated partial breast irradiation can be applied by means of different techniques. It <br />offers an opportunity for reducing the treatment duration considerably and harbours the <br />potential for ... [more ▼]

Accelerated partial breast irradiation can be applied by means of different techniques. It <br />offers an opportunity for reducing the treatment duration considerably and harbours the <br />potential for less exposure of healthy tissue to higher radiation doses. However, evidence <br />issued from randomized trials is limited. European and American experts call our attention <br />to the potential dangers of widespread implementation of these techniques without any <br />long-term data on outcome and ask for complete information of patients on the potential <br />hazards and risks if accelerated partial breast irradiation is used instead of whole breast <br />irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailFinal results of NKTR-102, a topoisomerase I inhibitor-polymer conjugate, in patients (Pts) with pretreated metastatic breast cancer (MBC) demonstrating significant antitumor activity
Garcia, A; Awada, A; Chan, S et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2011), 29(supplement 27),

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See detailTrabectedine (ET-743/Yondelis) dans le traitement des sarcomes des tissus mous et du cancer de l'ovaire.
GENNIGENS, Christine ULg; Jerusalem, Guy ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(7-8), 452-5

Soft tissue sarcomas account for 1% of all malignant tumours. Until a few years ago, doxorubicine and ifosfamide were the only active chemotherapy drugs in the metastatic setting. Recently, a new drug has ... [more ▼]

Soft tissue sarcomas account for 1% of all malignant tumours. Until a few years ago, doxorubicine and ifosfamide were the only active chemotherapy drugs in the metastatic setting. Recently, a new drug has proven its efficacy after failure of standard treatments: the trabectedin; its activity is based on interference with ADN repair mechanisms. Trabectedin has just been also validated and reimbursed in patients with ovarian cancer, in partially sensitive recurrence. In this paper, we will review the mechanism of action and the clinical results of trabectedin. [less ▲]

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See detailA propos d'un cas de rechute tardive de cancer du sein après traitement adjuvant
LOUSBERG, Laurence; SOMJA, Joan ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 306-310

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See detailEditorial. Le cancer du sein.
JERUSALEM, Guy ULg; SCHEEN, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 225-228

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See detail18F-fluoride PET/CT for assessing bone involvement in prostate and breast cancers
Withofs, Nadia ULg; Grayet, Benjamin ULg; Tancredi, Tino ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2011), 32(3), 168-176

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See detailCellules Tumorales Circulantes : détection, caractérisation et intérêts cliniques
Gilles, Christine ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 279-84

The metastatic process generates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow and other organs which can remain as occult metastases. Various methods and systems have ... [more ▼]

The metastatic process generates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow and other organs which can remain as occult metastases. Various methods and systems have been developed to allow the isolation and identification of those cells but major technical limitations still exist. Research on CTCs is a nevertheless tremendously growing field of cancer research because of their potential clinical applications. CTCs indeed convey predictive information for the development of metastasis and recurrence, and prognostic information regarding patient survival. CTCs enumeration could also be used to monitor the effectiveness of adjuvant treatments. Moreover, enhancing our basic understanding of the metastatic process, CTCs, and DTCs in particular, are thought to contain subpopulations of cells with stem cells properties that would be responsible for relapses. [less ▲]

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See detailApport de la consultation oncologique multidisciplinaire dans le choix des options thérapeutiques
JERUSALEM, Guy ULg; COUCKE, Philippe ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 311-314

Le diagnostic et la prise en charge thérapeutique du cancer deviennent extrêmement complexes. La concertation oncologique multidisciplinaire (COM) permet d’optimiser la prise en charge du patient atteint ... [more ▼]

Le diagnostic et la prise en charge thérapeutique du cancer deviennent extrêmement complexes. La concertation oncologique multidisciplinaire (COM) permet d’optimiser la prise en charge du patient atteint de cancer. La COM permet de confronter les différents points de vue de chaque intervenant afin que le plan thérapeutique soit réellement l’approche la plus prometteuse et rationnelle pour traiter le cancer et, dans un contexte de maladie incurable, pour favoriser au mieux la qualité de vie. Cependant, le patient a toujours le dernier mot. Il peut évidemment refuser pour des raisons personnelles le traitement optimal. [less ▲]

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See detailLe cancer du sein de la femme âgée
MARTIN, Marie; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; RORIVE, Andrée ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 400-408

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See detailCancer du sein et métastases cérébrales
RORIVE, Andrée ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; MARTIN, Marie et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 299-305

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See detailLe cancer du sein chez la femme jeune
ANDRE, Chantal ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; RORIVE, Andrée ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 397-399

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See detailAspects moléculaires du cancer du sein triple négatif et les implications thérapeutiques
COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 393-396

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