References of "Jehin, Emmanuel"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDust from Comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 Return: Parent Body of a New Meteor Shower, the May Camelopardalids
Ishiguro, Masateru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hanayama, Hidekazu et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2015), 798

We report a new observation of the Jupiter family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was ... [more ▼]

We report a new observation of the Jupiter family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was apparently inactive at a heliocentric distance r<SUB>h</SUB> = 1.6 AU and showed weak activity at r<SUB>h</SUB> <= 1.4 AU. We found an active region of <0.001% of the entire nuclear surface during the comet's dormant phase. An edge-on image suggests that particles up to 1 cm in size (with an uncertainty of factor 3-5) were ejected following a differential power-law size distribution with index q = –3.25 ± 0.10. We derived a mass-loss rate of 2-10 kg s<SUP>–1</SUP> during the active phase and a total mass of ≈5 × 10<SUP>7</SUP> kg during the 2014 return. The ejection terminal velocity of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles was 1-4 m s<SUP>–1</SUP>, which is comparable to the escape velocity from the nucleus (1.4 m s<SUP>–1</SUP>). These results imply that such large meteoric particles marginally escaped from the highly dormant comet nucleus via the gas drag force only within a few months of the perihelion passage. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailForbidden oxygen lines at various nucleocentric distances in comets
Decock, Alice ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Rousselot, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2015), 573

Aims: We study the formation of the [OI] lines - that is, 5577.339 Å (the green line), 6300.304 Å and 6363.776 Å (the two red lines) - in the coma of comets and determine the parent species of the oxygen ... [more ▼]

Aims: We study the formation of the [OI] lines - that is, 5577.339 Å (the green line), 6300.304 Å and 6363.776 Å (the two red lines) - in the coma of comets and determine the parent species of the oxygen atoms using the ratio of the green-to-red-doublet emission intensity, I[SUB]5577[/SUB]/(I[SUB]6300[/SUB] + I[SUB]6364[/SUB]), (hereafter the G/R ratio) and the line velocity widths. <BR /> Methods: We acquired high-resolution spectroscopic observations at the ESO Very Large Telescope of comets C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), 73P-C/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, 8P/Tuttle, and 103P/Hartley 2 when they were close to Earth (<0.6 au). Using the observed spectra, which have a high spatial resolution (<60 km/pixel), we determined the intensities and widths of the three [OI] lines. We spatially extracted the spectra to achieve the best possible resolution of about 1-2'', that is, nucleocentric projected distances of 100 to 400 km depending on the geocentric distance of the comet. We decontaminated the [OI] green line from C[SUB]2[/SUB] lines blends that we identified. <BR /> Results: The observed G/R ratio in all four comets varies as a function of nucleocentric projected distance (between ~0.25 to ~0.05 within 1000 km). This is mainly due to the collisional quenching of O([SUP]1[/SUP]S) and O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) by water molecules in the inner coma. The observed green emission line width is about 2.5 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] and decreases as the distance from the nucleus increases, which can be explained by the varying contribution of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] to the O([SUP]1[/SUP]S) production in the innermost coma. The photodissociation of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] molecules seem to produce O([SUP]1[/SUP]S) closer to the nucleus, while the water molecule forms all the O([SUP]1[/SUP]S) and O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) atoms beyond 10[SUP]3[/SUP] km. Thus we conclude that the main parent species producing O([SUP]1[/SUP]S) and O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) in the inner coma is not always the same. The observations have been interpreted in the framework of the previously described coupled-chemistry-emission model, and the upper limits of the relative abundances of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] were derived from the observed G/R ratios. Measuring the [OI] lines might provide a new way to determine the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] relative abundance in comets. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programs ID 073.C-0525, 277.C-5016, 080.C-0615 and 086.C-0958.Tables 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201424403/olm">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvidence that Pluto's atmosphere does not collapse from occultations including the 2013 May 04 event
Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Borncamp, D. et al

in Icarus (2015), 246

Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013, and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we find the preferred models are consistent ... [more ▼]

Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013, and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we find the preferred models are consistent with Pluto retaining a collisional atmosphere throughout its 248-year orbit. The occultation results show an increasing atmospheric pressure with time in the current epoch, a trend present only in models with a high thermal inertia and a permanent N<SUB>2</SUB> ice cap at Pluto's north rotational pole. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDiscovery of WASP-85Ab: a hot Jupiter in a visual binary system
Brown, D. J. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J. et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We report the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter exoplanet WASP-85Ab. Using a combined analysis of spectroscopic and photometric data, we determine that the planet orbits its host star every 2.66 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter exoplanet WASP-85Ab. Using a combined analysis of spectroscopic and photometric data, we determine that the planet orbits its host star every 2.66 days, and has a mass of 1.09+/-0.03 M_Jup and a radius of 1.44+/-0.02 R_Jup. The host star is of G5 spectral type, with magnitude V=11.2, and lies 125+/-80 pc distant. We find stellar parameters of T_eff=5685+/-65 K, super-solar metallicity ([Fe/H]=0.08+/-0.10), M_star=1.04+/-0.07 M_sun and R_star=0.96+/-0.13 R_sun. The system has a K-dwarf binary companion, WASP-85B, at a separation of approximately 1.5". The close proximity of this companion leads to contamination of our photometry, decreasing the apparent transit depth that we account for during our analysis. Without this correction, we find the depth to be 50 percent smaller, the stellar density to be 32 percent smaller, and the planet radius to be 18 percent smaller than the true value. Many of our radial velocity observations are also contaminated; these are disregarded when analysing the system in favour of the uncontaminated HARPS observations, as they have reduced semi-amplitudes that lead to underestimated planetary masses. We find a long-term trend in the binary position angle, indicating a misalignment between the binary and orbital planes. WASP observations of the system show variability with a period of 14.64 days, indicative of rotational modulation caused by stellar activity. Analysis of the Ca ii H+K lines shows strong emission that implies that both binary components are strongly active. We find that the system is likely to be less than a few Gyr old. WASP-85 lies in the field of view of K2 Campaign 1. Long cadence observations of the planet clearly show the planetary transits, along with the signature of stellar variability. Analysis of the K2 data, both long and short cadence, is ongoing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWASP-94 A and B planets: hot-Jupiter cousins in a twin-star system
Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014), 572

We report the discovery of two hot-Jupiter planets, each orbiting one of the stars of a wide binary system. <ASTROBJ>WASP-94A</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>2MASS 20550794-3408079</ASTROBJ>) is an F8 type star ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two hot-Jupiter planets, each orbiting one of the stars of a wide binary system. <ASTROBJ>WASP-94A</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>2MASS 20550794-3408079</ASTROBJ>) is an F8 type star hosting a transiting planet with a radius of 1.72 ± 0.06 R<SUB>Jup</SUB>, a mass of 0.452 ± 0.034 M<SUB>Jup</SUB>, and an orbital period of 3.95 days. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect is clearly detected, and the measured projected spin-orbit angle indicates that the planet occupies a retrograde orbit. <ASTROBJ>WASP-94B</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>2MASS 20550915-3408078</ASTROBJ>) is an F9 stellar companion at an angular separation of 15'' (projected separation 2700 au), hosting a gas giant with a minimum mass of 0.618 ± 0.028 M<SUB>Jup</SUB> with a period of 2.008 days, detected by Doppler measurements. The orbital planes of the two planets are inclined relative to each other, indicating that at least one of them is inclined relative to the plane of the stellar binary. These hot Jupiters in a binary system bring new insights into the formation of close-in giant planets and the role of stellar multiplicity. The radial-velocity and photometric data used for this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A49">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A49</A> [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThree sub-Jupiter-mass planets: WASP-69b & WASP-84b transit active K dwarfs and WASP-70Ab transits the evolved primary of a G4+K3 binary
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, Laetitia ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2014), 445(2),

We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star (V ˜ 10). WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 MJup, 1.06 RJup) in a 3 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star (V ˜ 10). WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 MJup, 1.06 RJup) in a 3.868-d period around an active, ˜1-Gyr, mid-K dwarf. ROSAT detected X-rays 60±27 arcsec from WASP-69. If the star is the source then the planet could be undergoing mass-loss at a rate of ˜1012 g s-1. This is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the evaporation rate estimated for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which have exhibited anomalously large Lyman alpha absorption during transit. WASP-70Ab is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.59 MJup, 1.16 RJup) in a 3.713-d orbit around the primary of a spatially resolved, 9-10-Gyr, G4+K3 binary, with a separation of 3.3 arcsec (>=800 au). WASP-84b is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.69 MJup, 0.94 RJup) in an 8.523-d orbit around an active, ˜1-Gyr, early-K dwarf. Of the transiting planets discovered from the ground to date, WASP-84b has the third-longest period. For the active stars WASP-69 and WASP-84, we pre-whitened the radial velocities using a low-order harmonic series. We found that this reduced the residual scatter more than did the oft-used method of pre-whitening with a fit between residual radial velocity and bisector span. The system parameters were essentially unaffected by pre-whitening. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHigh-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope
Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2014, November 01), 46

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C ... [more ▼]

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON). </PRE></BODY></HTML> [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInstrumental methods for professional and amateur collaborations in planetary astronomy
Mousis, O.; Hueso, R.; Beaulieu, J.-P. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014), 38

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which ... [more ▼]

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers are effective and regularly lead to scientific publications.We discuss the instruments, detectors, software and methodologies typically used by amateur astronomers to collect the scientific data in the different domains of interest. Amateur contributions to the monitoring of planets and interplanetary matter, characterization of asteroids and comets, as well as the determination of the physical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects and exoplanets are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe TRAPPIST comet survey in 2014
Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2014, November 01), 46

TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is ... [more ▼]

TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is devoted to the detection and characterisation of exoplanets and to the study of comets and other small bodies in the Solar System. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins filters. We describe here the hardware and the goals of the project. For relatively bright comets (V < 12) we measure several times a week the gaseous production rates (using a Haser model) and the spatial distribution of several species among which OH, NH, CN, C2 and C3 as well as ions like CO+. The dust production rates (Afrho) and color of the dust aredetermined through four dust continuum bands from the UV to the red (UC, BC, GC, RC filters). We will present the dust and gas production rates of the brightest comets observed in 2014: C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS), C/2014 E2 (Jacques), C/2013 A1 (Siding Springs) and C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden). Each of these comets have been observed at least once a week for several weeks to several months. Light curves with respect to the heliocentric distance will be presented and discussed. [1] Jehin et al., The Messenger, 145, 2-6, 2011.[2] Farnham et al., Icarus, 147, 180-204, 2000. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailTRAPPIST monitoring of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)
Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2014, November 01), 46

C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a long period comet discovered by Robert H McNaught at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia on January 3, 2013 at 7.2 au from the Sun. This comet will make a close encounter ... [more ▼]

C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a long period comet discovered by Robert H McNaught at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia on January 3, 2013 at 7.2 au from the Sun. This comet will make a close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014. At this occasion the comet will be extensively observed both from Earth and from several orbiters around Mars.On September 20, 2013 when the comet was around 5 au from the Sun, we started a monitoring with the TRAPPIST robotic telescope installed at La Silla observatory [1]. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins B, V, Rc, and Ic filters.We observed the comet continuously at least once a week from September 20, 2013 to April 6, 2014 with broad band filters. We then recovered the comet on May 20. At this time we could detect the gas and started the observations with narrow band filters until early November, covering the close approach to Mars and the perihelion passage.We present here our first results about comet Siding Springs. From the images in the broad band filters and in the dust continuum filters we derived A(θ)fρ values [3] and studied the evolution of the comet activity with the heliocentric distance from September 20, 2013 to early November 2014. We could also detect gas since May 20, 2014. We thus derived gas production rates using a Haser model [4]. We present the evolution of gas production rates and gas production rates ratios with the heliocentric distance.Finally, we discuss the dust and gas coma morphology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWASP-104b and WASP-106b: two transiting hot Jupiters in 1.75-day and 9.3-day orbits
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014)

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d, whereas WASP-106b has the fourth-longest orbital period of any planet discovered by means of transits observed from the ground, orbiting every 9.29 d. Each planet is more massive than Jupiter (WASP-104b has a mass of 1.27±0.05 MJup, while WASP-106b has a mass of 1.93±0.08 MJup). Both planets are just slightly larger than Jupiter, with radii of 1.14±0.04 and 1.09±0.04 RJup for WASP-104 and WASP-106 respectively. No significant orbital eccentricity is detected in either system, and while this is not surprising in the case of the short-period WASP-104b, it is interesting in the case of WASP-106b, because many otherwise similar planets are known to have eccentric orbits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWASP-117b: a 10-day-period Saturn in an eccentric and misaligned orbit
Lendl, Monika ULg; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014), 568

We report the discovery of WASP-117b, the first planet with a period beyond 10 days found by the WASP survey. The planet has a mass of M_p = 0.2755 (+/-0.0090) M_jup, a radius of R_p = 1.021 (-0.065 +0 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-117b, the first planet with a period beyond 10 days found by the WASP survey. The planet has a mass of M_p = 0.2755 (+/-0.0090) M_jup, a radius of R_p = 1.021 (-0.065 +0.076) R_jup and is in an eccentric (e = 0.302 +/-0.023), 10.02165 +/- 0.00055 d orbit around a main-sequence F9 star. The host star's brightness (V=10.15 mag) makes WASP-117 a good target for follow-up observations, and with a planetary equilibrium temperature of T_eq = 1024 (-26 +30) K and a low planetary density (rho_p = 0.259 (-0.048 +0.054) rho_jup) it is one of the best targets for transmission spectroscopy among planets with periods around 10 days. From a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we infer a projected angle between the planetary orbit and stellar spin axes of beta = -44 (+/-11) deg, and we further derive an orbital obliquity of psi = 69.5 (+3.6 -3.1) deg. Owing to the large orbital separation, tidal forces causing orbital circularization and realignment of the planetary orbit with the stellar plane are weak, having had little impact on the planetary orbit over the system lifetime. WASP-117b joins a small sample of transiting giant planets with well characterized orbits at periods above ~8 days. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe evolving chemical composition of C/2012 S1 ISON as it approached the Sun
Dello Russo, N.; Vervack, R.; Weaver, H. et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2014 (2014, July 01)

Shortly after its discovery by Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok on September 21, 2012, the orbit of C/2012 S1 ISON was determined, indicating a perihelion passage very close to the Sun (0.012 au) in ... [more ▼]

Shortly after its discovery by Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok on September 21, 2012, the orbit of C/2012 S1 ISON was determined, indicating a perihelion passage very close to the Sun (0.012 au) in late November 2013. Initial observations suggested that ISON could be quite bright with a long period of favorable observing conditions leading up to perihelion, followed by a close post-perihelion approach to the Earth (0.42 au) in December 2013. Comet ISON thus became the first sungrazing comet discovered early enough to be studied for many months prior to perihelion, through its close solar passage, and potentially after perihelion. This spurred a worldwide campaign to coordinate observations of ISON from numerous facilities covering a broad spectral range. We report volatile abundances in comet ISON as determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy. Our strategy was to use the NIRSPEC spectrometer at the 10-m Keck observatory and the CSHELL spectrometer on the 3-m IRTF telescope. We proposed to use NIRSPEC when the comet was fainter but still available during darktime (October through early November 2013 pre-perihelion, and January 2014 post-perihelion), and CSHELL when the comet was brighter and closer to the Sun, but only available during daytime. Although observations on many dates were lost owing to poor weather, and the disruption of the comet near perihelion prevented any post-perihelion observations, successful observations were obtained with NIRSPEC on October 26 (R_h= 1.12 au, Δ = 1.38 au) and October 28 (R_h = 1.08 au, Δ = 1.32 au), and CSHELL on November 19 (R_h = 0.46 au, Δ = 0.86 au) and November 20 (R_h = 0.43 au, Δ = 0.86 au). All dates are specified in UT. The primary results from these observations are as follows. (1) The overall volatile productivity as measured by the H_2O production rate increased from ˜ 10^{28} molec/s on October 26 and 28 to ˜ 3-4×10^{29} molec/s on November 19/20. (2) The volatile production rate was increasing rapidly as ISON approached perihelion, and we investigate whether statistically significant variations in volatile production rates are seen on November 19 between UT 17:15 to 23:00. (3) The relative abundances of some measured volatiles with respect to water remained constant during this time period (e.g., C_2H_6 and CH_3OH), whereas others increased significantly from late October to November 19/20 (e.g., C_2H_2, NH_2, NH_3). (4) Comparison of the measured spatial distributions within the coma of ISON on November 19 show differences that suggest some species are released from extended sources in the coma as well as ices in the nucleus. (5) C_2H_6, CH_3OH and CH_4 appear slightly depleted relative to H_2O in ISON compared to other comets. C_2H_2, HCN, and OCS abundances appear to be in the typical range on November 19, although C_2H_2 abundances appeared depleted in October. Abundances of H_2CO, NH_2, and NH_3 in November were significantly enhanced compared to other comets, with NH_3 abundances being the highest measured to date in any comet. This contrasts with measured abundances and upper limits for NH_2 and NH_3 in late October, which are closer to the typical values seen in comets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe shape and rotation of the tumbling asteroid (99942) Apophis
Scheirich, P.; Pravec, P.; Durech, J. et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2014 (2014, July 01)

Photometric observations of the asteroid (99942) Apophis taken from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed that it is in a non-principal axis rotation state. We constructed a numerical model of the asteroid ... [more ▼]

Photometric observations of the asteroid (99942) Apophis taken from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed that it is in a non-principal axis rotation state. We constructed a numerical model of the asteroid's shape and rotation. The asteroid is in a short-axis mode (SAM) of excited rotation. The precession and rotation periods are P_φ = 27.38 ± 0.07 h and P_ψ = 263 ± 6 h, respectively. The rotation is retrograde with the angular momentum vector's ecliptic longitude and latitude of 250° and -75° (the uncertainty area is approximately an ellipse with the major and minor semiaxes of 27° and 14°, respectively). The shape of the asteroid is dynamically close to a prolate ellipsoid, with the lengths of largest and intermediate axes of 1.64 ± 0.09 and 1.14^{+0.04}_{-0.08}, respectively (the shortest axis is normalized to unity); the largest and intermediate moments of inertia differ by 3-4 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHigh-dispersion spectroscopic observations of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) with the Subaru Telescope on 2013 November 15
Shinnaka, Y.; Kawakita, H.; Nagashima, M. et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) probably originates from the Oort Cloud. Comet Lovejoy provided us with great opportunities to investigate the chemical composition of the comet thanks to its brightness and ... [more ▼]

Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) probably originates from the Oort Cloud. Comet Lovejoy provided us with great opportunities to investigate the chemical composition of the comet thanks to its brightness and elongation angle from October 2013 to March 2014. We observed comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) on 2013 November 15 UT using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 1.066 and 0.412 au, respectively. The obtained spectra cover the wavelength region from 360 to 830 nm with the resolving power of R = λ/Δλ = 72,000 for the slit size of 0''.5 × 9''.0 (360-520 nm) and 0''.5 × 9''.0 (550-830 nm) on the sky. Exposure time was 130 minutes in total (100 minutes for shorter and 30 minutes for longer wavelength regions). We could identify many species such as the radicals (CN, CH, C_{3}, C_{2}, NH_{2}, etc.), ions (CH^{+}, H_{2}O^{+}), and atoms ([OI] and NaI) in the spectra and many unidentified lines were also detected. Here we discuss the chemical reaction in cometary coma and the origin of icy materials of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), based on the high-dispersion spectra in the optical wavelength regions. We present (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia inferred from the high-dispersion spectra of H_{2}O^{+} and NH_{2}, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the nitrogen and the carbon isotopic ratios of CN, and (4) spatial distributions of radicals, atoms, and dust continuum in the inner coma. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDense and narrow rings discovered around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo
Sicardy, B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Benedetti-Rossi, G. et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

A stellar occultation observed on June 3, 2013 revealed the unexpected presence of two dense rings around (10199) Chariklo [1], the largest Centaur object known to date with a radius of 124±9 km [2]. The ... [more ▼]

A stellar occultation observed on June 3, 2013 revealed the unexpected presence of two dense rings around (10199) Chariklo [1], the largest Centaur object known to date with a radius of 124±9 km [2]. The two rings have respective orbital radii, widths, and normal optical depths of a_1= 391 km, W_1= 7 km, τ_1= 0.4 and a_2= 405 km, W_2= 3 km, τ_2= 0.06 [1]. They are separated by a gap of about 9 km with an optical depth less than 0.004 (1-sigma limit). The presence of those rings has been confirmed during another stellar occultation observed from ESO/NTT La Silla, ESO/VLT Paranal and San Pedro de Atacama on February 16, 2014. More results on the azimuthal variations of the rings and mass estimations of their putative shepherding satellites will be presented. This is the first ring system ever observed that does not pertain to a giant planet. The existence of such a system raises several questions as to the origin and evolution of rings around such a small object. This discovery also suggests that rings may be a more frequent feature than previously thought, in particular, around small bodies. Possible models for the ring formation will be proposed. They can be classified into collisional scenarios that disrupted an impactor or a pre-existing satellite, tidal disruption of an inward-migrating satellite, or material produced by a cometary activity of the central body. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDistant activity of comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) as observed with Herschel
de Val-Borro, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

We aimed to measure the H_2O and dust production rates in C/2006 W3 (Christensen) with the Herschel Space Observatory at a heliocentric distance of ˜ 5 au and compare these data with previous post ... [more ▼]

We aimed to measure the H_2O and dust production rates in C/2006 W3 (Christensen) with the Herschel Space Observatory at a heliocentric distance of ˜ 5 au and compare these data with previous post-perihelion Herschel and ground-based observations at ˜ 3.3 au from the Sun (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2010b). We have searched for emission in the H_2O and NH_3 ground-state rotational transitions at 557 GHz and 572 GHz, simultaneously, toward comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) onboard Herschel on UT 1.5 September 2010. Photometric observations of the dust coma in the 70 μ m to 160 μ m channels were acquired with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instrument on UT 26.5 August 2010. A tentative 4-σ H_2O line emission feature was found in the spectra obtained with the HIFI wide-band and high-resolution spectrometers, from which we derive a water production rate of 2.0(5)×10^{27} molec. s^{-1}. A 3-σ upper limit for the ammonia production rate of < 1.5×10^{27} molec. s^{-1} is obtained taking into account the contribution from all hyperfine components (Biver et al. 2012). The dust thermal emission was detected in the 70-μ m to 160-μ m filters, with a more extended emission in the blue channel. We fit the radial dependence of the surface brightness with radially symmetric profiles for the blue and red bands. The dust production rates, obtained for a dust size distribution index that explains the fluxes at the photocenters of the PACS images, lie in the range 70-110 kg s^{-1}. Scaling the CO production rate measured post-perihelion at 3.20-3.32 au, these values correspond to a dust-to-gas production rate ratio in the range 0.3-0.4. The blueshift of the water line detected by HIFI suggests preferential emission from the subsolar point. However, it is also possible that water sublimation occurs in small ice-bearing grains that are emitted from an active region on the nucleus surface at a speed of ˜ 0.2 km s^{-1}. The dust production rates derived in August 2010 are roughly one order of magnitude lower than in September 2009, suggesting that the dust-to-gas production rate ratio remained approximately constant during the period when the activity became increasingly dominated by CO outgassing. These data will complement available Herschel observations of the distant activity of other comets such as 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2010a) and main-belt comets 176P/LINEAR and P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) (de Val-Borro et al. 2012, O'Rourke et al. 2013). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe activity cycle of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
Snodgrass, C.; Barrera, L.; Boehnhardt, H. et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

We present ground-based observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target of the Rosetta mission, and an assessment on its activity levels. Based on imaging in the R-band, we measure the brightness ... [more ▼]

We present ground-based observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target of the Rosetta mission, and an assessment on its activity levels. Based on imaging in the R-band, we measure the brightness of the coma within various apertures and use this to assess the amount of dust in the coma. We find that the comet begins to show detectable activity at a pre-perihelion distance from the Sun of 4.3 au, and then shows a smooth increase in production to a peak around one month after perihelion passage. The behaviour of the comet is consistent from one orbit to another, based on archival images taken over three apparitions, and we therefore use the heliocentric lightcurve to make predictions for the 2014/5 period while Rosetta is operating at the comet. We find that the Afρ parameter, measured within an aperture of radius 10,000 km at the comet, is proportional to r^{-3.2}, pre-perihelion [1]. We also attempt to make predictions on the gas production rate by fitting a model to the observed brightness values. This is done by assuming various parameters about the nucleus and dust, many of which are reasonably well constrained for 67P, and solving an energy balance equation that gives the sublimation rate of various ices as a function of solar illumination [2]. The model then links the gas production rate to the total amount of dust in the coma, and its brightness. We find that only a small fraction of the surface area (1.4 %) needs to be active for water sublimation, with an extra peak (up to 4 %) for a month either side of perihelion, while an even smaller area is producing CO_2 (0.04-0.09 %) [1]. The predictions can now be tested against new observations, and we will present the latest results from our 2014 monitoring of 67P. We are performing regular R-band imaging on the comet using the VLT, and early indications in March 2014 indicate that the comet does appear to have returned to activity as expected. By the time of the ACM meeting we will have around 4 months of imaging to make a clear assessment of the trend between 4.4 and 3.8 au, which will allow a comparison with our model and therefore predictions to be made of how well 67P appears to be following its previous activity pattern. By July, we will also have obtained the first of a series of VLT/FORS visible wavelength spectra, to make a direct search for gas emission lines. These will represent some of the most distant spectroscopic observations of a Jupiter family comet coma. Preliminary results will be shown from these spectra, which will also constrain the expected evolution of activity as Rosetta approaches the comet. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHigh-resolution spectra of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy)
Rousselot, P.; Decock, A.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) is a long-period comet discovered on 7 September 2013 by Terry Lovejoy with a 0.2-m telescope (Guido et al., 2013), it passed its perihelion (0.81 au) on 22 December 2013. It was ... [more ▼]

Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) is a long-period comet discovered on 7 September 2013 by Terry Lovejoy with a 0.2-m telescope (Guido et al., 2013), it passed its perihelion (0.81 au) on 22 December 2013. It was a bright comet visible to the naked eye. We obtained high-resolution spectra of this comet immediately after its perihelion passage during 4 nights in the period 23-26 December 2013. These spectra have been obtained with the 3.5-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher in North hemisphere (HARPS-N) echelle spectrograph. HARPS-N is an echelle spectrograph covering the spectral range from 383 to 693 nm, with a spectral resolution of R=115000 (Cosentino et al., 2012). It is designed to measure stellar radial velocities in view of detecting extrasolar planets. Our observations are the first successful cometary observations performed with this instrument. They demonstrate that this spectrograph can also be efficient for getting cometary spectra, even if the sensitivity of this instrument is low in the blue part of its spectral coverage. We will present the results of our data analysis for these spectra. This analysis is focused on isotopic ratios, mainly ^{12}C/^{13}C with C_2 emission lines (with the method described in Rousselot et al. 2012) and ^{14}N/^{15}N with ^{14}NH_2 and ^{15}NH_2 emission lines (with the line wavelengths given in Rousselot et al. 2014), atomic oxygen emission lines at 557.7, 630.0 and 636.4 nm (intensity ratios and widths, see Decock et al. 2013) and relative production rates of the detected species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailTRAPPIST monitoring of comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy)
Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Muinonen, Karri (Ed.) Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - Book of Abstracts (2014, July 01)

We present the results of a dense photometric monitoring of comets C/2012 S1 (Ison) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using narrow-band cometary filters and the 60-cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope [1]. We were able to ... [more ▼]

We present the results of a dense photometric monitoring of comets C/2012 S1 (Ison) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using narrow-band cometary filters and the 60-cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope [1]. We were able to isolate the emission of the OH, NH, CN, C_2, and C_3 radicals for both comets as well as the dust continuum in four bands. By applying a Haser model [2] and fitting the observed profiles, we derive gas production rates. From the continuum bands, we computed the dust Afρ parameters [3]. We were able to follow the evolution of the gas and dust activity of these comets for weeks, looking for changes with the heliocentric distance, study the coma morphology, and analyze their composition and dust coma properties. Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was observed about three times a week from October 12 (r=1.43 au) to November 23, 2013. It was then at a heliocentric distance of 0.33 au, only five days before perihelion, when it disintegrated. This dense monitoring allowed us to detect fast changes of the cometary activity. We observed a slowly rising activity in October and early November, and two major outbursts around November 13 and November 19 [4], the gas and dust production rates being multiplied by at least a factor of five during each outburst and then slowly decreasing in the following days. These outbursts were correlated with changes in gas-production-rate ratios. The coma morphology study revealed strong jets in both gas and dust filters. Since the comet was very active in November, we were even able to detect OH jets in our images. Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was observed before perihelion from September 9 (r=1.94 au) to November 16 (r=1.12 au), 2013 when the comet was too far North. We recovered the comet post-perihelion on February 13 (r=1.24 au), 2014 and planned to observe it until May (r=2.5 au) with narrow-band filters. We compare the evolution of gas and dust activity as well as the evolution of gas production rates ratios on both sides of perihelion. The morphological study of both gas and dust coma we already performed on pre-perihelion images revealed structures in gas and dust filters. We compare the gas and dust features in all filters and study their evolution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)