References of "Jehin, Emmanuel"
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See detailA Herschel Study of D/H in Water in the Jupiter-family Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková and Prospects for D/H Measurements with CCAT
Lis, D. C.; Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2013), 774

We present Herschel observations of water isotopologues in the atmosphere of the Jupiter-family comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková. No HDO emission is detected, with a 3σ upper limit of 2.0 × 10[SUP]–4 ... [more ▼]

We present Herschel observations of water isotopologues in the atmosphere of the Jupiter-family comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková. No HDO emission is detected, with a 3σ upper limit of 2.0 × 10[SUP]–4[/SUP] for the D/H ratio. This value is consistent with the earlier Herschel measurement in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2. The canonical value of 3 × 10[SUP]–4[/SUP] measured pre-Herschel in a sample of Oort-cloud comets can be excluded at a 4.5σ level. The observations presented here further confirm that a diversity of D/H ratios exists in the comet population and emphasize the need for additional measurements with future ground-based facilities, such as CCAT, in the post-Herschel era. [less ▲]

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See detailComets C/2012 V2 (LINEAR) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy)
Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams (2013), 3659

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See detailThe Size, Shape, Albedo, Density, and Atmospheric Limit of Transneptunian Object (50000) Quaoar from Multi-chord Stellar Occultations
Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2013), 773

We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation ... [more ▼]

We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius R [SUB]equiv[/SUB] = 555 ± 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo p[SUB]V[/SUB] = 0.109 ± 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of \epsilon = 0.087^{+0.0268}_{-0.0175}, an equatorial radius of 569^{+24}_{-17} km, and a density of 1.99 ± 0.46 g cm[SUP]–3[/SUP]. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh angular resolution imaging and infrared spectroscopy of CoRoT candidates
Guenther, E. W.; Fridlund, M.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 556

Context. Studies of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance for understanding the nature of planets outside our solar system because their masses, diameters, and bulk densities can be measured ... [more ▼]

Context. Studies of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance for understanding the nature of planets outside our solar system because their masses, diameters, and bulk densities can be measured. An important part of transit-search programmes is the removal of false-positives. In the case of the CoRoT space mission, the majority of the false-positives are removed by a detailed analysis of the light curves and by seeing-limited imaging in- and out-of-transit. However, the critical question is how many of the candidates that passed all these tests are false-positives. Such false-positives can be caused by eclipsing binaries, which are either related or unrelated to the targets. <BR /> Aims: For our study we selected 25 CoRoT candidates that have already been screened against false-positives using detailed analysis of the light curves and seeing-limited imaging, which has transits that are between 0.7 and 0.05% deep. Our aim is to search for companion candidates that had not been recognized in previous observations. <BR /> Methods: We observed 20 candidates with the adaptive optics imager NaCo and 18 with the high-resolution infrared spectrograph CRIRES. <BR /> Results: We found previously unknown stars within 2'' of the targets in seven of the candidates. All of these are too faint and too close to the targets to have been previously detected with seeing-limited telescopes in the optical. Our study thus leads to the surprising results that if we remove all candidates excluded by the sophisticated analysis of the light-curve, as well as carrying out deep imaging with seeing-limited telescopes, still 28-35% of the remaining candidates are found to possess companions that are bright enough to be false-positives. <BR /> Conclusions: Given that the companion candidates cluster around the targets and that the J - K colours are consistent with physical companions, we conclude that the companion candidates are more likely to be physical companions rather than unrelated field stars. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile in programmes 282.C-5015A, 282.C-5015B, 282.C-5015C, 285.C-5045A, and 285.C-5045B, 086.C-0235A, 086.C-0235B, 088.C-0707A, 088.C-0707B, 090.C-0251A, 090.C-0251B, and 091.C-203(A).Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailTowards the first transmission spectrum of a gas giant transiting an M-dwarf
Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Lendl, M. et al

Poster (2013, July 15)

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these new worlds. In this exciting context, we are currently ... [more ▼]

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these new worlds. In this exciting context, we are currently conducting a VLT observing campaign on a rare exoplanet specimen, WASP-80b, a gas giant in close orbit around a bright nearby M-dwarf. Even if this planet belongs to the hot-Jupiter population, it is actually more ‘warm’ than ‘hot’ with an estimated equilibrium temperature of only 800K. We present here some preliminary results of this program which consists in monitoring four transits of WASP-80b with the FORS2 instrument in multi-object spectroscopic mode in ESO phase 91. Through this approach, our goal is to precisely measure the transmission spectrum of the planet between 740 and 1070 nm in order to constrain the thermal structure and scacering properties of the planetary atmosphere. Furthermore, we will use the water features located around 950 nm to constrain the water mixing ratio in the atmosphere of this peculiar hot Jupiter. [less ▲]

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See detailSPECULOOS: Search for habitable Planets EClipsing ULtra-cOOl Stars
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Delrez, Laetitia ULg et al

Poster (2013, July 01)

The 1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside our solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30 ... [more ▼]

The 1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside our solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30-100 times closer than for the Sun, the corresponding orbital periods ranging from one to a few days. Thanks to this proximity, the transits of a habitable planet are much more probable and frequent than for an Earth-Sun analog, while their tiny size (about 1 Jupiter radius) leads to transits deep enough for a ground-based detection, even for sub-Earth size planets. Furthermore, a habitable planet transiting one of these nearby ultra-cool stars would be amenable for a thorough atmospheric characterization, including the detection of possible biosignatures, notably with the near-to-come JWST. Motivated by these reasons, we have set up the concept of a ground-based survey optimized for detecting planets of Earth-size and below transiting the nearest Southern ultra-cool stars. We present here this concept and its status. [less ▲]

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See detailSearch for a habitable terrestrial planet transiting the nearby red dwarf GJ 1214
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Demory, B.-O.; Madhusudhan, N. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013)

High-precision eclipse spectrophotometry of transiting terrestrial exoplanets represents a promising path for the first atmospheric characterizations of habitable worlds and the search for life outside ... [more ▼]

High-precision eclipse spectrophotometry of transiting terrestrial exoplanets represents a promising path for the first atmospheric characterizations of habitable worlds and the search for life outside our solar system. The detection of terrestrial planets transiting nearby late-type M-dwarfs could make this approach applicable within the next decade, with soon-to-come general facilities. In this context, we previously identified GJ 1214 as a high-priority target for a transit search, as the transit probability of a habitable planet orbiting this nearby M4.5 dwarf would be significantly enhanced by the transiting nature of GJ 1214 b, the super-Earth already known to orbit the star. Based on this observation, we have set up an ambitious high-precision photometric monitoring of GJ 1214 with the Spitzer Space Telescope to probe the inner part of its habitable zone in search of a transiting planet as small as Mars. We present here the results of this transit search. Unfortunately, we did not detect any other transiting planets. Assuming that GJ 1214 hosts a habitable planet larger than Mars that has an orbital period smaller than 20.9 days, our global analysis of the whole Spitzer dataset leads to an a posteriori no-transit probability of ~98%. Our analysis allows us to significantly improve the characterization of GJ 1214 b, to measure its occultation depth to be 70 ± 35 ppm at 4.5 mum, and to constrain it to be smaller than 205 ppm (3sigma upper limit) at 3.6 mum. In agreement with the many transmission measurements published so far for GJ 1214 b, these emission measurements are consistent with both a metal-rich and a cloudy hydrogen-rich atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailFast-evolving weather for the coolest of our two new substellar neighbours
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 555

We present the results of an intense photometric monitoring in the near-infrared (~0.9 microns) with the TRAPPIST robotic telescope of the newly discovered binary brown dwarf WISE J104915.57-531906.1, the ... [more ▼]

We present the results of an intense photometric monitoring in the near-infrared (~0.9 microns) with the TRAPPIST robotic telescope of the newly discovered binary brown dwarf WISE J104915.57-531906.1, the third closest system to the Sun at a distance of only 2 pc. Our twelve nights of photometric time-series reveal a quasi-periodic (P = 4.87+-0.01 h) variability with a maximal peak-peak amplitude of ~11% and strong night-to-night evolution. We attribute this variability to the rotational modulation of fast-evolving weather patterns in the atmosphere of the coolest component (~T1-type) of the binary. No periodic signal is detected for the hottest component (~L8-type). For both brown dwarfs, our data allow us to firmly discard any unique transit during our observations for planets >= 2 Rearth. For orbital periods smaller than ~9.5 h, transiting planets are excluded down to an Earth-size. [less ▲]

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See detailForbidden oxygen lines in comets at various heliocentric distances
Decock, Alice ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 555

We present a study of the three forbidden oxygen lines [OI] located in the optical region - i.e., 5577.339 Å (the green line), 6300.304 Å and 6363.776 Å (the two red lines) - in order to better understand ... [more ▼]

We present a study of the three forbidden oxygen lines [OI] located in the optical region - i.e., 5577.339 Å (the green line), 6300.304 Å and 6363.776 Å (the two red lines) - in order to better understand the production of these atoms in cometary atmospheres. The analysis is based on 48 high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra collected with UVES at the ESO VLT between 2003 and 2011 referring to 12 comets of different origins observed at various heliocentric distances. The flux ratio of the green line to the sum of the two red lines is evaluated to determine the parent species of the oxygen atoms by comparison with theoretical models. This analysis confirms that, at about 1 AU, H[SUB]2[/SUB]O is the main parent molecule producing oxygen atoms. At heliocentric distances >2.5 AU, this ratio changes rapidly, an indication that other molecules are starting to contribute. The most abundant species after H[SUB]2[/SUB]O in the coma, CO and CO[SUB]2[/SUB], are good candidates, and the ratio is used to estimate their abundances. We found that the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] abundance relative to H[SUB]2[/SUB]O in comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) observed at 4 AU can be as high as ~70%. The intrinsic widths of the oxygen lines were also measured. The green line is on average about 1 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] broader than the red lines, while the theory predicts that the red lines are broader. This might be due to the nature of the excitation source or to a contribution of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] as the parent molecule of the 5577.339 Å line. At 4 AU, we found that the width of the green and red lines in comet C/2001 Q4 are the same, which could be explained if CO[SUB]2[/SUB] becomes the main contributor to the three [OI] lines at high heliocentric distances. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programs ID 268.C-5570, 270.C-5043, 073.C-0525, 274.C-5015, 075.C-0355, 080.C-0615, 280.C-5053, 086.C-0958, and 087.C-0929. [less ▲]

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See detailComets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), C/2013 E2 (Iwamoto), and 63P/Wild
Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams (2013), 3530

CBET 3530 available at Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.

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See detailThe TRAPPIST survey of southern transiting planets – Physical properties of the WASP-36 planetary system
Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 29)

We present ten new transit light curves obtained with the TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) and Euler telescopes for the recently discovered planetary system WASP-36 (Smith ... [more ▼]

We present ten new transit light curves obtained with the TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) and Euler telescopes for the recently discovered planetary system WASP-36 (Smith et al. 2012). Thanks to this extensive data set, we are able to confirm and improve the parameters of the system. WASP-36 is a solar-mass G2 dwarf which hosts a giant planet on a 1.54 d orbit. With a mass of ~2.3 MJup and a radius of ~1.3 RJup, this planet is slightly denser than Jupiter. One of the most interesting properties of the system is its low stellar metallicity ([Fe/H] =-0.26+-0.10), as giant planets are actually known to be rare around such stars (e.g. Fischer & Valenti 2005). Furthermore, due to its small orbital distance and large radius, WASP-36b is an exquisite target for spectrophotometric emission measurements able to constrain the thermal and chemical properties of its atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailTRAPPIST-UCDTS: A prototype search for habitable planets transiting ultra-cool stars
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Fumel, A. et al

in Saglia, Roberto (Ed.) European Physical Journal Web of Conferences (2013, April 01)

The ˜1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30-100 ... [more ▼]

The ˜1000 nearest ultra-cool stars (spectral type M6 and latter) represent a unique opportunity for the search for life outside solar system. Due to their small luminosity, their habitable zone is 30-100 times closer than for the Sun, the corresponding orbital periods ranging from one to a few days. Thanks to this proximity, the transits of a habitable planet are much more probable and frequent than for an Earth-Sun analog, while their tiny size (˜1 Jupiter radius) leads to transits deep enough for a ground-based detection, even for sub-Earth size planets. Furthermore, a habitable planet transiting one of these nearby ultra-cool star would be amenable for a thorough atmospheric characterization, including the detection of possible biosignatures, notably with the near-to-come JWST. Motivated by these reasons, we have set up the concept of a ground-based survey optimized for detecting planets of Earth-size and below transiting the nearest Southern ultra-cool stars. To assess thoroughly the actual potential of this future survey, we are currently conducting a prototype mini-survey using the TRAPPIST robotic 60cm telescope located at La Silla ESO Observatory (Chile). We summarize here the preliminary results of this mini-survey that fully validate our concept. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-64b and WASP-72b: two new transiting highly irradiated giant planets
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 552

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of two new highly irradiated giant planets. WASP-64 b is slightly more massive (1.271 ± 0.068 MJup) and larger (1.271 ± 0.039 RJup) than Jupiter, and is ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of two new highly irradiated giant planets. WASP-64 b is slightly more massive (1.271 ± 0.068 MJup) and larger (1.271 ± 0.039 RJup) than Jupiter, and is in very-short (a = 0.02648 ± 0.00024 AU, P = 1.5732918 ± 0.0000015 days) circular orbit around a V = 12.3 G7-type dwarf (1.004 ± 0.028 Msun, 1.058 ± 0.025 Rsun, Teff = 5500 ± 150 K). Its size is typical of hot Jupiters with similar masses. WASP-72 b has also a mass a bit higher than Jupiter's (1.461-0.056+0.059 MJup) and orbits very close (0.03708 ± 0.00050 AU, P = 2.2167421 ± 0.0000081 days) to a bright (V = 9.6) and moderately evolved F7-type star (1.386 ± 0.055 Msun, 1.98 ± 0.24 Rsun, Teff = 6250 ± 100 K). Despite its extreme irradiation (~5.5 × 109 erg s-1 cm-2), WASP-72 b has a moderate size (1.27 ± 0.20 RJup) that could suggest a significant enrichment in heavy elements. Nevertheless, the errors on its physical parameters are still too high to draw any strong inference on its internal structure or its possible peculiarity. [less ▲]

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See detailL’eau dans l’univers
Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Magain, Pierre ULg et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

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See detailSearching for water in the atmosphere of the hot Saturn WASP-49b
Delrez, Laetitia ULg; Lendl, M.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

Poster (2013, March 11)

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these 'new worlds'. In this exciting context, we present here ... [more ▼]

At the forefront of comparative exoplanetology, the atmospheric characterization of transiting exoplanets is revealing the intimate nature of these 'new worlds'. In this exciting context, we present here some preliminary results of our VLT program that consisted in monitoring three transits of the new 'hot Saturn' WASP-49b (Lendl et al. 2012) with the FORS instrument in Multi-Object Spectroscopic mode (MXU). [less ▲]

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See detailComets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2011 L4 (Panstarrs)
Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams (2013), 3433

CBET 3433 available at Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.

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See detailWASP-54b, WASP-56b and WASP-57b: Three new sub-Jupiter mass planets from SuperWASP
Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence ... [more ▼]

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence, every 3.69 days. Our MCMC fit of the system yields a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.067+0.033-0.025) for WASP-54b. We investigated further the veracity of our detection of the eccentric orbit for WASP-54b, and we find that it could be real. However, given the brightness of WASP-54 V = 10.42 mag, we encourage observations of a secondary eclipse to draw robust conclusions on both the orbital eccentricity and the thermal structure of the planet. WASP-56b and WASP-57b have masses of 0.571+0.034-0.035MJ and 0.672+0.049-0.046MJ, respectively; and radii of 1.092+0.035-0.033RJ for WASP-56b and 0.916+0.017-0.014RJ for WASP-57b. They orbit main sequence stars of spectral type G6 every 4.67 and 2.84 days, respectively. WASP-56b and WASP-57b show no radius anomaly and a high density possibly implying a large core of heavy elements; possibly as high as ~50 M⊕ in the case of WASP-57b. However,the composition of the deep interior of exoplanets remains still undetermined. Thus, more exoplanet discoveries such as the ones presented in this paper, are needed to understand and constrain giant planets' physical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-80b: a gas giant transiting a cool dwarf
Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star <ASTROBJ>WASP-80</ASTROBJ> (<ASTROBJ>1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>2MASS J20124017-0208391</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>TYC 5165-481-1</ASTROBJ>; <ASTROBJ>BPM 80815</ASTROBJ>; V = 11.9, K = 8.4). Our analysis shows this is a 0.55 ± 0.04 M[SUB]jup[/SUB], 0.95 ± 0.03 R[SUB]jup[/SUB] gas giant on a circular 3.07 day orbit around a star with a spectral type between K7V and M0V. This system produces one of the largest transit depths so far reported, making it a worthwhile target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a large discrepancy between the vsini[SUB]⋆[/SUB] inferred from stellar line broadening and the observed amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This can be understood either by an orbital plane nearly perpendicular to the stellar spin or by an additional, unaccounted for source of broadening. Using WASP-South photometric observations, from Sutherland (South Africa), confirmed with the 60 cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope, EulerCam, and the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope, and HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 089.C-0151), all three located at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity and photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A>(<A href="http://130.79.128.5">130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80</A> [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-77 Ab: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet in a Wide Binary System
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (2013), 125

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD 07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 V star (V=10.3) with a metallicity close to solar ([Fe/H] = 0.0 ± 0.1). The companion star, WASP-77 B, is a K-dwarf approximately 2 mag fainter at a separation of approximately 3″. The spectrum of WASP-77 A shows emission in the cores of the Caii H and K lines, indicative of moderate chromospheric activity. The Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) light curves show photometric variability with a period of 15.3 days and an amplitude of about 0.3% that is probably due to the magnetic activity of the host star. We use an analysis of the combined photometric and spectroscopic data to derive the mass and radius of the planet (1.76 ± 0.06 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 1.21 ± 0.02 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]). The age of WASP-77 A estimated from its rotation rate (˜1 Gyr) agrees with the age estimated in a similar way for WASP-77 B (˜0.6 Gyr) but is in poor agreement with the age inferred by comparing its effective temperature and density to stellar models (˜8 Gyr). Follow-up observations of WASP-77 Ab will make a useful contribution to our understanding of the influence of binarity and host star activity on the properties of hot Jupiters. [less ▲]

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See detailSpitzer Transits of the Super-Earth GJ1214b and Implications for Its Atmosphere
Fraine, Jonathan D.; Deming, Drake; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2013), 765(2), 127

We observed the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b using Warm Spitzer at 4.5 microns wavelength during a 20-day quasi-continuous sequence in May 2011. The goals of our long observation were to ... [more ▼]

We observed the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b using Warm Spitzer at 4.5 microns wavelength during a 20-day quasi-continuous sequence in May 2011. The goals of our long observation were to accurately define the infrared transit radius of this nearby super-Earth, to search for the secondary eclipse, and to search for other transiting planets in the habitable zone of GJ1214. We here report results from the transit monitoring of GJ1214b, including a re-analysis of previous transit observations by Desert et al. (2011). In total, we analyse 14 transits of GJ1214b at 4.5 microns, 3 transits at 3.6 microns, and 7 new ground-based transits in the I+z band. Our new Spitzer data by themselves eliminate cloudless solar composition atmospheres for GJ1214b, and methane-rich models from Howe & Burrows (2012). Using our new Spitzer measurements to anchor the observed transit radii of GJ1214b at long wavelengths, and adding new measurements in I+z, we evaluate models from Benneke & Seager (2012) and Howe & Burrows (2012) using a chi-squared analysis. We find that the best-fit model exhibits an increase in transit radius at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering. Pure water atmospheres are also possible. However, a flat line (no atmosphere detected) remains among the best of the statistically acceptable models, and better than pure water atmospheres. We explore the effect of systematic differences among results from different observational groups, and we find that the Howe & Burrows (2012) tholin-haze model remains the best fit, even when systematic differences among observers are considered. [less ▲]

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