References of "Javaux, Emmanuelle"
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See detailSpatio-temporal natural and anthropogenic environmental variability during the last 1500yrs in an ombrotrophic bog (East Belgium).
De Vleeschouwer, François; Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Allan, Mohamed et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailLes traces de vie au Précambrien et la fossilisation
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2010)

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See detailHabitability from stars to cells
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Dehant, Véronique

in Astronomy and Astrophysics Review (2010), 18(DOI: 10.1007/s00159-010-0030-4), 1-34

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See detailEvolution de la biosphère précambrienne
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Learning material (2010)

powerpoint et articles sur MyULg

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See detailOrigine de la vie : où, quand, comment ?.
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailAstrobiologie : origine, évolution et distribution de la vie dans l’univers.
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailLa vie dans l’univers
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailLa vie hors du système solaire, science ou fiction ?
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailOrganic-walled microfossils in 3.2-billion-year-old shallow-marine siliciclastic deposits
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Marshall, Craig P.; Bekker, Andrey

in Nature (2010), doi:10.1038/nature08793(463), 934-938

Although the notion of an early origin and diversification of life on Earth during the Archaean eon has received increasing support in geochemical, sedimentological and palaeontological evidence ... [more ▼]

Although the notion of an early origin and diversification of life on Earth during the Archaean eon has received increasing support in geochemical, sedimentological and palaeontological evidence, ambiguities and controversies persist regarding the biogenicity and syngeneity of the record older than Late Archaean1–3. Nonbiological processes are known to produce morphologies similar to some microfossils4,5, and hydrothermal fluids have the potential to produce abiotic organic compounds with depleted carbon isotope values6, making it difficult to establish unambiguous traces of life. Here we report the discovery of a population of large (up to about 300 mmin diameter) carbonaceous spheroidal microstructures in Mesoarchaean shales and siltstones of the Moodies Group, South Africa, the Earth’s oldest siliciclastic alluvial to tidalestuarine deposits7. These microstructures are interpreted as organic-walled microfossils on the basis of petrographic and geochemical evidence for their endogenicity and syngeneity, their carbonaceous composition, cellular morphology and ultrastructure, occurrence in populations, taphonomic features of soft wall deformation, and the geological context plausible for life, as well as a lack of abiotic explanation falsifying a biological origin. These are the oldest and largest Archaean organic-walled spheroidal microfossils reported so far. Our observations suggest that relatively large microorganisms cohabited with earlier reported benthic microbial mats8 in the photic zone of marginal marine siliciclastic environments 3.2 billion years ago. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrofossil evidence for +21 m eustatic sea level during marine isotope stage 11
van Hengstum, P. J.; Scott, Dave; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2009, October)

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See detailSearching for traces of life in ancient stromatolites down to the nanoscale.
Lepot, Kevin ULg; Philippot, Pascal; Benzerara, Karim et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailLes premières traces de vie
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2009)

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See detailLes premières traces de vie
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2009)

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See detailOrigin and early evolution of life
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2009)

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See detailEvolution de la vie pendant les quatre premiers milliards d’années
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Bulletin de la Société Royale des Sciences de Liège (2009), 79

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See detailForaminifera in elevated Bermudian caves provide further evidence for +21 m eustatic sea level during Marine Isotope Stage 11
van hengstum, P. J.; Scott, David; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2009), 28(19-20), 1850-1860

Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 deposits in small Bermudian caves at þ21 m above modern sea level: (1) a þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level highstand ... [more ▼]

Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 deposits in small Bermudian caves at þ21 m above modern sea level: (1) a þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level highstand, and (2) a MIS 11 mega-tsunami event. Importantly, the foraminifera reported in these caves have yet to be critically evaluated within a framework of coastal cave environments. After statistically comparing foraminifera in modern Bermudian littoral caves and the MIS 11 Calonectris Pocket A (þ21 m cave) to the largest available database of Bermudian coastal foraminifera, the assemblages found in modern littoral caves – and Calonectris Pocket A – cannot be statistically differentiated from lagoons. This observation is expected considering littoral caves are simply sheltered extensions of a lagoon environment in the littoral zone, where typical coastal processes (waves, storms) homogenize and rework lagoonal, reefal, and occasional planktic taxa. Fossil protoconchs of the Bermudian cave stygobite Caecum caverna were also associated with the foraminifera. These results indicate that the MIS 11 Bermudian caves are fossil littoral caves (breached flank margin caves), where the total MIS 11 microfossil assemblage is preserving a signature of coeval sea level at þ21 m. Brackish foraminifera (Polysaccammina, Pseudothurammina) and anchialine gastropods (w95%, >300 individuals) indicate a brackish anchialine habitat developed in the elevated caves after the prolonged littoral environmental phase. The onset of sea-level regression following the þ21 m highstand would first lower the ancient brackish Ghyben-Herzberg lens (<0.5 m) and flood the cave with brackish water, followed by drainage of the cave to create a permanent vadose environment. These interpretations of the MIS 11 microfossils (considering both taphonomy and paleoecology) are congruent with the micropaleontological, hydrogeological and physical mechanisms influencing modern Bermudian coastal cave environments. In conclusion, we reject the mega-tsunami hypothesis, concur with the þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level hypothesis, and reiterate the need to resolve the disparity between global marine isotopic records and the physical geologic evidence for sea level during MIS 11. [less ▲]

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