References of "Javaux, Emmanuelle"
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See detailThe early eukaryotic fossa record
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2007), 607

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the ... [more ▼]

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the evolution of major biological innovations. The late Archean record for eukaryotes is limited to trace amounts of biomarkers. Morphological evidence appears in late Paleoproterozoic and early Mesoproterozoic (1800-1300 Ma) rocks. The moderate diversity of preservable eukaryotic organisms includes cell walls without surface ornament (but with complex ultrastructure), with regularly distributed surface ornamentation, and with irregularly or regularly arranged processes. Collectively, these fossils suggest that eukaryotes with flexible membranes and cytoskeletons existed in mid-Proterozoic oceans. The late Mesoproterozoic-early Neoproterozoic (1300-750 Ma) is a time of diversification and evolution when direct evidence for important biological innovations occurs in the fossil record such as multicellularity, sex, photosynthesis, biomineralization, predation, and heterotrophy. Members of extant clades can be recognized and include bangiophyte red algae, xanthophyte algae, cladophorale green algae, euglyphid, lobose, and filose amoebae and possible fungi. In the late Neoproterozoic, besides more diversification of ornamented fossils, florideophyte red algae and brown algae diversify, and animals take the stage. The record of biological innovations documented by the fossils shows that eukaryotes had evolved most cytological and molecular complexities very early in the Proterozoic but environmental conditions delayed their diversification within clades until oxygen level and predation pressure increased significantly. [less ▲]

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See detailAstrobiology : origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe.
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in CAPAS comptes-rendus (2007)

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See detailAstrobiology and Habitability workshop, Abstracts and Program, June 13th 2006 Brussels SCKCEN headquarters
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Mergeay, Max; Dehant, Véronique

Book (2006)

Astrobiology and Habitability workshop, Abstracts and Program, June 13th 2006 Brussels SCKCEN headquarters

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See detailEarly life evolution, habitats and biosignatures. Astrobiology and Habitability workshop
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Marshall, Craig

Conference (2006, June)

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See detailCriteria for biogenicity of morphological signatures
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2006, April)

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See detailThe astrobiology primer: An outline of general knowledge - Version 1, 2006
Mix, Lucas J; Armstrong, John C; Mandell, Avi M et al

in Astrobiology (2006), 6(5), 735-813

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See detailA new approach in deciphering early protist paleobiology and evolution: Combined microscopy and microchemistry of single Proterozoic acritarchs
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Marshal, C. P.

in Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology (2006), 139(1-4), 1-15

Beside a few cases, the biological affinities of Proterozoic and Paleozoic acritarchs remain, by definition, largely unknown. However, these fossils record crucial steps in the early evolution of ... [more ▼]

Beside a few cases, the biological affinities of Proterozoic and Paleozoic acritarchs remain, by definition, largely unknown. However, these fossils record crucial steps in the early evolution of microorganisms and diversification of complex ecosystems. We present how combining microscopy (light microscopy, scanning and transmitted electron microscopy) with microchemical analyses of individual microfossils may offer further insights into the paleobiology and evolution of early microorganisms. We use our ongoing work on early Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic assemblages, as well as other published work, as examples to illustrate how this approach may clarify the evolution of early microorganisms and we underline how useful this approach could be for palynologists working on younger material. Such a multidisciplinary approach offers new possibilities to investigate the biological affinities of acritarchs and the record of early life on Earth and beyond. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological innovations and diversification of early eukaryotes
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2006)

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See detailPatterns of early eukaryote diversification
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2006)

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See detailAn astrobiology QUIZZ: How to recognize extraterrestrial life?
Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Alekina, I.; Benzerara, K. et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailBiomarqueurs et Biosignatures: synthèse de l'Atelier de Dourdan 22-24 Mars 2006
Vandenabeele-Trambouze; Alekina, I.; Benzerara, K. et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailEvolution of early eukaryotes
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Scientific conference (2006)

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See detailBiosignatures morphologiques: quelques pistes de réflexion
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2006)

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See detailExtreme life on Earth - past, present and possibly beyond
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Research in Microbiology (2006), 157(1), 37-48

Life may have been present on Earth since about 3.8 billion years ago or earlier. Multidisciplinary research, especially on the paleobiology and evolution of early microorganisms on Earth and the ... [more ▼]

Life may have been present on Earth since about 3.8 billion years ago or earlier. Multidisciplinary research, especially on the paleobiology and evolution of early microorganisms on Earth and the microbiology of extremophiles in the Earth's environments and under space conditions, enables the defining of strategies for the detection of potential extraterrestrial life by determining biosignatures and the environmental envelope of life. (C) 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe early eukaryote fossil record
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Jékely, Gáspár (Ed.) Evolution of the Eukaryotic Endomembrane System and Cytoskeleton (2006)

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See detailEléments de paléontologie
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Learning material (2006)

powerpoint sur MyULg

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See detailA la recherche de la vie dans l’univers
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2006)

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See detaill'astrobiologie: origine, évolution et distribution de la vie dans l'univers
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2006)

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