References of "Jauniaux, Thierry"
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See detailThe harbor seal and the harbor porpoise from the North Sea: review of their ecotoxicological status based on stranded and free-ranging individuals and potential threaths to the population
Das, Krishna ULg; Weijs, Liesbeth; Habran, Sarah ULg et al

Conference (2011, May)

The harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) from the North Sea have experienced major fluctuations these last decades due to habitat loss, prey fluctuation and pollution ... [more ▼]

The harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) from the North Sea have experienced major fluctuations these last decades due to habitat loss, prey fluctuation and pollution of the marine environment. Recently, development of monitoring programs and non-invasive sampling techniques, including seal catches in Germany allowed blood sampling together with measurements of blubber thickness, body mass, sex and body length. This approach is complementary to the study of stranded and by-caught individuals sampled during necropsies. Essential (Se, Zn, Cu, Fe) and non-essential elements (T-Hg, MeHg, Cd, Pb), perfluorinated organochemicals (PFCs) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in blubber and in blood (for selected compounds) of stranded, by-caught and free-ranging individuals from Belgian and German coasts. In contrast to Cd and Pb, hepatic T-Hg can reach concentrations as high as 2.1 μg.g-1 dry weight but depended on several factors including position in the trophic chain (inferred from δ13C and δ15N values), age group and the body mass. This level has been shown to generate in vitro toxicity on harbor seal lymphocytes. Organic compound analysis (PFCs, PCBs, PBDEs) revealed widespread dispersion of contaminants in the marine environment with higher concentrations in seals compared to porpoises in agreement with the higher trophic position of the harbor seal. However, metabolization of these compounds differed between the two species, as revealed by the higher contribution of the persistent BDE-47 and lower chlorinated and non-persistent congeners (e.g. CB 52, CB95) in tissues of harbor porpoises. T-Hg, PFCs, PCBs and PBDEs were detected in calves confirming maternal transfer to offspring. These pollutants are strongly suspected to affect the immune and endocrine systems as well as vitamin A metabolism and this raises concern about exposure-related health effects, especially in younger individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailNew evidence of a relationship between PCB and the cause of death of North Sea harbour porpoises
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Haelters, Jan et al

in proceeding of the annual conference (2011)

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See detailProceedings of the 1st Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium)
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg; Frippiat, Thibault ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2011)

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See detailCytochrome P450 1A1 expression in cetacean skin biopsies from the Indian Ocean
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg; Fontaine, Michael et al

in Marine Pollution Bulletin (2011)

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See detailPigeon circovirus: baculovirus expression of the capsid protein gene, specific antibody and viral load measured by real time polymerase chain reaction
Duchatel, Jean-Pierre ULg; Todd, D.; Smyth, J. et al

in Israel Journal of Veterinary Medicine (2011), 66(1), 26-31

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See detailThe Belgian Marine Mammals Network
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; De Cauwer, Karine; Jacques, Thierry et al

in Interest and feasibility of a web-accessed database for marine mammals strandings and necropsy data in the ASCOBANS région, ECS workshopy (2011)

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, Cecile; Fretin, David et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 139(11), 254-7

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See detailAspects of population biology: Epizootics in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina): clinical aspects
Siebert, Ursula; Gulland, Frances; Harder, Timm et al

in Desportes, G.; Bjorge, A.; Rosing-Avid, A. (Eds.) et al Harbour seals in the North Atlantic and the Baltic (2010)

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See detailGenetic and historic evidence for climate-driven population fragmentation in a top cetacean predator: the harbour porpoises in European water.
Fontaine, Michaël C. ULg; Tolley, Krystal A.; Michaux, Johan ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2010), 277(1695), 2829-37

Recent climate change has triggered profound reorganization in northeast Atlantic ecosystems, with substantial impact on the distribution of marine assemblages from plankton to fishes. However, assessing ... [more ▼]

Recent climate change has triggered profound reorganization in northeast Atlantic ecosystems, with substantial impact on the distribution of marine assemblages from plankton to fishes. However, assessing the repercussions on apex marine predators remains a challenging issue, especially for pelagic species. In this study, we use Bayesian coalescent modelling of microsatellite variation to track the population demographic history of one of the smallest temperate cetaceans, the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in European waters. Combining genetic inferences with palaeo-oceanographic and historical records provides strong evidence that populations of harbour porpoises have responded markedly to the recent climate-driven reorganization in the eastern North Atlantic food web. This response includes the isolation of porpoises in Iberian waters from those further north only approximately 300 years ago with a predominant northward migration, contemporaneous with the warming trend underway since the 'Little Ice Age' period and with the ongoing retreat of cold-water fishes from the Bay of Biscay. The extinction or exodus of harbour porpoises from the Mediterranean Sea (leaving an isolated relict population in the Black Sea) has lacked a coherent explanation. The present results suggest that the fragmentation of harbour distribution range in the Mediterranean Sea was triggered during the warm 'Mid-Holocene Optimum' period (approx. 5000 years ago), by the end of the post-glacial nutrient-rich 'Sapropel' conditions that prevailed before that time. [less ▲]

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See detailPotential research on marine mammals
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Coignoul, Freddy ULg

in Animal inside and outside the laboratory (2010)

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

in 9th Conference of European Wildlife Diseases Association (2010)

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See detailConcentrations of chlorinated and brominated contaminants and their metabolites in serum of harbour seals and harbour porpoises
Weijs, Liesbeth; Das, Krishna ULg; Siebert, Ursula et al

in Environment International (2009), 35(6), 842-850

Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are top predators in the North Sea and consequently accumulate a variety of pollutants in their tissues. Concentrations of ... [more ▼]

Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are top predators in the North Sea and consequently accumulate a variety of pollutants in their tissues. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their hydroxylated metabolites (HO-PCBs and HO-PBDEs) were measured in serum of wild harbour seals (n=47) and captive harbour porpoises (n=21). Both species exhibit long life spans and do not have extreme situations, such as complete fasting during periods of lactation, in their annual cycles. For PCBs, concentrations in adult males were slightly higher than in juveniles and lowest in juvenile females. For PBDEs, juveniles have higher levels than adult males and females, probably as a consequence of lactational transfer. However. differences between these age-gender groups were not statistical significant, indicating that individual variation was limited within each species, even without knowing the feeding status of the animals. Body condition. particularly emaciation, has a major influence on the levels of chlorinated and brominated contaminants in serum. Profiles of PCBs were CB 153>CB 138>CB 187>CB 180 and CB 153>CB 138>CB 149>CB 187>CB 180 for harbour seals and porpoises respectively. For PBDEs, BDE 47 was the predominant congener followed by BDE 100 and 99 in both species. In harbour seals, concentrations of sum PCBs (median: 39,200 pg/ml) were more than 200 times higher than levels of sum PBDEs (median: 130 pg/ml) and almost 10 times higher than concentrations of sum HO-PCBs (4350 pg/ml). In harbour porpoises, concentrations of sum PCBs (median: 24,300 pg/ml) were about 20 times higher than concentrations of PBDEs (median: 1300 pg/ml). HO-PCBs were detected in only 4 harbour porpoises and this at very low concentrations. Naturally-produced MeO-PBDEs were only found in harbour porpoises at concentrations ranging from 120 to 810 pg/ml. HO-PBDEs were not found in any species. In general, harbour seals accumulate less compounds and have mostly lower concentrations than harbour porpoises possibly as a result of a better developed metabolism. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Belgian Marine Mammal Biobank: a tool to stimulate tissue exchange
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; De Cauwer, Karien; De Winter, Johan et al

in Annual report (2009)

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See detailDecalcifying odontocete ears following a routine protocol with RDO (R)
Morell, M.; Degollada, E.; Alonso, J. M. et al

in Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology (2009), 376(2), 55-58

The study of the organ of Corti is essential to assess the impact of underwater noise on cetaceans. While classical histology techniques (including EDTA decalcification) have been previously considered ... [more ▼]

The study of the organ of Corti is essential to assess the impact of underwater noise on cetaceans. While classical histology techniques (including EDTA decalcification) have been previously considered, the process is time consuming. Independently from the histological technique, one of the challenging steps after extraction and fixation of the samples is to decalcify the bone envelope to access the cochlea without damaging the soft tissues. Here, we propose to use a fast commercial decalcifier (RDO (R)). 93 ears from 11 different odontocetes species stranded in the Mediterranean, Spanish North Atlantic and North Sea were used to precisely determine the decalcification time. Depending on the tympanic-periotic volume of the species, the decalcification time ranged from several hours to a few days, allowing a subsequently faster observation of the cochlear structures through routine microscope techniques. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCauses of death of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded on the coasts of Belgium and Northern France
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Stekke, V.; Coignoul, Freddy ULg

in Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. Veterinary Medicine (2009), 66(2), 392

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