References of "Hustinx, Roland"
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See detailPET imaging in lung cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Valk, Peter E.; Delbeke, Dominique; Bailey, Dale L. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography (2006)

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See detailPET and PET/CT imaging in lymphomas.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg

in Valk, Peter E.; Delbeke, Dominique; Bailey, Dale L. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography (2006)

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See detailThe lymphomas. Nuclear Medicine
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Canellos, George P.; Lister, Andrew T.; Young, Brian (Eds.) The lymphomas. (2006)

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See detailSequential positron emission tomography using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose for monitoring response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.
Couturier, Olivier; Jerusalem, Guy ULg; N'Guyen, Jean-Michel et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2006), 12(21), 6437-43

PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Twenty patients with hormonorefractory or ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Twenty patients with hormonorefractory or hormonoreceptor-negative multimetastatic breast cancer were prospectively included. PET studies were done at baseline, at day 21 after the first cycle and at day 21 after the third cycle of chemotherapy. Metabolic response was defined based on visual and various modes of standardized uptake value (SUV) analysis of sequential PET studies. RESULTS: After one cycle, PET indicated a partial response in 12 patients, stable disease in 7 patients, and progressive disease in 1 patient, according to the visual analysis. After three cycles, PET showed a complete response in 5 patients, partial response in 11 patients, stable disease in 3 patients, and progressive disease in 1 patient. Seventy-five percent of the patients showing a metabolic response on visual analysis effectively responded to the treatment. The average SUV decreased on both the second and the third PET study, but only changes measured after three cycles of chemotherapy predicted the clinical response to chemotherapy and the overall survival. All methods for calculating the SUV (normalized for body weight, body surface area, or lean body mass) provided similar results. CONCLUSION: Semiquantitative analysis of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET studies done after three cycles of chemotherapy is useful for monitoring the response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailIntratissular Lymphaticovenous Anastomoses Demonstrated by Perioperative Intramuscular Injection of 99mtc-Colloids
Heymans, Olivier; Fallais, Charles ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Lymphatic Research and Biology (2006), 4(1, Spring), 29-33

BACKGROUND: The existence of intratissular lymphaticovenous anastomoses has often been suggested, but it has never been demonstrated. This study aims at demonstrating the presence of such anastomoses ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The existence of intratissular lymphaticovenous anastomoses has often been suggested, but it has never been demonstrated. This study aims at demonstrating the presence of such anastomoses. METHODS AND RESULTS: The free flap model was used to investigate the drainage of radiolabeled colloid particles whose size prevents direct passage to the blood vessels. The tracer was injected into the muscle or the skin during the surgical procedure. Blood samples were sequentially drawn from the venous pedicle over the 30 minutes that followed the tracer injection. The blood samples were counted using a gamma well-counter. In all 14 patients, the venous blood radioactivity steadily increased over time. Radiochemical analyses performed on the blood samples demonstrated that the radioactivity is related to the labeled colloids and not to free pertechnetate. Planar imaging performed 24 hours after the surgical procedure showed a significant liver uptake, and no accumulation in the area of normal lymphatic relays. CONCLUSIONS: As, in the free flap model, there is no lymphatic drainage through the classical pathways whatsoever, and since the size of the radiolabeled particles prevents them from directly entering the blood stream, the results strongly suggest the presence of functional intratissular lymphovenous anastomoses. [less ▲]

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See detailIs 3 '-deoxy-3 '-[F-18] fluorothymidine ([F-18]-FLT) the next tracer for routine clinical PET after R [F-18]-FDG?
Couturier, Olivier; Léost, Françoise; Campone, Mario et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2005), 92(9), 789-798

Positron emission tomography (PET) with {F-18}-FDG is nowfirmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) with {F-18}-FDG is nowfirmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its uptake mechanism for tumors, or the low avidity of some cancer types such as prostate. Alternative tracers are thus being developed, in order to fill up this void. Proliferation as a biological target is particularly attractive in cancer imaging. From that perspective, fluorothymidine ({F-18}-FLT or FLT) has generated a strong interest among the scientific community, especially since the radiosynthesis process has been improved and simplified, thus making possible to envision a routine use for the tracer. This article aims at summarizing the status of the current scientific data regarding FLT The uptake mechanism of FLT is well known, relying on the thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) enzymatic activity, and thus on DNA synthesis, Preclinical studies have shown a clear relationship between tracer accumulation and level of tumor proliferation, even though DNA salvage pathwayss intervene in the process and may complicate the interpretation of the results. Several clinical studies suggest a good specificity for tumor, albeit with a lower sensitivity than with FDG. In all likelihood however, the future of FLT lies in the evaluation of antitumor response and possibly the pretherapeutic prognostic characterization, rather than in the diagnosis and staging of malignancies. Although the scientific data regarding this issue remain limited, initial results are encouraging. Further significant work remains to he done in order to fully assess the clinical performances of the tracer, on the one hand, and to determine its place relative to FDG and other emerging tracers, on the other hand. Until these studies are completed, FLT should he considered as a promising tracer, hut remaining at an experimental stage of its development. [less ▲]

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See detailDistribution of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) in abdominal aortic aneurysm: High accumulation in macrophages seen on PET Imaging and immunohistology
Defawe, O. D.; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg et al

in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (2005), 30(5), 340-341

A 68-year-old man was hospitalized for unstable angina and underwent emergency coronary artery bypass surgery. During the operation, a pulsatile large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered. To ... [more ▼]

A 68-year-old man was hospitalized for unstable angina and underwent emergency coronary artery bypass surgery. During the operation, a pulsatile large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered. To define the optimal treatment of the abdominal aneurysm, after bypass surgery, CT scans and positron emission tomography (PET) were performed, as we routinely do. PET imaging combined with immunohistologic examination showed a region of increased F-18 FDG uptake corresponding to an inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic wall in contrast to the thrombus in the aneurysm (devoid of inflammatory cells). The luminal area showed midlevel F-18 FDG uptake corresponding to circulating mediators. [less ▲]

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See detailF-18-FDG PET in children with lymphomas
Depas, Gisèle ULg; De Barsy, Caroline; Jerusalem, Guy ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2005), 32(1), 31-38

Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Methods: Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n= 11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. Results: At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). Conclusion: F-18-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. [less ▲]

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See detailPET imaging for differentiating recurrent brain tumor from radiation necrosis
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Pourdehnad, M.; Kaschten, Bruno ULg et al

in Radiologic Clinics of North America (2005), 43(1), 35-47

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See detailEvaluation of therapy for lymphoma.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Seminars in Nuclear Medicine (2005), 35(3), 186-96

Positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is the best noninvasive imaging technique for to assess response in patients suffering from lymphoma. Early response ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is the best noninvasive imaging technique for to assess response in patients suffering from lymphoma. Early response evaluation ("interim PET") after one, a few cycles, or at midtreatment can predict response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. We calculated from data of 7 studies an overall sensitivity to predict treatment failure of 79%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 90%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 81%, and an accuracy of 85%. Although it is not yet indicated to change patient management based on residual (18)F-FDG uptake on interim scan in chemotherapy-sensitive patients, prospective studies evaluating the role of an interim PET in patient management clearly are warranted. (18)F-FDG PET also has an important prognostic role in relapsing patients after reinduction chemotherapy before high-dose chemotherapy (HCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). However, all chemotherapy-sensitive patients remain candidates for HCT followed by ASCT, even if (18)F-FDG PET showed residual (18)F-FDG uptake. We calculated from data of 3 studies an overestimated risk of relapse in 16% of all PET-positive patients. Some patients with residual (18)F-FDG uptake will have a good outcome after HCT followed by ASCT. (18)F-FDG PET is the imaging technique of choice for end-of-treatment evaluation. However, (18)F-FDG is not specific for tumoral tissue. Active inflammatory lesions and infectious processes can be falsely interpreted as malignant residual cells. However, a negative (18)F-FDG PET cannot exclude minimal residual disease. Consequently, it is always indicated to correlate PET findings with clinical data, other imaging modalities, and/or a biopsy. We calculated, from data of 17 studies in end-of-treatment evaluation, a sensitivity of 76%, a specificity of 94%, a PPV of 82%, a NPV 92%, and an accuracy of 89%. [less ▲]

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See detailPositron emission tomography imaging for lymphoma.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Current Opinion in Oncology (2005), 17(5), 441-5

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the current role and the limitations of F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography in the management of lymphoma, with a particular focus on studies published since ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the current role and the limitations of F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography in the management of lymphoma, with a particular focus on studies published since January 2004. RECENT FINDINGS: F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography should be routinely performed at the initial diagnosis of patients with suffering from Hodgkin's disease because it adds useful informations to conventional staging techniques. Residual F-fluorodeoxygenase uptake is an important prognostic factor after one or a few cycles of chemotherapy, but it is clearly too early to change patient treatment on the basis of F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography results. F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography is the best noninvasive imaging technique after treatment; however, it is always indicated to correlate positron emission tomography findings with clinical data, other imaging modalities, a biopsy, or all three to reduce the risk of false positive results. There are some concerns about the positive predictive value of positron emission tomography after treatment, especially in childhood lymphoma. Clinicians should be aware of positron emission tomography findings in specific clinical conditions in this patient population. F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography offers advantages over the two used separately and read side by side. It may be particularly useful for the planning of radiation therapy or for the planning of a surgical biopsy. Several studies have shown that F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography is definitively superior to Ga scintigraphy. New radiotracers such as F-fluorothymidine may be useful for the noninvasive assessment of proliferation in vivo. SUMMARY: F-fluorodeoxygenase positron emission tomography has become the most important nuclear medicine imaging modality in the field of lymphoma. It should be routinely used in the treatment of lymphoma patients. [less ▲]

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See detailL'image du mois. Mise en evidence d'une metastase intracanalaire rachidienne d'un carcinome pulmonaire par TEP/TDM
Ancion, Geoffrey; Foidart-Willems, J.; Willems, V. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2005), 60(7-8, Jul-Aug), 637-8

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See detailWhole-Body Positron Emission Tomography using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose for Staging Response Assessment in Hodgkin's Disease
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Heinz, Beverley C. (Ed.) Trends in Hodgkin's Disease Research (2005)

Hodgkin's disease, sometimes called Hodgkin's lymphoma, is a cancer that starts in lymphatic tissue. Lymphatic tissue includes the lymph nodes and related organs that are part of the body's immune and ... [more ▼]

Hodgkin's disease, sometimes called Hodgkin's lymphoma, is a cancer that starts in lymphatic tissue. Lymphatic tissue includes the lymph nodes and related organs that are part of the body's immune and blood-forming systems. The lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs found underneath the skin in the neck, underarm, and groin. They are also found in many other places in the body such as inside the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Lymph nodes make and store infection-fighting white blood cells, called lymphocytes. They are connected throughout the body by lymph vessels (narrow tubes similar to blood vessels). These lymph vessels carry a colourless, watery fluid (lymphatic fluid) that contains lymphocytes. Eventually the lymphatic fluid is emptied into the blood vessels in the left upper chest. There are 5 different types of Hodgkin's lymphoma: Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma; Mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma; Lymphocyte depletion Hodgkin's lymphoma; Lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin's lymphoma; Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma. This volume examines and presents leading-edge research in this field. Preface; What Causes Hodgkin’s Disease? A Review of Analytical Epidemiology; Progress in Hodgkin’s Disease Research; New Insights in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Disease; Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Infection; Roles of CD30 Signal Transduction in the Biology of Classic Hodgkin’s Lymphoma; Whole-Body Positron Emission Tomography Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose for Staging and Response Assessment in Hodgkin’s Disease; The Clinical Value of Nuclear Medicine in the Assessment of Radio-and Chemotherapy Related Pulmonary and Cardiac Normal Tissue Damage in Patients with Hodgkin’s Disease; Cell Fusion and Carcinogenesis. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg Cells as Paradigm of Cell Fusion and Cell Cancerisation; Existential and Psychosocial Issues for Hodgkin’s Disease Survivors; Index. [less ▲]

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See detailLa 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F] fluorothymidine ([18F]-FLT) est-elle le prochain traceur utilise en routine pour la TEP apres le [18F]-FDG?
Couturier, Olivier; Leost, Francoise; Campone, Mario et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2005), 92(9), 789-98

Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG is now firmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG is now firmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its uptake mechanism for tumors, or the low avidity of some cancer types such as prostate. Alternative tracers are thus being developed, in order to fill up this void. Proliferation as a biological target is particularly attractive in cancer imaging. From that perspective, fluorothymidine ([18F]-FLT or FLT) has generated a strong interest among the scientific community, especially since the radiosynthesis process has been improved and simplified, thus making possible to envision a routine use for the tracer. This article aims at summarizing the status of the current scientific data regarding FLT. The uptake mechanism of FLT is well known, relying on the thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) enzymatic activity, and thus on DNA synthesis. Preclinical studies have shown a clear relationship between tracer accumulation and level of tumor proliferation, even though DNA salvage pathwayss intervene in the process and may complicate the interpretation of the results. Several clinical studies suggest a good specificity for tumor, albeit with a lower sensitivity than with FDG. In all likelihood however, the future of FLT lies in the evaluation of antitumor response and possibly the pretherapeutic prognostic characterization, rather than in the diagnosis and staging of malignancies. Although the scientific data regarding this issue remain limited, initial results are encouraging. Further significant work remains to be done in order to fully assess the clinical performances of the tracer, on the one hand, and to determine its place relative to FDG and other emerging tracers, on the other hand. Until these studies are completed, FLT should be considered as a promising tracer, but remaining at an experimental stage of its development. [less ▲]

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See detailPET imaging in assessing gastrointestinal tumors
Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Radiologic Clinics of North America (2004), 42(6), 1123

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See detailFluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated tracers of gene expression for positron emission tomography
Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-François; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Bulletin du Cancer (2004), 91(9), 695-703

F-18-FDG is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine 18 is considered as the ideal radioisotope for PET, thanks to a low positron energy ... [more ▼]

F-18-FDG is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine 18 is considered as the ideal radioisotope for PET, thanks to a low positron energy, which not only limits the dose rate to the patients but also provides high-resolution images. Furthermore, the 110 min. physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site, and imaging protocols that could span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessing metabolic processes that may be fairly slow Recently, synthesis of fluorinated tracers from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabeling of biomolecules, has given a boost to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers, Given the wide availability of fluorine 18, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated radiotracers of gene expression recently developed and under investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography
Couturier, Olivier; Luxen, André ULg; Chatal, Jean-François et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2004), 31(8), 1182-1206

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET ... [more ▼]

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes "generalist" tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of "specific" tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell hypoxia or bone metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis with F-18-FDG PET
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Ribbens, Clio ULg; Andre, Béatrice ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(6), 956-964

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters with clinical, biologic, and sonographic (US) rheumatoid parameters. Methods: Three hundred fifty-six joints were assessed in 21 patients with active RA: the knees in all subjects and either wrists as well as metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in 13 patients, or ankles and the first metatarsophalangeal joints in the remaining 8 patients. PET analysis consisted of a visual identification of F-18-FDG uptake in the synovium and measurements of standardized uptake values (SUVs). Independent assessors performed the clinical and US examinations. Results: PET positivity was found in 63% of joints, whereas 75%, 79%, and 56% were positive for swelling, tenderness, and US analysis, respectively. Both the rate of PET-positive joints and the SUV increased with the number of positive parameters present (swelling, tenderness, US positivity) and with the synovial thickness. The mean SUV was significantly higher in joints where a power Doppler signal was found. In a global PET analysis, the number of PET-positive joints and the cumulative SUV were significantly correlated with the swollen and tender joint counts, the patient and physician global assessments, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein serum levels, the disease activity score and the simplified disease activity index, the number of US-positive joints, and the cumulative synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique that can assess the metabolic activity of synovitis and measure the disease activity in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of Pet Scanning to the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Sakalihasan, Natzi ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Limet, Raymond ULg

in Seminars in Vascular Surgery (2004), 17(2), 144-53

The size of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is the most usual predictor of the risk for rupture. Because chronic metalloproteinases production and activation by inflammatory cells causes degradation of ... [more ▼]

The size of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is the most usual predictor of the risk for rupture. Because chronic metalloproteinases production and activation by inflammatory cells causes degradation of elastin and collagen in the aneurysmal wall, the detection of an increased metabolic process preceding fissuration and rupture could be a more sensitive predictor of rupture risk. We investigated the metabolic activity of the aneurysmal wall by whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) in 26 patients with a documented AAA (mean diameter 63 mm, extremes 45 mm and 78 mm). A positive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake at the level of the AAA was observed in 38% of the cases (10 of 26 patients). Nine of these 10 patients required emergent or urgent aneurysmectomy for ruptured (n = 1), leaking (n = 1), rapidly expanding (n = 2), or painful (n = 5) aneurysms; the negative (18)F-FDG uptake patients had a more benign course. This preliminary study suggests a possible correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake by the aneurysm wall and the triggering of processes leading to rupture. The (18)F-FDG uptake in the aneurysm wall may correspond to the accumulation of inflammatory cells responsible for the production and activation of degrading enzymes. PET scan seems useful in high-risk patients. Positive PET imaging in these cases would help us to decide to proceed with surgery, despite factors favoring a surveillance strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailWithin-patient variability of F-18-FDG: Standardized uptake values in normal tissues
Paquet, Nancy; Albert, Adelin ULg; Willems, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(5), 784-788

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were determined in 70 cancer-free patients (40 female and 30 male) on 2 occasions an average of 271 d apart. Mean values for body weight and height, blood glucose level, injected dose, and uptake period did not change between the 2 groups of studies. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were placed-on the liver, lung, mediastinum, and trapezius muscle. Mean and maximum SUVs normalized for body weight were obtained, and normalizations were then applied for lean body mass (LBM), LBM and blood glucose level, body surface area (BSA), and BSA and blood glucose level. Results: In the lungs and muscle, metabolic activity within the ROIs was significantly different in the 2 studies, no matter which method was used for the SUVs. The differences ranged from 0.02 to 0.1 for SUV normalized for body weight and SUV normalized for LBM and from 0.001 to 0.002 for SUV normalized for BSA. In the liver, results were similar for all SUVs, except for maximum SUV corrected for LBM and maximum SUV corrected for LBM and blood glucose level. The metabolic activity measured in the mediastinum was also comparable in the 2 studies, regardless of the type of SUV. When investigating whether any normalization method for SUVs reduces variability and improves test-retest concordance, we found no significant superiority for any. The best intraclass correlation coefficients were obtained with the SUV normalized for body weight, in both the liver and the mediastinum, but the coefficients of variation were similar for all 3 mean SUVs that were not corrected for glucose level (range, 10.8%-13.4%). However, normalizing for blood glucose level increased the variability and decreased the level of concordance between studies. Conclusion: The SUVs measured in normal liver and mediastinum in cancer-free patients are stable over time, no matter which normalization is used. Correcting for blood glucose level increases the variability of the values and should therefore be avoided. Normalizing for BSA or LBM does not improve the reproducibility of the measurements. [less ▲]

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