References of "Hubert, Aurelia"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailTurbiditic sedimentary record in the different basins of the Sea of Marmara
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Drab, Laureen; Schmidt, Sabine et al

Conference (2011, June 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
See detailPotentiel de la paleosismologie marine
Beck, Christian; Hubert, Aurelia ULg

Scientific conference (2011, February 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCenozoic Structure and Tectonic Evolution of the Kuqa Foldbelt, southern Tianshan, China
Wang, X.; Suppe, J.; Guan, S. et al

in American Association of Petroleum Geologists Memoir (2011), 94

The east–west-trending late Cenozoic Kuqa fold belt is a part of the compressive southern margin of the Tianshan Mountains in western China. Approximately 20,000 km (12,000 mi) of two-dimensional seismic ... [more ▼]

The east–west-trending late Cenozoic Kuqa fold belt is a part of the compressive southern margin of the Tianshan Mountains in western China. Approximately 20,000 km (12,000 mi) of two-dimensional seismic reflection profiles are integrated with surface geology and well data to examine the deformation style and structural evolution of the Kuqa fold belt. Mesozoic through Holocene strata in the northern Tarim Basin have been deformed in a thrust system that roots northward into the Paleozoic basement of the southern Tianshan. The south-vergent deformation is characterized by a series of forward-breaking thrust faults, fault-related folds, and detachment folds. Two major decollement levels exist: an upper detachment in salt-gypsum lithologies in the Paleogene–Miocene Kumgeliem, Suweiyi, and Jidike formations, and the lower detachment mostly within Jurassic coal and mudstone strata. Fault-propagation folds developed above both detachments and have been refolded in some cases by displacement on the lower thrust faults. Imbricate thrust faults and duplex structures linking the two detach- ments developed with salt that apparently flowed into the cores of the duplex structure. Near the high Tianshan mountain front, Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are involved in deformation that began at approximately 25–26 Ma as documented by growth strata north of Kuqa. To- ward the southward limit of the fold belt, Miocene through Holocene strata are folded in the Quilitage and Yaken anticlines, which began growing above a thrust system that propagated at about 5.5 Ma. The Yaken anticline at the south edge of the eastern Kuqa fold belt has only emerged as a topographic anticline in the last 0.2 – 0.3 Ma associated with an acceleration of the Quilitage-Yaken thrust system. Structural restoration suggests a shortening of 15–20 km (9– 12 mi) across the eastern Kuqa fold belt. Considering that this shortening began about 25 Ma, the average shortening rate was about 0.7 mm/yr (0.03 in./yr). Because the frontal thrust system underlying the Quilitage and Yaken anticlines has a shortening of 6 km (3.7 mi) that began approximately 5.5 Ma, their average shortening rate is about 1.1 mm/yr (0.04 in./yr). However, the shortening rate on this frontal system from about 5.5 Ma to about 0.2–0.3 Ma is approximately 0.6 mm/yr (0.02 in./yr) followed by an acceleration to about 4–5 mm/yr (0.16–0.19 in./yr) at approximately 0.2–0.3 Ma, causing the topographic emergence of these structures. These results indicate that shortening rates in the Kuqa fold belt have increased in the late Pleistocene, which is consistent with more regional present-day geodetic shortening rates of about 9 mm/yr (0.35 in./yr) across the southern Tianshan, which also indicate a substantial acceleration relative to Neogene shortening rates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEvolution of the Kızılırmak river and its interaction with the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey
Drab, Laureen; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Benedetti, Lucilla et al

in AGU Abstract (2010, December)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLong-term evolution of the North Anatolian Fault
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Van Der Woerd, Jerome; King, G. et al

in Abstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSedimentological fingerprints of paleoseimic activity revealed from lake sediments: a case study from the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), Turkey
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Fagel, Nathalie ULg et al

in Abstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAn integrated history of paleoearthquakes along the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey)
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Vanneste, Kriss; Avsar, U.

in Abstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe 2500 yr long paleoseismological record of the Hazar Lake, East Anatolian fault, Turkey
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Vanneste, K.; Cagatay, N et al

Conference (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA relict sedimentary record of seven earthquakes between 600 AD and 2000 BC on the central North Anatolian Fault at Elmacik, near Osmancik, Turkey
Fraser, J.; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Vanneste, K. et al

in Geological Society of America Bulletin (2010), 122(11-12), 1830-1845

Deformation along the northern edge of the westward-moving Anatolian plate is concentrated along the North Anatolian fault. This northward-arching fault extends from the Karliova triple junction in the ... [more ▼]

Deformation along the northern edge of the westward-moving Anatolian plate is concentrated along the North Anatolian fault. This northward-arching fault extends from the Karliova triple junction in the east, ∼1500 km into the Aegean Sea in the west. A sequence of twentieth-century earthquakes ruptured the fault, displaying a spatiotemporal pattern consistent with a stress triggering mechanism. In 1943, the Mw 7.6 Tosya earthquake ruptured a 280-km-long segment near the center of the fault. Four paleoseismic investigations have previously investigated this segment, and the present study was conducted near its center, in an ∼180-km-long gap between existing studies. A paleoseismic trench revealed a sequence of eight sediment packages abutting a highly developed shear zone. Each of the packages consists of a fine-grained layer overlying a coarse-grained layer. Based on correlation between the age of the base of the coarse-grained layers and existing earthquake records, we infer that the coarse-grained layers were deposited in response to earthquakes because of increased erosion on an adjacent steep slope. The most recent event horizon may correlate to the historical 529 A.D. earthquake. Timing of six older earthquakes is constrained to (2s): 23 B.C.–103 A.D., 609–185 B.C., 971–814 B.C., 1227–968 B.C., 2050–1777 B.C., and 2556–2235 B.C., which correspond to a summed interevent time of 97–912 yr (2s). The earthquake record is relict because the local stream network was incised ca. 1000 A.D., isolating the trench site from its sediment source. A stream near the trench was subsequently offset by 23.5 ± 1.5 m, yielding a right-lateral slip rate of 21.4–25.6 mm/yr and suggesting that the 1943 rupture caused an uncharacteristically small offset. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (8 ULg)
See detailLe risque sismique en Anatolie
Hubert, Aurelia ULg

Scientific conference (2010, June 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe earthquake sedimentary record of the Marmara Sea, Turkey
Drab, Laureen; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Schmidt, Sabine et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStructure and evolution of Lake Hazar pull-apart Basin along the East Anatolian Fault
Garcia Moreno, D.; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Moernaut, J. et al

in Basin Research (2010)

The Hazar Basin is a 25 km-long, 7 km-wide and 216 m-deep depression located on the central section of the East Anatolian Fault zone (eastern Turkey) and predominantly overlain by Lake Hazar. This basin ... [more ▼]

The Hazar Basin is a 25 km-long, 7 km-wide and 216 m-deep depression located on the central section of the East Anatolian Fault zone (eastern Turkey) and predominantly overlain by Lake Hazar. This basin has been described previously as a pull-apart basin because of its rhombic shape and an apparent fault step-over between the main fault traces situated at the southwestern and northeastern ends of the lake. However, detailed structural investigation beneath Lake Hazar has not been undertaken previously to verify this interpretation. Geophysical and sedimentological data from Lake Hazar were collected during field campaigns in 2006 and 2007. The analysis of this data reveals that the main strand of the East Anatolian Fault (the Master Fault) is continuous across the Hazar Basin, connecting the two segments previously assumed to be the sidewall faults of a pull-apart structure. In the northeastern part of the lake, an asymmetrical subsiding sub-basin, bounded by two major faults, is cross-cut by the Master Fault, which forms a releasing bend within the lake. Comparison of the structure revealed by this study with analogue models produced for transtensional step-overs suggests that the Hazar Basin structure represents a highly evolved pull-apart basin, to the extent that the previous asperity has been bypassed by a linking fault. The absence of a step-over structure at the Hazar Basin means that no significant segmentation boundary is recognised on the East Anatolian Fault between Palu and Sincik. Therefore, this fault segment is capable of causing larger earthquakes than recognised previously. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecent Behavior of the North Anatolian Fault: Insights from an Integrated Paleoseismological Dataset
Fraser, J.; Vanneste, K.; Hubert, Aurelia ULg

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2010), 115(B09316),

The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a right‐lateral plate boundary fault that arcs across northern Turkey for ∼1500 km. Almost the entire fault progressively ruptured in the 20th century, its cascading ... [more ▼]

The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a right‐lateral plate boundary fault that arcs across northern Turkey for ∼1500 km. Almost the entire fault progressively ruptured in the 20th century, its cascading style indicating that stress from one fault rupture triggers fault rupture of adjacent segments. Using published paleoseismic investigations, this study integrates all of the existing information about the timing of paleoearthquakes on the NAF. Paleoseismic investigation data are compiled into a database, and for each site a Bayesian, ordering‐constrained age model is constructed in a consistent framework. Spatial variability of recurrence intervals suggests a spatial pattern in the behavior of earthquakes on the NAF that may correspond to the tectonic provinces within the Anatolian plate. In the west, the shear stress associated with the escaping Anatolian plate interplays with the tensile stress associated with the Aegean extensional province. Along this western transtensional section we recognize short recurrence intervals and switching between the furcated fault strands. The central section of the NAF is translational with little influence of fault‐normal stresses from other tectonic sources. This section tends to rupture in unison or close succession. The eastern section of the NAF is transpressional due to the compressional fault‐normal stress associated with the indenting Arabian plate. Along this section the recurrence intervals are bimodal, which we attribute to variable normal stress, although there are other possible causes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNo earthquake with characteristic slip on the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Fraser, J.; Drab, L. et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2009, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)