References of "Hornick, Jean-Luc"
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See detailSeasonal variations in the crop contents of scavenging Helmeted Guinea Fowls (Numida meleagris, L.) in Parakou (Benin).
Dahouda, M.; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in British Poultry Science (2008), 49(6), 751-9

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging ... [more ▼]

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging diets were measured during the rainy season (November-February) and dry season (March-October) in order to propose supplementation strategies. Ingredients found in crops were identified and allocated into 6 main categories (supplemental feed, seeds, green forages, animal materials, mineral matter and unidentified materials). 2. Mean dry weights of crop contents were significantly higher in the rainy than in the dry season. Amounts and proportions of supplemental feed and seeds were not significantly different between seasons, whereas those of green forage, animal materials and mineral matter were higher in rainy season. Supplemental feed, especially maize and sorghum, was the largest component of the crop content in both seasons. The most represented grass seeds were Panicum maximum (rainy season) and Rottboellia cochinchinensis (dry season). 3. Dietary concentrations of organic matter, non-nitrogen extract and metabolisable energy were higher in the dry season, while mineral concentrations were higher in the rainy season. There were no significant differences between the two seasons in dry matter, crude protein or crude fibre. 4. Scavenging provided insufficient nutrients and energy to allow guinea fowls to be productive. Therefore, more nutritionally balanced supplementary feed would be required during both seasons. [less ▲]

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See detailMilk urea content: effects of environmental parameters and relationships with other milk traits
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Proceedings of the 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailSpelt, an ancient cereal and first pressure linseed oil as ingredients of compound feedstuffs for modern horse feeding.
Fayt, Joseph; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of Animal Physiology & Animal Nutrition (2008), 92(3), 303-9

Spelt is a covered cereal with large glumellas. In experiment 1, it has been compared in terms of chemical composition with barley, oat and maize. Spelt is characterized by rather low protein and ether ... [more ▼]

Spelt is a covered cereal with large glumellas. In experiment 1, it has been compared in terms of chemical composition with barley, oat and maize. Spelt is characterized by rather low protein and ether extract (EE) contents. The neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content of spelt was slightly higher than that of oat but the acid detergent fibre (ADF) content was lower. Two compound feedstuffs were fed along with hay to six horses used in a cross-over design. Both diets were well appreciated by the horses and there were no significant differences in the apparent digestibility coefficients, except for EE which was significantly higher, when oat was included in the compound feedstuff. In experiment 2, first pressure linseed oil was incorporated at a rate of 8% in a control compound feedstuff, where the barley was partly substituted by the oil. The fat content was 9.6% dry matter (DM) in the linseed oil compound feedstuff and 5.4% in the hay-concentrate ration. The inclusion of linseed oil increased the digestibility of DM, EE and NDF of the diet. There were no effects on the post-prandial concentrations of glucose, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) but the insulin concentration was significantly reduced with the linseed oil inclusion. There were significant increases in the plasma concentrations of the total fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), saturated fatty acids (SFA), C18:3 n-3 and C18:2 n-6 and significant reductions in the contents of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), C18:1 n-7 + n-9 and C20:4 n-6. It is concluded that the inclusions of spelt and first pressure linseed oil in compound feed stuff for horse are of interest for modern horse feeding. [less ▲]

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See detailLinseed oil supplementation in diet for horses: Effects on palatability and digestibility
Delobel, Agathe; Fabry, Christophe ULg; Schoonheere, Nicolas ULg et al

in Livestock Science (2008), 116

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See detailComparaison des caractéristiques de production de la pintade locale (Meleagris numida) en station et dans le milieu villageois en zone soudano-guinéenne du Bénin
Dahouda, Mahamadou; Sènou, Marcel; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2008), 20(12),

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups ... [more ▼]

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups were kept either on station under improved management conditions or in rural environment. In rural environment, the birds were divided in two groups. The birds pertaining to the first group were treated against parasitic diseases, whereas those in the second one (control group) received no treatment. Under station conditions, the feed conversion ratio and the daily weight gain were 8.8 and 5.7 g/day respectively. Mean body weight at six months of age were 1151g and 1085g for males and females, respectively. Sexual maturity was reached at 36 weeks of age. For mature hens kept on station, laying rate and the mean egg weight were 37.2% (65% at the peak) and 41.1g respectively. Smothering, stress and pricking were the major constraints to the cloistering of guinea fowl. In rural environment, the mean hatchability rate was 70%. Mortality rate and adult body weight were not significantly different between groups. Mortality rate observed in the rural environment was 50% for both treated or untreated birds. Apart from the parasitic affections, the main causes of mortality were the rain, the predators, the cold and the fragility of chicks. The mean body weight at six months of age is higher for the birds raised under village conditions in comparison to the birds kept on station. [less ▲]

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See detailOrganic selenium providing by selenized fertilisation in grazed grass, grass and maize silage for beef and dairy cows.
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Proceedings of the 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailMilk urea content: effects of environmental parameters and relationships with other milk traits
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Book of abstracts. 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailOrganic selenium providing by selenized fertilisation in grazed grass, grass and maize silage for beef and dairy cows
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Book of abstracts. 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailEssential fatty acids content in beef meat as influenced by crushed, flaked or extruded linseeds
Robaye, Vincent ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in book of abstract of the 59th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2008)

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See detailCarcasses of Belgian Blue double muscle culled cows or growing fattening bulls: essential fatty acids content in 17 meat pieces
Robaye, Vincent ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in book of abstract of the 59th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2008)

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See detailRadioimmunoassay of bovine placental lactogen using recombinant and native preparations: determination of fetal concentrations across gestation
Alvarez-Oxiley, A. V.; Melo de Sousa, Noelita ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2007), 19(7), 877-885

Concentrations of bovine placental lactogen ( bPL) were determined in fetal plasma samples by twelve double-antibody competitive radioimmunoassay systems ( RIA I - XII) based on either recombinant bPL ... [more ▼]

Concentrations of bovine placental lactogen ( bPL) were determined in fetal plasma samples by twelve double-antibody competitive radioimmunoassay systems ( RIA I - XII) based on either recombinant bPL ( non- glycosylated) or native bPL ( glycosylated). Both preparations were used as standard and tracer, and for primary antisera production. The minimum detection limit measured by these RIA varied from 0.02 to 0.6 ng bPLmL(-1). The coefficients of correlation of different bPL RIA systems were up to 90% ( P< 0.0001) when each RIA was tested against the average values of all twelve RIA systems. All developed RIA were used to investigate the incidence of different bPL isoforms in bovine fetal serum samples ( n= 71). Fetal concentrations ranged from 11.8 to 35.7 ng mL(-1) at the third month and from 1.1 to 13.5 ngmL(-1) at the ninth month of gestation. They tended to decrease with advancing gestation. In general, those RIA systems that used recombinant bPL as the standard measured higher values than those using the native bPL preparation. These differences decreased toward the end of gestation ( P< 0.05), suggesting a lower rate of glycosylation. Our results provide evidence of different glycosylated isoforms of bPL in fetal serum at different gestation periods. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of indicators to quantify nitrogen rejections of grazing dairy cows according to fertilisation types
Meura, Stéphane; Lambert, Richard; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg et al

in Permanent and temporary grassland plant, environment and economy; A. De Vliegher and L. Carlier (Eds); Proceedings of 14th symposium of the European Grassland Federation (2007)

Nitrogen (N) rejections are a problem of importance in cattle production. In pasture, the amounts of N rejected by the cattle are large since grass N content exceeds the ‘animals’ requirements. The ... [more ▼]

Nitrogen (N) rejections are a problem of importance in cattle production. In pasture, the amounts of N rejected by the cattle are large since grass N content exceeds the ‘animals’ requirements. The present study aims to quantify, with dairy cows in a rotational system, N rejections from urine. The trial paddocks were fertilized with compost, slurry or mineral N and grazed during 7 days by 35 dairy cows in late lactation. Milk urea concentration was determined in tank milk samples every day. Urine samples were taken from each cow at the 3rd and the 5th day after the entry in the grazing plot. Urine N and creatinin were determined to quantify urine N excretion. These observed values were compared to urine N excretion data obtained from dry matter intake and grass N content. The mean observed urine N excretion of 312 g N day-1 was similar to the mean calculated urine N excretion of 330 g N day-1. The correlation between calculated urinary N excretion and observed urinary N excretion was significant (P<0.001; r2= 22.4%) and the correlation between observed urinary N excretion and milk urea content tended to be significant (P<0.10; r2 =60%). From these data, it appears that urine N excretion prediction can be more precise with tank milk urea than with urine N excretion calculated from N intake. This research has to be continued and to be repeated during other grazing periods and with cows at different lactation periods to validate the results. [less ▲]

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See detailNitrogen balance and nitrate residues in pastures grazed by dairy cows and fertilised with mineral fertiliser, pig slurry or cattle compost
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Meura, Stéphane; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Permanent and temporary grassland plant, environment and economy; A. De Vliegher and L. Carlier (Eds); Proceedings of 14th symposium of the European Grassland Federation (2007)

A code of good practices was established by each European member state according to the nitrate directive. In Belgium, the nitrogen (N) inputs from slurry or compost are limited to 230 kg N/ha in pastures ... [more ▼]

A code of good practices was established by each European member state according to the nitrate directive. In Belgium, the nitrogen (N) inputs from slurry or compost are limited to 230 kg N/ha in pastures. Larger amounts can be applied when a program of additional measurements, including soil nitrates analysis, is followed by the farmer. This trial aims to measure nitrogen balance and soil nitrates in pastures fertilised with mineral nitrogen fertiliser (min N), pig slurry (S) or cattle compost (C). The pastures were grazed by dairy cows and the fertilisation allowed similar efficient N levels. N inputs by fertilisation were different at 169, 170 and 102 kg N/ha in C, S and min N plots respectively. The use of pig slurry and cattle compost as compared with mineral N fertiliser increased N balance and reduced apparent N efficiency. The nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus nutrition indexes, the number of grazing days and the milk yields per ha were not different. The soil nitrate contents were not increased by use of slurry or compost. The overall low nitrate contents suggested a low nitrate leaching with the three types of fertilisation. [less ▲]

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See detailMilk urea content as influenced by geographical area and season in Wallonia
Meura, Stéphane; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Permanent and temporary grassland plant, environment and economy; A. De Vliegher and L. Carlier (Eds); Proceedings of 14th symposium of the European Grassland Federation (2007)

Milk urea concentration is routinely determined in commercial dairy farms along with the official milk analyses carried out on milk samples for the dairies by the “Comité du lait”. The milk urea content ... [more ▼]

Milk urea concentration is routinely determined in commercial dairy farms along with the official milk analyses carried out on milk samples for the dairies by the “Comité du lait”. The milk urea content do not modify milk price but can be useful for the farmers for diet calculation, milk urea content being related to the energy-protein ratio in the diet. The aim of this paper was to study the evolution of the milk urea content according to the months and the areas. Milk urea concentration changed according to the months owing to the diet: the summer diets, mainly composed by grass in many farms, were characterized by higher nitrogen content which as result an increase in milk urea concentration. The geographic areas can also influence milk urea concentration due to dietary difference. For example, in the Hesbaye area, beet and cereals are produced while in the Ardennes, grasslands are dominant. The urea content in milk can be an useful measurement for the diet calculations in order to decrease nitrogen waste and to reduce the feed costs. [less ▲]

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See detailGuinea fowl rearing constraints and flock composition under traditional management in Borgou Department, Benin
Dahouda, Mahamadou; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in Family Poultry (2007), 17(1&2), 3-14

A survey was conducted in Borgou department (northern Benin) to characterize Guinea fowl production systems in rural areas. A questionnaire was administered to 70 Guinea fowl keepers in order to collect ... [more ▼]

A survey was conducted in Borgou department (northern Benin) to characterize Guinea fowl production systems in rural areas. A questionnaire was administered to 70 Guinea fowl keepers in order to collect information about Guinea fowl management and husbandry practices in the region. This activity was practised according to traditional management in Benin where free range is the most common system of rearing. Birds scavenged during the day while at night, keets and surrogate hens were housed in poor, cramped coops whereas adult Guinea fowls roosted on trees. No rational feeding system was practised. Guinea fowls gleaned grass seeds, vegetable leaves, insects, worms, bones and eggshells. Poultry received a supplement consisting of cereals and their by-products, e.g. sorghum (30.4%), maize (25.0%), rice (14.3%), maize bran (7.1%), kitchen waste (5.4%), sorghum bran (3.6%), millet (1.8%) and complete food (1.8%). Adult body weight was 1121.3±100.2g at 6 months and maximum growth rate of 10.2g/day was reached at four months. Point-of-lay was between 7 and 9 months. Local hens were used to incubate Guinea fowl eggs, and hatchability was 72.9%. The survey revealed that Guinea fowl productivity is low because of high keet mortality. Average keet mortality registered from 0 to 6 months was 48% (range 3 to 100%). Moreover, 74% of interviewed farmers reported that keet mortality constituted the major constraint to Guinea fowl rearing. Others reported constraints, included keet weakness, poor quality of eggs, egg losses hidden under brush, keets predation, poor housing and infestations. The size of the keet populations varied over the year with the highest proportion in June-July while the proportion of growers increased from September to January. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferent treatments of linseed of culled cows and young bulls
Robaye, Vincent ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in 58th Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2007)

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See detailInclusion of cereals, hay and straw naturally enriched in selenium by use of fertilizers in horses diets: overtime effects on antioxidant markers
Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Paeffgen, S.; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in 11th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (2007)

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