References of "Hoebeke, Maryse"
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See detailL’enseignement des mathématiques aux non mathématiciens (en faculté de médecine)
Hoebeke, Maryse ULg

Scientific conference (2007, November 12)

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See detail. Study of neuronal cells preconditioning by ESR.
Guelluy, Pierre-Henri ULg; Deby-Dupont; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg

Poster (2007, September)

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See detailDoes propofol alter membrane fluidity at clinically relevant concentrations? An ESR spin label study
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Seret, Alain ULg; Hans, Pol ULg et al

in Biophysical Chemistry (2007), 129(1), 82-91

General anesthetics have been shown to perturb the membrane properties of excitable tissues. Due to their lipid solubility, anesthetics dissolve in every membrane, penetrate into organelles and interact ... [more ▼]

General anesthetics have been shown to perturb the membrane properties of excitable tissues. Due to their lipid solubility, anesthetics dissolve in every membrane, penetrate into organelles and interact with numerous cellular structures in multiple ways. Several studies indicate that anesthetics alter membrane fluidity and decrease the phase-transition temperature. However, the required concentrations to induce such effects on the properties of membrane lipids are by far higher than clinically relevant concentrations. In the present study, the fluidizing effect of the anesthetic agent propofol (2,6-diisopropyl phenol: PPF), a general anesthetic extensively used in clinical practice, has been investigated on liposome dimyristoyi-L-alpha phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cell (erythrocyte, Neuro-2a) membranes using electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) of nitroxide labeled fatty acid probes (5-, 16-doxyl stearic acid). A clear effect of PPF at concentrations higher than the clinically relevant ones was quantified both in liposome and cell membranes, while no evident fluidity effect was measured at the clinical PPF doses. However, absorption spectroscopy of merocyanine 540 (MC540) clearly indicates a PPF fluidizing capacity in liposome membrane even at these clinical concentrations. PPF may locally influence the structure and dynamics of membrane domains, through the formation of small-scale lipid domains, which would explain the lack of ESR information at low PPF concentrations. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detail. Study of Neuronal Preconditioning by ESR
Guelluy, Pierre-Henri ULg; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg

Poster (2007, April)

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See detailInvestigation of SDS, DTAB and CTAB micelle microviscosities by electron spin resonance
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg; Grammenos, Angeliki ULg et al

in Colloids and Surfaces A : Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2006), 290(1-3), 206-212

Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) of the nitroxide labelled fatty acid probes (5-, 16-doxyl stearic acid) was used to monitor the micelle microviscosity of three surfactants at various ... [more ▼]

Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) of the nitroxide labelled fatty acid probes (5-, 16-doxyl stearic acid) was used to monitor the micelle microviscosity of three surfactants at various concentrations in aqueous solution: sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). At low surfactant concentration, there is no micelle, the ESR probe is dissolved in water/surfactant homogeneous phase and gives his microviscosity. At higher surfactant concentration, an abrupt increase in microviscosity indicates the apparition of micelles and, the solubilization of the probes in micelles. The microviscosity of the three surfactants, in a large surfactant range, was obtained as well as the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The microviscosity increased slightly with the increase in surfactant concentration. Phosphate buffer lowered the CMC value and generally increased the microviscosity. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotochemistry of 2,6-diisopropylphenol (propofol)
Heyne, B.; Tfibel, F.; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg et al

in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences (2006), 5(11), 1059-1067

The photochemistry of the anaesthetic agent propofol (PPF) was investigated in three different solvents of quite different polarity (cyclohexane, methanol and phosphate buffer pH 7) by means of nanosecond ... [more ▼]

The photochemistry of the anaesthetic agent propofol (PPF) was investigated in three different solvents of quite different polarity (cyclohexane, methanol and phosphate buffer pH 7) by means of nanosecond laser flash photolysis and absorption spectroscopy. GC-MS spectrometry measurements of PPF in cyclohexane have revealed the formation of two major products upon low intensity UV continuous irradiation of PPF in aerated solution: the diphenol derivative of PPF and 2,6-diisopropyl-p-benzoquinone (PPFQ). Only the diphenol compound was obtained in anaerobic solution. PPF phenoxyl radical (PPF ) generation has been assigned as the original step leading to the formation of both the diphenol compound and PPFQ in cyclohexane as revealed by laser flash photolysis at 266 nm and by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy as well. Investigation of PPF by nanosecond flash photolysis at 266 nm in the other solvents revealed the occurrence of different photochemical processes depending on the nature and the polarity of the solvent. A reaction scheme is proposed in order to discuss the mechanism of reaction of PPF in all media. [less ▲]

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