References of "Hiligsmann, Serge"
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See detailProduction de biohydrogène par fermentation anaérobie chimiotrophe de substrats carbohydratés
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Hydrogen (H2) is being considered as an ideal and clean energy carrier since the utilization of hydrogen, either via combustion or via fuel cells, results in pure water. The recent advances to produce ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen (H2) is being considered as an ideal and clean energy carrier since the utilization of hydrogen, either via combustion or via fuel cells, results in pure water. The recent advances to produce biohydrogen from renewable sources such as biomass and particularly by fermentation of carbohydrate-rich substrates from agriculture and agro-industries appear promising. Such a process called “dark fermentation” enables both organic waste treatment and renewable energy production to be coupled. In the thesis different hydrogen-producing microorganisms were studied and some environmental parameters and bioreactors have been investigated in order to improve the hydrogen production yields and rates. The experimental results compared the hydrogen production yield of 19 different pure strains and sludges : facultative and strict anaerobic H2-producing strains along with anaerobic digester sludges thermally pre-treated (to enrich the microflora in high H2-producers) or not. Significant yields variations were recorded even between different strains of the same species (up to 20% of variation). The pure Clostridium butyricum (C. but.) strains achieved the highest yields i.e. up to 172 L H2 produced per kilogram of glucose consumed (1.38 mol H2 / mol glucose). Two efficient H2-producing strains (C. but. CWBI1009 and Citrobacter freundii CWBI952) were further studied in order to determine the optimum culture conditions for the production of hydrogen. A 2.3 L bioreactor was operated at 30 °C in batch and sequenced-batch mode using glucose and starch as substrates. For glucose the maximum yield (211 L H2 / kg or 1.7 mol H2 / mol glucose) was measured with the C. but. strain when the pH was maintained at 5.2. In sequenced-batch reactor a 35% increase in H2 yield was obtained with removal–addition of 40% of the culture medium at the beginning of each sequence. For operation in continuous mode, original bioreactors such as an anaerobic biodisc reactor (AnBDR) were designed to both fix biomass and enable rapid liquid to gas transfer of hydrogen produced since H2 partial pressure and H2 supersaturation are known as hardly affecting hydrogen production performances. The highest and stable H2 production rate (703 L H2 per hour and per m³ of liquid volume inside the bioreactor) and yield (302 L / kg glucose consumed i.e. 2.4 mol/mol) with the pure culture of C. but. CWBI1009 were recorded in the AnBDR with 300 mL culture medium (total volume 2.3 L) at pH 5.2 and a glucose loading rate of 2.87 kg / m³.h. These results achieved with pure strains are relevant compared to the highest H2 yields and rates reported in the literature with mixed cultures and achieved in reactors, such as trickle bed bioreactors, with high gas transfer performances. Moreover, the soluble metabolites, mainly acetate and butyrate, contained in the spent medium of the dark fermentation bioreactor were efficiently converted to methane in a second anaerobic digester (20 L continuously stirred tank) with a methane yield of about 170 L/kg COD initially fed in the first stage. These results demonstrate that a two-step anaerobic digestion process may be carried out in two successive bioreactors, both with specific and optimized parameters, in order to generate separated biogas flows containing either H2 or CH4. In addition to the advantages related to both gaseous molecule properties, many technological improvements would be achieved by this way : better hydrolysis, higher process stability, etc. The general discussion highlights the central and relevant position of the 2-stage anaerobic digestion process in the panorama of technologies able to both treat raw or residual organic matter and to produce energy or energy vectors for stationary or mobile end-use. The technical, economical and environmental aspects have been considered. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating the factors for fermentative biohydrogen improvement: original bioreactors design and hydrogen partial pressure effect
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

in WHEC 2012, Toronto June 3rd - 7th (2012, June 05)

The anaerobic production of hydrogen from biomass offers the potential production of usable biogas from a variety of renewable resources. However, in order to produce hydrogen at high yields and ... [more ▼]

The anaerobic production of hydrogen from biomass offers the potential production of usable biogas from a variety of renewable resources. However, in order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed [1]. At the CWBI, a continuous horizontal rotating cylinder bioreactor has been designed and investigated to produce biohydrogen from glucose by the strain Clostridium butyricum [2] at good yields (1,9molH2•molglucose-1) and production rates (48,6mmolH2•Lmilieu-1.molhexose-1•h-1). This reactor has an internal volume of 2.3L and a small working volume (300ml) (fig.1). It enhances the hydrogen production rates (by about three times more than a completely stirred bioreactor) by partially immobilizing the bacteria on the porous support. Moreover, the rotating cylinder design enables efficient H2 gas transfer from the liquid phase increasing hydrogen yields by about 25% compared to a completely stirred bioreactor [3-4]. Other original bioreactors, such as a trickle bed, have been built with the same aim of lowering the hydrogen partial pressure and led to similar results. Our work shows the importance of a good liquid to gas transfers in the biohydrogen-producing reactors to reach higher performances. [less ▲]

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See detailThe MicroH2 project:an association of four laboratories to improve theknowledge on biohydrogen production precesses
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Calusinska, Magdalena ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

Poster (2012, June 04)

This poster presents a collaborative research project (MicroH2) held at the University of Liège (Belgium) since 2007 (www.microh2.ulg.ac.be) and involving four different research groups. The project aims ... [more ▼]

This poster presents a collaborative research project (MicroH2) held at the University of Liège (Belgium) since 2007 (www.microh2.ulg.ac.be) and involving four different research groups. The project aims to develop a center of excellence in the fields of photo- and dark- biohydrogen production. Our studies contribute to improve the knowledge of the processes involved in the microbiological production of hydrogen, from a fundamental and practical point of view. Some results are highlighted here. The research concerning photofermentation focuses on the interactions between respiration, photosynthesis and H2-producing pathways in algal microorganisms, by using mitochondrial mutants and genetically modified strains with modified ability for hydrogen production [1-2]. To study the metabolism of the hydrogen production by anaerobic bacteria, pure cultures and defined consortia are used and their production of biogas and soluble metabolites is measured. Moreover, we have developed and optimized molecular tools, like quantitative RT-PCR and FISH, to monitor the variations of bacterial populations in novel bioreactors for hydrogen production [3-4]. We have also mined the complete genomes of Clostridium spp. for putative hydrogenase genes and found a large diversity of them [5]. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of hydrogen partial pressure on fermentative biohydrogen production by a chemotropic Clostridium bacterium in a new horizontal rotating cylinder reactor
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; MAsset, Julien et al

in Energy Procedia (2012)

In order to produce fermentative biohydrogen at high yields and production rates, efficient bioreactors have to be designed. A new reactor called anaerobic biodisc reactor allowed the production of ... [more ▼]

In order to produce fermentative biohydrogen at high yields and production rates, efficient bioreactors have to be designed. A new reactor called anaerobic biodisc reactor allowed the production of biohydrogen from glucose with the selected Clostridium sp. strain at high yields (2.49 molH2•molglucose-1) and production rates (598 mlH2•medium-1•h-1). The bacteria were fixed on a rotating support enabling efficient gas transfer from the liquid to the phase. It allowed the metabolism of the bacteria to produce more hydrogen. Moreover, an increase of the total pressure 0.18 bar lowered the yields of 19.5% while a decrease of 0.11 bar increased the yields of 7%. Our work concludes on the importance of providing good liquid to gas transfers in the biohydrogen-producing reactors. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of nanoparticles as potential activators for the optimization of PAH biodegradation
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Wannoussa, Wissal ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2012, April 10)

These last decades, through the industrial development and its imperfect waste management, the contamination by hydrocarbons in water and soils has led to a progressive deterioration of environmental ... [more ▼]

These last decades, through the industrial development and its imperfect waste management, the contamination by hydrocarbons in water and soils has led to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality, which is more and more considered nowadays. Amongst all the existing cleaning-up techniques, the bioremediation appears as the best compromise between treatment costs and effectiveness. However, this bioprocess remains time-consuming, especially for persistent pollutants as PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). A first way to improve the biodegradation consists in adding a consortium of efficient microorganisms in the polluted area (bioaugmentation). A further way to improve the bioremediation rate is based on the use of nutrients to assist the microbial metabolism (biostimulation). Our project gathers these two methods, specifically for the PAH biodegradation of polluted soils. Firstly, different suitable strains from our lab will be compared together in terms of PAH-degrading rate, in order to select the best microorganisms. As all these strains were selected from a long-term oil-polluted dried soil, they should be able to compete against the endogenous microflora, even if they are injected in the soil in a powdered starter. Secondly, trace elements in the nanoparticulate form, with concentrations of about 10-5M, will be added to catalyze the bacterial metabolism. First results already showed a sharp increase (2 to 3 fold) in the biodegradation kinetics, which is promising for the further scaling-up stages. In addition, this PhD project attempts to understand the mechanism of interaction between bacteria and nanoparticulate catalysts. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentative hydrogen production from glucose and starch using pure strains and artificial co-cultures ofClostridium spp.
Masset, Julien; Calusinska, Magdalena ULg; Hamilton, Christopher et al

in Biotechnology for biofuels (2012), 5(1), 35

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations under sterile conditions. Therefore, H2 production using artificial co-cultures, composed of well characterized strains, is one of the directions currently undertaken in the field of biohydrogen research. RESULTS: Four pure Clostridium cultures, including C. butyricum CWBI1009, C. pasteurianum DSM525, C. beijerinckii DSM1820 and C. felsineum DSM749, and three different co-cultures composed of (1) C. pasteurianum and C. felsineum, (2) C. butyricum and C. felsineum, (3) C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum, were grown in 20 L batch bioreactors. In the first part of the study a strategy composed of three-culture sequences was developed to determine the optimal pH for H2 production (sequence 1); and the H2-producing potential of each pure strain and co-culture, during glucose (sequence 2) and starch (sequence 3) fermentations at the optimal pH. The best H2 yields were obtained for starch fermentations, and the highest yield of 2.91 mol H2/ mol hexose was reported for C. butyricum. By contrast, the biogas production rates were higher for glucose fermentations and the highest value of 1.5 L biogas/ h was observed for the co-culture (1). In general co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure Clostridium cultures, without negatively affecting the H2 yields. Interestingly, all the Clostridium strains and co-cultures were shown to utilize lactate (present in a starch-containing medium), and C. beijerinckii was able to re-consume formate producing additional H2. In the second part of the study the co-culture (3) was used to produce H2 during 13 days of glucose fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In addition, the species dynamics, as monitored by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR), showed a stable coexistence of C. pasteurianum and C. butyricum during this fermentation. CONCLUSIONS: The four pure Clostridium strains and the artificial co-cultures tested in this study were shown to efficiently produce H2 using glucose and starch as carbon sources. The artificial co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure strains, while the H2 yields were only slightly affected. [less ▲]

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See detailLa production de biohydrogène à partir de substrats carbohydratés : état de l'art
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Beckers, Laurent ULg; Masset, Julien ULg et al

in Récents progrès en génie des procédés (2011, December 01)

Hydrogen is being considered as an ideal and clean energy carrier. The recent advances to produce biohydrogen from renewable sources such as biomass and particularly by fermentation of carbohydrate-rich ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen is being considered as an ideal and clean energy carrier. The recent advances to produce biohydrogen from renewable sources such as biomass and particularly by fermentation of carbohydrate-rich substrates from agriculture and agro-industries appear promising. Such a process enables both organic waste treatment and renewable energy production to be coupled. The paper presents the state of the art about the different hydrogen-producing microorganisms and the parameters that have been investigated in order to improve the hydrogen production yields and rates. [less ▲]

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See detailEffets de la pression partielle en hydrogène sur la production anaérobie de bioH2 par une bactérie chimiotrophe du genre Clostridium dans un nouveau réacteur à cylindre horizontal rotatif.
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

in Récents Progrès en Génie des Procédés (2011, December), 101

Hydrogen is widely considered as the most promising energetic carrier. At an industrial scale, steam reforming of methane is currently the major hydrogen producing process. But it may also be produced ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen is widely considered as the most promising energetic carrier. At an industrial scale, steam reforming of methane is currently the major hydrogen producing process. But it may also be produced from renewable biomass. Indeed, the fermentative production of hydrogen from renewable biomass using anaerobic bacteria could at least partially reduce our dependence on fossil fuel, decrease the carbon dioxide emissions and produce “green” energy. It offers the potential production of usable hydrogen from a variety of renewable resources such as carbohydrates wastes from agriculture or agro-food industries. This technology is based on anaerobic fermentation, called dark fermentation, by chemotrophic bacteria. The investigations carried out at CWBI involve selection and characterization of bacteria strains able to produce biohydrogen efficiently and with a wide range of substrate. The selected strains at the laboratory has been characterised as Clostridium sp. In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. At CWBI, a new reactor called “horizontal rotating cylinder bioreactor” allows the production of biohydrogen from glucose with our Clostridium sp. strain with a high yield and production rate. This reactor, working continuously, has an internal volume of 2.3l but a working volume (liquid phase) of 300ml. Firstly, it enhances the hydrogen production rate by partially fixing the bacteria on the porous cylinder and thus increasing the cell concentration in the bioreactor. Secondly, the rotative cylinder enables efficient gas transfer (mainly hydrogen) from the liquid phase where it is produced by the bacteria. This is an important way to enhance hydrogen production yield by allowing the bacteria metabolism to shift in a fermentation type that produces more hydrogen. This was confirmed by increasing or decreasing the total pressure in the bioreactor and observing the influence of hydrogen production. The liquid to gas hydrogen transfer is possibly an important factor to enhance the biogas production. Our investigation confirmed this by testing different liquid to gas transfer condition in BHP test (batch fermentation in 250ml serum bottles).This was made either by decreasing total and partial pressure or by increasing the mixing state of the media. Our work concludes the importance of providing good liquid to gas transfers in the biohydrogen producing reactors to enhance the hydrogen production and reach higher yields and production rates. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of hydrogen partial pressure on fermentative biohydrogen production by a chemotropic Clostridium bacterium in a new horizontal rotating cylinder reactor
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

Poster (2011, December)

The fermentative production of hydrogen using chemotrophic anaerobic bacteria offers a new way to produce “green” energy from a large variety of renewable resources and organic wastes. In order to produce ... [more ▼]

The fermentative production of hydrogen using chemotrophic anaerobic bacteria offers a new way to produce “green” energy from a large variety of renewable resources and organic wastes. In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, efficient bioreactors must be designed. A new reactor called “horizontal rotating cylinder bioreactor” allows the production of biohydrogen from glucose with the selected Clostridium sp. strain at high yields (1,9molH2·molglucose-1) and production rates (48,6mmolH2·lmilieu-1.molhexose-1·h-1). The rotative cylinder where the bacteria are fixed enables efficient gas transfer (mainly hydrogen) from the liquid phase where it is produced by the bacteria. This is an important way to allow the bacteria metabolism to shift in a fermentation pathway that produces more hydrogen. This was confirmed by varying the total pressure in the bioreactor. An increase of the total pressure 0,18bar lowered the yields of 19,5% while a decrease of 0,11bar increased the yields of 7%. Our work concludes the importance of providing good liquid to gas transfers in the biohydrogen-producing reactors in order to reach higher yields and production rates. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis by the sol-gel process of visible light sensitive-TiO2 for the degradation of pollutants and microorganisms
Tasseroul, Ludivine ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Páez Martínez, Carlos ULg et al

in Récents Progrès en Génie des Procédés, Lavoisier Technique et Documentation, Volume 101, 6 p. (CD-ROM) (2011, November 29)

To stabilize the TiO2-dye interaction, free metal tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin and nickel tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin were introduced into the TiO2 matrix by cogelation rather than by grafting. DR ... [more ▼]

To stabilize the TiO2-dye interaction, free metal tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin and nickel tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin were introduced into the TiO2 matrix by cogelation rather than by grafting. DR and FT-IR spectroscopies were performed to establish the interaction between porphyrins and TiO2. Cristallinity and specific surface area were performed by XRD and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The photoactivity of doped-TiO2 xerogels was evaluated for p-nitrophenol and Escherichia coli degradation. Under visible light, the samples allowed the degradation of 40% of p-nitrophenol in 6 h and the elimination of 108 CFU/mL of E. coli in 48 h. [less ▲]

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See detailFermentative biohydrogen production in a novel biodisc bioreactor: Principle and Improvement
Beckers, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Masset, Julien ULg et al

in Bozhou, Li (Ed.) Low Carbon Earth Summit 2011 Proceeding (2011, October 23)

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been ... [more ▼]

In order to produce hydrogen at high yields and production rates, the biotechnological process needs to be further optimized and efficient bioreactors must be designed. A biodisc bioreactor has been design and investigated to produce biohydrogen from glucose by the Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009 strain at a high yield and production rate. This reactor, working continuously, has an internal volume of 2.3l but a working volume (liquid phase) of 300ml. Firstly, it enhances the hydrogen production rate (by about 3 times more than a completely stirred bioreactor) by partially fixing the bacteria on the porous support and thus increasing the cell concentration in the bioreactor (decoupling of HRT and SRT). Secondly, the rotating biodisc design enables efficient gas transfer (hydrogen and carbon dioxyde) from the liquid phase where it is produced by the bacteria to the headspace. Indeed, this is an important way to increase hydrogen production yields (by about 25% compared to a completely stirred bioreactor) by allowing the bacteria to focus on the metabolites pathways that produce more hydrogen. Other reactors designs have shown such good results by increasing the interfacial surface. [less ▲]

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See detailMICRO-H2 – Microbiological production of hydrogen: study of microalgal and bacterial processes
Calusinska, Magdalena ULg; Joris, Bernard ULg; Wilmotte, Annick ULg et al

Poster (2011, September 07)

The project MICRO-H2 aims to study and exploit the microbial (bacterial and algal) production of hydrogen (H2). In addition to building a competence centre around the H2 production by microorganisms and ... [more ▼]

The project MICRO-H2 aims to study and exploit the microbial (bacterial and algal) production of hydrogen (H2). In addition to building a competence centre around the H2 production by microorganisms and the molecular monitoring of the processes, this project tries to address two main socio-economic issues. First, transport and many economic activities will be based on hydrogen energy in the near future. Secondly, many researches and technology developments deal with renewable resources. Therefore, a new integrated technology for a sustainable development should be promoted. Photofermentation and dark-fermentation are the most promising ways to produce biohydrogen. The main advantage of the first process is the complete conversion of substrate, if any, to hydrogen. However, present H2-production rates by microalgae remain low. Therefore, a better understanding of the microalgal hydrogen metabolism and rate improvements by genetic engineering are needed. On the other hand, dark-fermentation achieves at present far higher H2-production rates, but improvements are expected through monitoring and optimisation of bacterial diversity and activity. The objectives about bacterial H2 production were to increase knowledge, stability potentialities and investigation skills about the consortia of bacteria involved in bioreactors treating wastewater rich in carbohydrates to produce biohydrogen. The project focused mainly on the study of the potentialities of different consortia, with a focus on Clostridium strains. Concerning the microalgal production of H2, the objectives were to increase knowledge on the metabolic interactions that determine H2 evolution at the cellular level and to produce new strains with increased ability for H2 production in the two-stage process. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of hydrogen photoproduction in respiratory-deficient mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Lecler, Renaud ULg; Godaux, Damien ULg; Vigeolas, Hélène ULg et al

in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2011), 36

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both ... [more ▼]

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both complexes I and III were analyzed for H2 photoproduction. Several parameters were followed during the S-deficiency stage and the anaerobic stage leading to H2 photoproduction. At the early aerobic S-deficiency stage, starch and neutral lipids accumulated in all strains but their amount was significantly decreased in mutants compared to wild type. During the H2 photoproduction process, whereas starch content strongly decreased in all strains, neutral lipid amount remained nearly unchanged, suggesting that starch degraded by glycolysis is the preferential substrate for energy production during anaerobiosis. The mutants displayed a decrease in H2 photoproduction correlating to the number of active mitochondrial proton-pumping sites lost in the strains. Our results thus highlight the critical role of oxidative phosphorylation during the first (aerobic) stage of S-starvation when carbon resources are accumulated. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis by sol-gel process of visible light sensitive-TiO2 for the degradation of pollutants and microorganisms
Tasseroul, Ludivine ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Páez Martínez, Carlos ULg et al

Poster (2011)

Since the discovery of photocatalytic decomposition of water on TiO2 electrodes by Fujishima and Honda [1], heterogenous photocatalysis has been widely studied for environmental applications ... [more ▼]

Since the discovery of photocatalytic decomposition of water on TiO2 electrodes by Fujishima and Honda [1], heterogenous photocatalysis has been widely studied for environmental applications. Photocatalytic processes are new technologies for waste water treatment because new compounds (alkanes, pesticides, dyes, etc.) in effluents are not readily degraded by the conventional treatments [2]. Oxidative processes can completely destroy organic pollutants [3] or microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc.) [4,5]. At this moment, the commercial Degussa P25 is the mostly used photocatalyst. Nevertheless, it requires UV light to be activated, that is why scientists try to activate TiO2 under visible light. The aim of this study is to synthesize photocatalysts activated by visible light and to evaluate their activity for the degradation of pollutants and microorganisms. The sol-gel process allows the direct introduction of visible light sensitive species like porphyrins inside the TiO2 matrix during the synthesis [6]. Two tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrins are synthesized for the sensitization of TiO2 to visible light : the metal free tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin and the nickel tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin. These porphyrins are characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR and UV/Vis spectroscopies. They are introduced during the sol-gel synthesis of TiO2 matrix. Diffuse reflectance and FT-IR spectroscopies are used to ensure that porphyrins are incorporated inside the matrix of TiO2. Indeed, characteristic porphyrins peaks appear on spectra. The cristallinity and specific surfaces of catalysts are also determined by XRD and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements respectively. The depolluting efficiency of photocatalysts is evaluated for the degradation in water of p-nitrophenol, which is listed as one of the 114 organic pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency in the US. After 6 h under visible light, 40 % of p-nitrophenol are degraded with some catalysts. The activity is influenced by i) the presence of porphyrins : the photoactivity increases with the amount of porphyrins ; ii) the nature of porphyrins : nickel porphyrins are more active than free metal porphyrins ; and iii) the crystallinity of catalysts : amorphous catalysts are less active than crystallized samples. The photocatalysts with the highest degradation rating of dyes will be selected for the degradation in water of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus. [1] A. Fujishima, K. Honda, Nature 238, 37-38 (1972) [2] P. Gogate, A. Pandit, Advances in Environmental Research 8, 501-551 (2004). [3] D. Chen, A. Ray, Water Research 32, 3223-3234 (1998) [4] R. Watts, S. Kong, M. Orr, G. Miller, B. Henry, Water Research 29, 95-100 (1995). [5] J. Hong, M. Otaki, Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering 101, 185-189 (2006). [6] C. Wang, J. Li, G. Mele, G.M. Yang, F.-X. Zhang, L. Palmisano, G. Vasapollo, Applied catalysis 78, 218-226 (2007). [less ▲]

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See detailComparative study of biological hydrogen production by pure strains and consortia of facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Masset, Julien ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg et al

in Bioresource Technology (2011), 102

In this paper, a simple and rapid method was developed in order to assess in comparative tests the production of binary biogas mixtures containing CO2 and another gaseous compound such as hydrogen or ... [more ▼]

In this paper, a simple and rapid method was developed in order to assess in comparative tests the production of binary biogas mixtures containing CO2 and another gaseous compound such as hydrogen or methane. This method was validated and experimented for the characterisation of the biochemical hydrogen potential of different pure strains and mixed cultures of hydrogen-producing bacteria (HPB) growing on glucose. The experimental results compared the hydrogen production yield of 19 different pure strains and sludges : facultative and strict anaerobic HPB strains along with anaerobic digester sludges thermally pre-treated or not. Significant yields variations were recorded even between different strains of the same species by i.e. about 20% for three Clostridium butyricum strains. The pure Clostridium butyricum and pasteurianum strains achieved the highest yields i.e. up to 1,36 mol H2/mol glucose compared to the yields achieved by the sludges and the tested Escherichia and Citrobacter strains. [less ▲]

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See detailLa biométhanisation : technologies de choix
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Conference (2010, November 23)

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See detailInvestigation of anaerobic digestion in a two-stage bioprocess producing hydrogen and methane
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg; Beckers, Laurent ULg et al

Conference (2010, November 17)

Hydrogen has received wide attention in the last decades as a clean energy vector. The major advantage of energy generation from hydrogen is the near-zero carbon emissions, since the utilization of ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen has received wide attention in the last decades as a clean energy vector. The major advantage of energy generation from hydrogen is the near-zero carbon emissions, since the utilization of hydrogen, either via combustion or via fuel cells, results in pure water. Recently, there has been increasing interest on the biological production of hydrogen gas from renewable biomass such as carbohydrates from agriculture or agro-food industries. This specific anaerobic digestion is called dark fermentation and is involved in the classic anaerobic digestion producing methane. Indeed, in a two-step process, i.e. when acido- and aceto-genesis are carried out in a different bioreactor than methanogenesis, it is feasible to generate separated biogas flows containing either H2 or CH4 depending on specific operating parameters. This paper deals with the comparison of the first stage performances whether operated in optimum conditions for H2 production with a mixed culture or a pure Clostridium butyricum strain. Hydrogen yields of about 1.75 and 2.3 mol H2/mol glucose were achieved respectively. The metabolites, mainly acetate and butyrate, contained in the spent medium were efficiently converted to methane in a second anaerobic digester with a methane yield of about 170 ml/g COD initially fed in the first stage. [less ▲]

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