References of "Hiligsmann, Serge"
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See detailERT to monitor the bioremediation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier et al

Conference (2015, June 30)

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the ... [more ▼]

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on numerous environmental characteristics (heterogeneities of the subsurface structure, soil moisture, oxygen and pollutants bioavailability, microbial niches…) and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to lower these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was thus to isolate with ERT an electrical signature corresponding to an enhanced biodegrading activity, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve it, a pilot tank with metric dimensions (3.6 × 0.9 × 0.6 m) and a recirculating system (which is quite unique for this type of purpose) was built to mimic field conditions and to control the evolution of the bio-physico-chemical parameters (microbial concentration in soil and groundwater, temperature, pH, pO2, redox potential, bulk and fluid conductivities, water flow, hydrocarbon content) through time and space. Five panels of electrodes were placed at different locations in the tank to detect lithological heterogeneities and to monitor the bulk resistivity variations with time-lapse ERT. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase with H2O2 and KNO3, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated clay, where pollutants were less bioavailable. Furthermore, lithological heterogeneities (clay, sand, gravels) and microbial activities (growth, degradation and biosurfactant production) were successfully discriminated by ERT images obtained during both remediation phases. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be transferred to the field in order to either (i) detect and forecast biodegradation processes before choosing an appropriate remediation technique, or (ii) monitor the efficiency of this biodegradation during an in-situ bioremediation. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrobial diversity and function during different bioremediation strategies of diesel-polluted soil
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2015, June 16)

In numerous hydrocarbon-polluted sites, oxygen and pollutant bioavailability constitutes the main limiting factors for biodegradation because of the strong adsorption of hydrocarbons on organic soil ... [more ▼]

In numerous hydrocarbon-polluted sites, oxygen and pollutant bioavailability constitutes the main limiting factors for biodegradation because of the strong adsorption of hydrocarbons on organic soil particles (clay and peat). Therefore, several strategies such as biostimulation (with air/H2O2 and/or nutrients) or bioaugmentation are used, but often without understanding the endogenous microflora degrading capacity. This lack of differentiation between indigenous and added microorganisms could lead to poor predictability of the biodegradation efficiency. In addition, anaerobic degradation remains less applied in industrial settings for such compounds (especially for saturated hydrocarbons) as this process remains slow. In this context, the main objective of our study was to understand how the bacterial community evolves, in terms of species and degrading gene diversities, during the application of three different bioremediation strategies in a heavily diesel-polluted clay soil: (i) anaerobic natural attenuation, (ii) bioventing and (iii) bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1. In addition to the supply of new degrading genes, bioaugmentation with this biosurfactant-producing strain should facilitate the bioassimilation of desorbed hydrocarbons by the whole degrading microflora. This hypothesis is strengthened by previous results obtained during several microcosm- and pilot-scale experiments. Aerobic and anaerobic microcosms were set up with three different soil samples coming from the same polluted site. Initially, their global organic content was identical but their hydrocarbon and peat concentrations were different, which led to differential oxygen consumption. Soils were sampled every 10 days to extract the DNA to measure changes in bacterial populations (with RISA analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing) and function (with qPCR and sequencing of degrading genes). Further analyses of the hydrocarbon content by GC-MS and of the genetic diversity by MiSeq metagenomic analysis provided detailed chemical and functional microbial data related to compound degradation and relative gene increases. Initial results showed significant differences in the microbial community structure. Moreover, Rhodococci seem to be maintained in the soil after inoculation. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative biochemical analysis after steam pretreatments of lignocellulosic biomass from six combined morphological parts of Williams Cavendish banana plant (Triploid Musa AAA group)
Kamdem, Irenée ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Tiappi Deumaga, Mathias Florian ULg et al

in Waste Management & Research : The Journal of the International Solid Wastes & Public Cleansing Association (2015)

The accessibility of fermentable substrates to enzymes is a limiting factor for the efficient bioconversion of agricultural wastes in the context of sustainable development. This paper presents the ... [more ▼]

The accessibility of fermentable substrates to enzymes is a limiting factor for the efficient bioconversion of agricultural wastes in the context of sustainable development. This paper presents the results of a biochemical analysis performed on Williams Cavendish Lignocellulosic Biomass (WCLB) after steam cracking (SC) and steam explosion (SE) pretreatments. Solid (S) and liquid (L) fractions (Fs) obtained from SC pretreatment performed at 180°C (SLFSC180) and 210°C (SLFSC210) generated, after diluted acid hydrolysis, the highest proportions of neutral sugar (NS) contents, specifically 52.82±3.51 and 49.78±1.39 %w/w WCLB’s dry matter (DM), respectively. The highest proportions of glucose were found in SFSC210 (53.56±1.33 %w/w DM) and SFSC180 (44.47±0.00 %w/w DM), while the lowest was found in unpretreated WCLB (22.70±0.71 %w/w DM). Total NS content assessed in each LF immediately after SC and SE pretreatments was less than 2 %w/w of the LF’s DM, thus revealing minor acid autohydrolysis consequently leading to minor NS production during the steam pretreatment. WCLB subjected to SC at 210°C (SC210) generated up to 2.7-fold bioaccessible glucan and xylan. SC and SE pretreatments showed potential for the deconstruction of WCLB (delignification, depolymerisation, decrystallization and deacetylation), enhancing its enzymatic hydrolysis. The concentrations of enzymatic inhibitors such as 2-furfuraldehyde and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural from LFSC210 were the highest (41 and 21 µg mL-1, respectively). This study shows that steam pretreatments in general and SC210 in particular are required for efficient bioconversion of WCLB. Yet, biotransformation through biochemical processes (e.g., anaerobic digestion) must be performed to assess the efficiency of these pretreatments. [less ▲]

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See detailValorisation de la biomasse par fermentation : biométhanisation et biohydrogène
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Scientific conference (2015, May 12)

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See detailDetermination of Zinc, Cadmium and Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils at the Single-Cell Level by a Combination of Whole-Cell Biosensors and Flow Cytometry
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Tarayre, Cédric ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg et al

in Sensors (2015)

Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs) that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this ... [more ▼]

Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs) that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the applicability of biosensors as tools able to provide data about the bioavailability of such MTEs in contaminated soils. Here, we tested the genetically-engineered strain Escherichia coli pPZntAgfp as a biosensor applicable to the detection of zinc, lead and cadmium by the biosynthesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) accumulating inside the cells. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the fluorescence induced by the MTEs. A curvilinear response to zinc between 0 and 25 mg/L and another curvilinear response to cadmium between 0 and 1.5 mg/L were highlighted in liquid media, while lead did not produce exploitable results. The response relating to a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 was further investigated. In these conditions, E. coli pPZntAgfp responded to cadmium only. Several contaminated soils with a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 were analyzed with the biosensor, and the metallic concentrations were also measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that E. coli pPZntAgfp could be used as a monitoring tool for contaminated soils being processed. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of iron nanoparticles synthesized by a sol-gel process on Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 for biphenyl degradation
Wannoussa, Wissal ULg; Masy, Thibaut ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Journal of Water Resource and Protection (2015), 7

Nanoparticles (NPS) are considered as a new generation of compounds to improve environmental remediation and biological processes. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of iron NPS ... [more ▼]

Nanoparticles (NPS) are considered as a new generation of compounds to improve environmental remediation and biological processes. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of iron NPS encapsulated in porous silica (SiO2) on the biphenyl biodegradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 (RT902.1). The iron NPS (major iron oxide FexOy form) were dispersed in the porosity of a SiO2 support synthesized by sol-gel process. These Fe/SiO2 NPS offer a stimulating effect on the biodegradation rate of biphenyl, an organic pollutant that is very stable and water-insoluble. This positive impact of NPS on the microbial biodegradation was found to be dependent on the NPS concentration ranging from 10−6 M to 10−4 M. After 18 days of incubation the cultures containing NPS at a concentration of 10−4 M of iron improved RT902.1 growth and degraded 35% more biphenyl than those without NPS (positive control) or with the sole SiO2 particles. Though the microorganism could not interact directly with the insoluble iron NPS, the results show that about 10% and 35% of the initial 10−4 M iron NPS encapsulated in the SiO2 matrix would be incorporated inside or adsorbed on the cell surface respectively and 35% would be released in the supernatant. These results suggest that RT902.1 would produce siderophore-like molecules to attract iron from the porous silica matrix. [less ▲]

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See detailAmélioration de la biodégradation du biphényle par Rhodococcus erythropolis t902.1 en présence de Fe2O3 et de nanoparticules de fer encapsulées dans un xérogel de silice
wanoussa; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Tasseroul, Ludivine ULg et al

in Déchets Sciences et Techniques (2015), 69

In this work, the effect of iron oxide particles Fe2O3 and iron nanoparticles encapsulated in a porous silica matrix (xerogel Fe/SiO2) was investigated on biphenyl biodegradation by the strain Rhodococcus ... [more ▼]

In this work, the effect of iron oxide particles Fe2O3 and iron nanoparticles encapsulated in a porous silica matrix (xerogel Fe/SiO2) was investigated on biphenyl biodegradation by the strain Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1. After 18 days of incubation biodegradation yields of 75% and 85% were achieved respectively in presence of non-autoclaved or autoclaved xerogel Fe/SiO2 at 10-5 M iron. These results are 42 and 60 % higher than in standard conditions without nanoparticles. They suggest that the autoclave procedure lead to the release of some iron less anchored in the silica matrix. This study highlights that siderophore production by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 would be related to the presence of iron nanoparticles in the culture. It suggests that the production of these strong chelating compounds decreases with increase of iron release from xerogel Fe/SiO2. Moreover, most of the surfactants synthesized by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 which are glycolipids containing trehalose (hexose), would be linked to cell surface and not excreted in the culture medium; the biomass hexose content also increased by 85% in presence of iron nanoparticles. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of metal ions and metal nanoparticles encapsulated in porous silica on biodegradation kinetics for biphenyl
Wannoussa, Wissal; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Masy, Thibaut ULg et al

in Journal of Sol-Gel Science and Technology (2015), 75

Biodegradation of biphenyl was carried out by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 in presence of nanometer-sized metallic (Co, Pd, Ag and Cu) nanoparticles (NPS) synthesized by the sol-gel process. In order ... [more ▼]

Biodegradation of biphenyl was carried out by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 in presence of nanometer-sized metallic (Co, Pd, Ag and Cu) nanoparticles (NPS) synthesized by the sol-gel process. In order to prevent their agglomeration, the metallic NPs (1-2 nm diameter) were anchored inside microporous silica crystallites and named Co/SiO2, Pd/SiO2, Ag/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 samples respectively. They were added at low concentrations of 10-6 M, 10-5 M and 10-4 M of metal in the culture medium and their impact was compared with that of the simple metal ions added as cobalt, palladium, silver or copper salts. The cultures containing Pd/SiO2 or Co/SiO2 samples at 10-4 M of metal achieved a 50% higher biphenyl degradation yield after 18 days of incubation and improved Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 growth compared with those without (positive control) or with silica particles only. The highest biodegradation performance, i.e. 107±3 ppm/day, which was about 85% higher than in control conditions without NPs, was recorded in 250 ml baffled flasks stirred at 150 rpm with Co/SiO2 sample at 10-4 M Co. Furthermore, the stimulating effect of NPs on biphenyl biodegradation seems to also depend on the thermal treatment conditions applied to NPs since the experimental results indicated that, after calcination, the cobalt oxide NPs at a concentration of 10-4 M were more effective than the reduced cobalt NPs with a degradation yield of 81±1% and 77±2% respectively after 18 days. On the other hand, the results showed that the addition of 10-4 M of Cu2+ or Ag+ ions or the addition of Cu/SiO2 or Ag/SiO2 samples at 10-4 M of metal have an inhibitory effect on biphenyl biodegradation. However, Cu+2 and Ag+ ions were more toxic to the Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 bacteria than the respective Cu or Ag NPS anchored inside silica particles. Moreover, this work showed that in these conditions, the activity of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase (a critical enzyme in aromatic biodegradation pathway) was severely inhibited, whereas the presence of 10-4 M of Co2+ ions or Co/SiO2 sample stimulated the enzyme activity compared to the conditions without NPs. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of metal ions and metal nanoparticles encapsulated in porous silica on biphenyl biodegradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1
Wannoussa, Wissal ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Tasseroul, Ludivine ULg et al

in Journal of Sol-Gel Science and Technology (2015)

Biodegradation of biphenyl was carried out by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 in presence ofnanometer-sized metallic (Co, Pd, Ag and Cu) nanoparticles (NPS) synthesized by the sol-gel process. In order to ... [more ▼]

Biodegradation of biphenyl was carried out by Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 in presence ofnanometer-sized metallic (Co, Pd, Ag and Cu) nanoparticles (NPS) synthesized by the sol-gel process. In order to prevent their agglomeration, the metallic NPs (1-2 nm diameter) were anchored inside microporous silica crystallites and named Co/SiO2, Pd/SiO2, Ag/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 samples respectively. They were added at low concentrations of 10-6 M, 10-5 M and 10-4 M of metal in the culture medium and their impact was compared with that of the simple metal ions added as cobalt, palladium, silver or copper salts. The cultures containing Pd/SiO2 or Co/SiO2 samples at 10-4 M of metal achieved a 50% higher biphenyl degradation yield after 18 days of incubation and improved Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 growth compared with those without (positive control) or with silica particles only. The highest biodegradation performance, i.e. 107 ±3 ppm/day, which was about 85% higher than in control conditions without NPs, was recorded in 250 ml baffled flasks stirred at 150 rpm with Co/SiO2 sample at 10-4 M Co. Furthermore, the stimulating effect of NPs on biphenyl biodegradation seems to also depend on the thermal treatment conditions applied to NPs since the experimental results indicated that, after calcination, the cobalt oxide NPs at a concentration of 10-4 M were more effective than the reduced cobalt NPs with a degradation yield of 81 ±1% and 77 ±2% respectively after 18 days. On the other hand, the results showed that the addition of 10-4 M of Cu2+ or Ag+ ions or the addition of Cu/SiO2 or Ag/SiO2 samples at 10-4 M of metal have an inhibitory effect on biphenyl biodegradation. However, Cu2+ and Ag+ ions were more toxic to the Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 bacteria than the respective Cu or Ag NPS anchored inside silica particles. Moreover, this work showed that in these conditions, the activity of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase (a critical enzyme in aromatic biodegradation pathway) was severely inhibited, whereas the presence of 10-4 M of Co2+ ions or Co/SiO2 sample stimulated the enzyme activity compared to the conditions without NPs. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative study of the methane production based on the chemical composition of Mangifera Indica and Manihot Utilissima leaves
Mambanzulua Ngoma, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Sumbu Zola, Eric et al

in SpringerPlus (2015), 4(75), 1-8

Leaves of Mangifera Indica (MI, mango leaves) and Manihot Utilissima (MU, cassava leaves) are available in tropical regions and are the most accessible vegetal wastes of Kinshasa, capital of Democratic ... [more ▼]

Leaves of Mangifera Indica (MI, mango leaves) and Manihot Utilissima (MU, cassava leaves) are available in tropical regions and are the most accessible vegetal wastes of Kinshasa, capital of Democratic Republic of Congo. These wastes are not suitably managed and are not rationally valorized. They are abandoned in full air, on the soil and in the rivers. They thus pollute environment. By contrast, they can be recuperated and treated in order to produce methane (energy source), organic fertilizer and clean up the environment simultaneously. The main objective of this study was to investigate methane production from MI and MU leaves by BMP tests at 30°C. The yields achieved from the anaerobic digestion of up to 61.3 g raw matter in 1 l medium were 0.001 l/g and 0.100 l CH4/g volatile solids of MI and MU leaves, respectively. The yield of MU leaves was in the range mentioned in the literature for other leaves because of a poor presence of bioactive substrates, and low C/N ratio. This methane yield corresponded to 7% of calorific power of wood. By contrast, the methane yield from MI leaves was almost nil suggesting some metabolism inhibition because of their rich composition in carbon and bioactive substrates. Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded. Therefore, methane production from the sole MI leaves seems unfavorable by comparison to MU leaves at the ambient temperature in tropical regions. Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers. However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide transcriptional analysis suggests hydrogenase- and nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen production in Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009
Calusinska, Magda; Hamilton, Christopher; Monsieurs, Pieter et al

in Biotechnology for Biofuels (2015), 8(27), 1-16

Background: Molecular hydrogen, given its pollution-free combustion, has great potential to replace fossil fuels in future transportation and energy production. However, current industrial hydrogen ... [more ▼]

Background: Molecular hydrogen, given its pollution-free combustion, has great potential to replace fossil fuels in future transportation and energy production. However, current industrial hydrogen production processes, such as steam reforming of methane, contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect. Therefore alternative methods, in particular the use of fermentative microorganisms, have attracted scientific interest in recent years. However the low overall yield obtained is a major challenge in biological H2 production. Thus, a thorough and detailed understanding of the relationships between genome content, gene expression patterns, pathway utilisation and metabolite synthesis is required to optimise the yield of biohydrogen production pathways. Results: In this study transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the hydrogen-producing bacterium Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009 were carried out to provide a biomolecular overview of the changes that occur when the metabolism shifts to H2 production. The growth, H2-production, and glucose-fermentation profiles were monitored in 20 L batch bioreactors under unregulated-pH and fixed-pH conditions (pH 7.3 and 5.2). Conspicuous differences were observed in the bioreactor performances and cellular metabolisms for all the tested metabolites, and they were pH dependent. During unregulated-pH glucose fermentation increased H2 production was associated with concurrent strong up-regulation of the nitrogenase coding genes. However, no such concurrent up-regulation of the [FeFe] hydrogenase genes was observed. During the fixed pH 5.2 fermentation, by contrast, the expression levels for the [FeFe] hydrogenase coding genes were higher than during the unregulated-pH fermentation, while the nitrogenase transcripts were less abundant. The overall results suggest, for the first time, that environmental factors may determine whether H2 production in C. butyricum CWBI 1009 is mediated by the hydrogenases and/or the nitrogenase. Conclusions: This work, contributing to the field of dark fermentative hydrogen production, provides a multidisciplinary approach for the investigation of the processes involved in the molecular H2 metabolism of clostridia. In addition, it lays the groundwork for further optimisation of biohydrogen production pathways based on genetic engineering techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailThermophilic and cellulolytic consortium isolated from composting plants improves anaerobic digestion of cellulosic biomass: toward a microbial resource management approach
Kinet, Romain ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg et al

in Bioresource Technology (2015)

A cellulolytic consortium was isolated from a composting plant in order to boost the initial hydrolysis step encountered in anaerobic digestion. Improvement of the cellulose degradation, as well as biogas ... [more ▼]

A cellulolytic consortium was isolated from a composting plant in order to boost the initial hydrolysis step encountered in anaerobic digestion. Improvement of the cellulose degradation, as well as biogas production, was observed for the cultures inoculated with the exogenous consortium. Metagenomics analyses pointed out a weak richness (related to the number of OTUs) of the exogenous consortium induced by the selective pressure (cellulose as sole carbon source) met during the initial isolation steps. Main microbial strains determined were strictly anaerobic and belong to the Clostridia class. During cellulose anaerobic degradation, pH drop induced a strong modification of the microbial population. Despite the fact that richness and evenness were very weak, the exogenous consortium was able to adapt and to maintain the cellulolytic degradation potential. This important result point out the fact that simplified microbial communities could be used in order to increase the robustness of mixed cultures involved in environmental biotechnology. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of the links between mass transfer conditions, dissolved hydrogen concentration and biohydrogen production by the pure strain Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009
Beckers, L.; Masset, J.; Hamilton, C. et al

in Biochemical Engineering Journal (2015), 98

Fermentative hydrogen production has often been described as inhibited by its own gas production. In this work, hydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum was investigated in batch Biochemical Hydrogen ... [more ▼]

Fermentative hydrogen production has often been described as inhibited by its own gas production. In this work, hydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum was investigated in batch Biochemical Hydrogen Potential (BHP) tests and in a 2.5L anaerobic sequenced batch reactor (AnSBR) under different operating conditions regarding liquid-to-gas mass transfer. Through the addition of both stirring up to 400rpm and nitrogen sparging, the yields were enhanced from 1.6 to 3.1molH2molglucose -1 and the maximum hydrogen production rates from 140 to 278mLh-1. These original results were achieved with a pure Clostridium strain. They showed that hydrogen production was improved by a higher liquid-to-gas hydrogen transfer resulting in a lower dissolved hydrogen concentration in the culture medium and therefore in a lower bacterial inhibition. In addition, biohydrogen partitioning between the gas and the liquid phase did not conform to Henry's Law due to critical supersaturation phenomena up to seven-fold higher than the equilibrium conditions. Therefore, dissolved hydrogen concentration should be systematically measured instead of the headspace hydrogen partial pressure. A model was proposed to correlate H2 production yield and rate by the pure C. butyricum strain CWBI1009 with mass transfer coefficient KLa. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction de biohydrogène à partir de biomasses
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Scientific conference (2014, October 23)

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See detailMontage de projets de Recherche et d’Innovation : A la recherche de financements
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Scientific conference (2014, October 23)

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See detailTraitement biologique anaérobie des déchets organiques : Comment tirer profit de la biomasse
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg

Scientific conference (2014, October 09)

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