References of "Heinesch, Bernard"
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See detailOverview of CO2 dynamics within sea ice
Delille, Bruno ULg; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Vancoppenolle, M. et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailRespiration of three Belgian crops: Partitioning of total ecosystem respiration in its heterotrophic, above- and below-ground autotrophic components
Suleau, Marie ULg; Moureaux, Christine ULg; Dufranne, Delphine ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2011), (151), 633-643

An experimental system combining an eddy covariance system, a micrometeorological station and soil chambers placed in planted areas and in root exclusion zones was installed during three successive years ... [more ▼]

An experimental system combining an eddy covariance system, a micrometeorological station and soil chambers placed in planted areas and in root exclusion zones was installed during three successive years in a production crop managed in a traditional way at the Lonzée experimental site (Belgium). Measurements were made successively on seed potato, winter wheat and sugar beet. The general objectives of the study were, first to evaluate the relative contributions to total ecosystem respiration (TER) of heterotrophic, above ground autotrophic and below ground autotrophic respiration over a succession of three agricultural crops (seed potato, winter wheat and sugar beet) cultivated on successive years at the same location and, secondly, to identify the driving variables of these contributions. Results showed that, during the observation periods, TER was dominated by autotrophic respiration (AR) (60–90%) and that AR was dominated by its above ground component (60–80%). HR was found to increase with temperature and to be independent of Gross Primary Production (GPP), whereas AR was driven by GPP and was mostly independent of temperature. The AR response to GPP was specific to the crop: not only AR intensity but also AR distribution between its above- (ARa) and below- (ARb) ground components were found to differ from one crop to another and, in the winter wheat, from one development stage to another. Generally, ARb contribution to AR was found larger when carbon allocation towards roots was more important. An uncertainty analysis was made and showed that the main sources of uncertainties on the estimates were the spatial variability for soil chamber measurements and uncertainties linked to the data gap filling method for eddy covariance measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes
Stavrakou, T.; Guenther, A.; Razavi, A. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2011), 11

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See detailIsoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, N. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45

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See detailDynamic processes in sea ice captured by the temporal evolution of its biogeochemical
Zhou, Jiayun; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

in VLIZ Special Publication (2011), 48

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See detailNight-time airflow in a forest canopy near a mountain crest
Sedlak, Pavel; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2010), 150(5), 736-744

Night-time airflow within a deep and dense canopy near the top of a mountain ridge is investigated based on measurements at Bily Kriz, Czech Republic. The site is characterized by a young Norway spruce ... [more ▼]

Night-time airflow within a deep and dense canopy near the top of a mountain ridge is investigated based on measurements at Bily Kriz, Czech Republic. The site is characterized by a young Norway spruce forest on a 13 degrees slope and the occurrence of almost exclusively upslope or downslope flows. The forest canopy reaches the ground surface. A decoupled two-layer structure of canopy flow typically develops at night. While the above-canopy flow is most frequently an upslope-directed larger-scale flow over the ridge, the lower-canopy flow is downslope (katabatic). However, the lower-canopy flow can be forced upslope when the wind speed above the canopy exceeds a well-defined limit. Less frequently, on the lee slope to the larger-scale flow, both the above-canopy and the lower-canopy flow are usually downslope, although a flow reversal in the lower canopy is also observed, accompanied with a large shear stress (friction velocity) above the canopy. The occurrence of opposing flows is not limited to sunset/sunrise transition periods. In a simplified modelling approach to the dynamics of the nocturnal lower-canopy flow decoupled from above, local equilibrium is assumed of solely two opposing driving forces - one induced by the negative buoyancy (due to radiative cooling of the canopy) and the other by the hydrodynamic pressure gradient (resulting from the larger-scale flow over the ridge) - and the canopy drag as a retarding force. The diagnostic model gives realistic values of the major driving terms for Bily Kriz, and the downslope or upslope direction and speed of the lower-canopy flow that agree well with the measurements. The model contributes to better interpretation of the experimental results, which are in accordance with recent publications on the flow patterns on forested hills. Knowledge of the lower-canopy flow behaviour and of the degree of its decoupling from the flow aloft is necessary for assessing the contribution of advection to the CO2 budget at sloping forest sites, and for analysis of the flux footprint. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDirect advection measurements do not help to solve the night-time CO2 closure problem: Evidence from three different forests
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Feigenwinter, Christian; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2010), 150(5), 655-664

The ADVEX project involved conducting extensive advection measurements at three sites, each with a different topography. One goal of the project was to measure the [CO2] balance under night-time ... [more ▼]

The ADVEX project involved conducting extensive advection measurements at three sites, each with a different topography. One goal of the project was to measure the [CO2] balance under night-time conditions, in an attempt to improve NEE estimates. Four towers were arranged in a square around a main tower, with the sides of the square about 100 m long. Equipped with 16 sonic anemometers and [CO2] sampling points, the towers were installed to measure vertical and horizontal advection of [CO2]. Vertical turbulent fluxes were measured by an eddy covariance system at the top of the main tower. The results showed that horizontal advection varied greatly from site to site and from one wind sector to another, the highest values being reached when there were large friction velocities and fairly unstable conditions. There was less variation in vertical advection, the highest values being reached when there were low friction velocities and stable conditions. The night-time NEE estimates deduced from the mass balance were found to be incompatible with biologically driven fluxes because (i) they varied strongly from one wind sector to another and this variation could not be explained in terms of a response of the biologic flux to climate, (ii) their order of magnitude was not realistic and (iii) they still showed a trend vs. friction velocity. From a critical analysis of the measurement and data treatment we concluded that the causes of the problem are related to the representativeness of the measurement (control volume size, sampling resolution) or the hypotheses underlying the derivation of the [CO2] mass balance (ignoring the horizontal turbulent flux divergence). This suggests that the improvement of eddy flux measurements by developing an advection completed [CO2] mass balance at night would be practically difficult. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term carbon dioxide exchange above a mixed forest in the Belgian Ardennes: evaluation of different approaches to deduce total ecosystem respiration from Eddy covariance measurements
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2010, May 05)

The general aim of this research is to analyze inter annual variability of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes exchanged by a mixed forest located at the Vielsalm experimental site in Belgium. At this site, CO2 ... [more ▼]

The general aim of this research is to analyze inter annual variability of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes exchanged by a mixed forest located at the Vielsalm experimental site in Belgium. At this site, CO2 flux measurements started in 1996 and are still going on. Thirteen complete years of measurements are thus available. Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) inter annual variability may be driven by gross primary productivity (GPP) or Total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), which should thus be both quantified. Using flux partitioning methods, TER is deduced from NEE measurements. GPP is then obtained by subtracting TER from NEE. Initially, a robust estimation of TER is required. This work seeks to compare two independent approaches to assess TER in order to quantify the implications on inter-annual variability. The comparison was performed on twelve complete years. TER estimates can be deduced by extrapolating to the whole day NEE measurements taken during selected night or day periods. In both case, the extrapolation is performed by using a respiration response to temperature. The first approach, referred as the night-time approach, consisted in calculating TER using a temperature response function derived from night-time data sets (Reichstein et al., 2005). The second approach, referred as the daytime approach, consisted in assessing TER from the intercept of the NEE/Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) response (Wohlfahrt et al., 2005). For each approach, different modalities were compared: the use of long term (annual) or short term (15 days) data sets for the night-time approach and the use of different types of regression for the daytime approach. In addition, the impact of the temperature choice was studied for each of the approaches. For the night-time approach, main results showed that air temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration derived from annual data did not reflect the short-term air temperature sensitivity. Vielsalm is a summer active ecosystem (annual temperature sensitivity larger than short-term temperature sensitivity). Results suggested also that, for both approaches, regressions based on soil temperature gave more robust results than those based on air temperature. Furthermore, the comparison showed that the night-time and the daytime approaches give disagreeing pictures of TER inter annual variability which suggested that the choice of the approach is critical in order to correctly depict TER inter annual variability. Finally, at this stage, TER inter annual variability cannot be explained by variability of climatic conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailVOC emissions from a temperate mixed forest in Belgium measured by eddy-covariance
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2010, May)

Forest ecosystems are known to be important emitters of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC). They play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to the formation of ozone ... [more ▼]

Forest ecosystems are known to be important emitters of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC). They play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to the formation of ozone and aerosols with consequences on air quality and on climate. In order to better understand the effects of environmental parameters on the emissions, micrometeorological flux measurements were carried out above a mixed forest (Fagus sylvatica, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Abies alba, Picea abies) at the Vielsalm experimental site (Belgium) from July to November 2009. The flux measurements were obtained by the eddy-covariance technique using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. In our first measurement campaign, among other VOC compounds, isoprene (m/z 69) and monoterpenoid compounds (m/z 137) have been measured continuously with a data coverage of 75 and 58 % respectively, allowing robust statistical analysis. In our analysis, we focused on these two main emissions. A footprint analysis showed that Fagus sylvatica seems to be the main emitter of m/z 137 and Abies alba seems to be the main emitter of m/z 69. BVOCs fluxes present an exponential response to temperature. This response is more pronounced for m/z 69 while it shows the strongest seasonal evolution for m/z 137. A light dependence of m/z 69 and m/z 137 fluxes was observed but the relationship did not exhibit the same behaviour before (hyperbolic relation) and after midday (linear relation). This behaviour difference induced a hysteresis effect on the daily evolution of averaged fluxes. A robust local minimum was also observed just before midday for m/z 69 (less obvious for m/z 137) during July-August period. This minimum is not observed in the CO2 fluxes which are also measured in Vielsalm. The light dependence of BVOC emissions suggests that m/z 69 and m/z 137 emissions are directly linked to the photosynthetic cycle but the presence of the midday local minimum suggests that other processes influence the measured BVOC fluxes. As for the relation with air temperature, a seasonal evolution of flux-light dependence was far more evident for m/z 137 than for m/z 69. This seasonal variation could be explained by a phenological effect. As Fagus sylvatica is the main m/z 137 emitter, its flux is probably influenced by leaves ageing while m/z 69, as mainly emitted by Abies alba, is less influenced by needles ageing. A wind speed dependence of BVOCs fluxes was also observed, the flux increasing linearly with wind speed. This surprising result will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAir-sea ice CO2 fluxes measurement with eddy-covariance micrometeorological technique
Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Carnat, Gauthier et al

Conference (2010, April)

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See detailMicrometeorological survey of air-sea ice CO2 fluxes in arctic coastal waters
Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Tison, Jean-Louis; Carnat, Gauthier et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010), 12(EGU2010-10570),

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See detailNew Transfer Functions for Correcting Turbulent Water Vapour Fluxes
De Ligne, Anne ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

in Boundary-Layer Meteorology (2010), 137(2), 205-221

We address the problem of the high-frequency correction of water vapour fluxes measured by eddy covariance with a closed-path infrared gas analyser (IRGA). Different transfer functions are compared and ... [more ▼]

We address the problem of the high-frequency correction of water vapour fluxes measured by eddy covariance with a closed-path infrared gas analyser (IRGA). Different transfer functions are compared and evaluated at a forested (Vielsalm, Belgium) and an agricultural (Lonz,e, Belgium) site. Classical functions, usually applied to correct CO2 fluxes (Gaussian, Lorentzian), are found to be unsuited to water vapour cospectral corrections, being characterised by too sharp a decrease at high frequency. Two other functions characterised by a lower decreasing slope are found to better fit experimental transfer functions. They were calibrated and validated on experimental transfer functions and their dependency on air humidity is parameterised. On this basis, new correction coefficients are estimated. The coefficients are found to be larger than those based on the classical functions, even when the dependency of the latter on air humidity is taken into account. The difference amounts to 10 at the forested site and to 5 larger at the crop site. The study highlights the necessity of characterising the water transfer function shape and taking it into account in the correction factor at each site equipped with a closed path IRGA. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecies effect on the water use efficiency of a mixed forest of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) in Belgium Ardennes
Soubie, Rémy; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2010)

Induced by climate change, intensity and frequency of droughts should be more important for the next century. How does water availability affect the physiology of woody plants at the species and stand ... [more ▼]

Induced by climate change, intensity and frequency of droughts should be more important for the next century. How does water availability affect the physiology of woody plants at the species and stand scale? Carbon and water vapour fluxes measurements of a mixed forest (deciduous and coniferous) were performed for over ten years by the eddy covariance method in Belgian Ardennes (Aubinet et al, 2001) as a part of the CarboEurope project. Whereas carbon fluxes have been analyzed in detailed and good estimations of the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) and Gross Primary Production (GPP) were obtained, a thorough analysis of water vapour fluxes remains to be done. Improving analysis of water vapour fluxes and monitoring species transpiration will contribute to the estimation of the water use efficiency, WUE, at both the species and stand scale. The WUE well characterizes the vegetation productivity and ecosystem response to environmental factors. It also allows evaluating the sensitivity of temperate woody species to drought. The species concerned are beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). Since summer 2009 we monitor and analyze each species water use by measuring sap flow with the thermal dissipation method (Granier, 1987). Results at the species level will then be upscaled and compared to stand water vapour fluxes measurements obtained by the eddy covariance methodology. Transpiration of each species will be analyzed in relation with their own phenological and ecophysiological attributes, ecosystem soil and atmospheric conditions, to clarify among others their behaviour in case of water deficit. Data are actually analysed, the presented results will concern the 2009, and a part of 2010 growing season. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of two drainage flow situations on a gentle forested slope
Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Yernaux, Michel ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2010)

Drainage flows generated on a gentle slope in stable conditions were analysed at the forested site of Vielsalm (Belgium). Two distinct situations were encountered, one corresponding to vertical ... [more ▼]

Drainage flows generated on a gentle slope in stable conditions were analysed at the forested site of Vielsalm (Belgium). Two distinct situations were encountered, one corresponding to vertical convergence, characterised by a negative vertical velocity at the canopy top, the other corresponding to an equilibrium situation without any vertical movement. The causes of these two distinct flow patterns were analysed. Moreover, combined measurements of vertical velocity above the canopy and horizontal velocity divergence below the canopy were found to comply with the continuity equation: an acceleration of the horizontal flow was indeed observed in the trunk-space in convergence situations while not in equilibrium conditions. These measurements combined with those of the horizontal [CO2] gradient below the canopy were found to met the dilution hypothesis suggested by Aubinet et al.(2003): the horizontal [CO2] gradient was negative in convergence situations while slightly positive in equilibrium conditions. The existence of such patterns allows us to confirm the coherence of advection observations made at the site and help to better understand the mechanisms responsible of night flux exchanges at work in stable conditions in complex terrains. Nevertheless, difficulties were met when trying to obtain reliable estimates of the advection transport terms. The estimation of the vertical velocity in the trunk-space obtained by using the divergence measurements refuted the hypothesis of linearity of the vertical profile of vertical velocity, assumption usually used when computing vertical advection. This problem resulted in a great uncertainty on vertical advection which did not allowed to improve the night-flux estimation by adding advection terms to the turbulent flux and the storage. [less ▲]

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See detailClimate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents
Yi, Chuixiang; Ricciuto, Daniel; Li, Runze et al

in Environmental Research Letters (2010), 5(3),

Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating ... [more ▼]

Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes and continents are lacking. Here we present data describing the relationships between net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and climate factors as measured using the eddy covariance method at 125 unique sites in various ecosystems over six continents with a total of 559 site-years. We find that NEE observed at eddy covariance sites is (1) a strong function of mean annual temperature at mid-and high-latitudes, (2) a strong function of dryness at mid-and low-latitudes, and (3) a function of both temperature and dryness around the mid-latitudinal belt (45 degrees N). The sensitivity of NEE to mean annual temperature breaks down at similar to 16 degrees C (a threshold value of mean annual temperature), above which no further increase of CO2 uptake with temperature was observed and dryness influence overrules temperature influence. [less ▲]

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See detailHistory effect of light and temperature on monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L.
Demarcke, M.; Schoon, N.; Van Langenhove, H. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2010), 44(27), 3261-3268

Monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L trees have been measured at light- and temperature-controlled conditions in a growth chamber, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and ... [more ▼]

Monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L trees have been measured at light- and temperature-controlled conditions in a growth chamber, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and the dynamic branch enclosure technique. De novo synthesized monoterpenoid Standard Emission Factors, obtained by applying the G97 algorithm (Guenther, 1997), varied between 2 and 32 mu g g(-1)DW h(-1) and showed a strong decline in late August and September, probably due to senescence. The response of monoterpenoid emissions to temperature variations at a constant daily light pattern could be well reproduced with a modified version of the MEGAN algorithm (Guenther et al., 2006), with a typical dependence on the average temperature over the past five days. The diurnal emissions at constant temperature showed a typical hysteretic behaviour, which could also be adequately described with the modified MEGAN algorithm by taking into account a dependence on the average light levels experienced by the trees during the past 10-13 h. The impact of the past light and temperature conditions on the monoterpenoid emissions from E sylvatica L was found to be much stronger than assumed in previous algorithms. Since our experiments were conducted under low light intensity, future studies should aim at confirming and completing the proposed algorithm updates in sunny conditions and natural environments. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailANNUAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT PHASE II "Impact of Phenology and Environmental Conditions on BVOC Emissions from Forest Ecosystems" "IMPECVOC"
Dewulf, Jo; Joó, Eva; Steppe, Kathy et al

Report (2009)

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See detailEvaluation of the suitability of the land surface model JULES for climate impact studies in Belgian ecosystem
Van Den Hoof, Catherine; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

Conference (2009, October)

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See detailMeasuring air-ice CO2 fluxes in the Arctic
Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Yernaux, Michel; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in FluxLetter: the Newsletter of FLUXNET (2009), 2(2), 9-10

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (16 ULg)