References of "Heinen, Ernst"
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See detailDoes spleen innervation influence TSE pathogenesis?
Jolois, Olivier ULg; Farquhar, Christine; Brown, Karen et al

Poster (2001)

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See detailSpermine induces precocious development of the spleen in Wistar rat
Peulen, Olivier ULg; Jolois, Olivier ULg; Galopin, Catherine et al

in Trends in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology (2001), 8

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See detailHuman Fdc Express Prpc in Vivo and in Vitro
Thielen, Caroline ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Mélot, France ULg et al

in Developmental Immunology (2001), 8(3-4), 259-66

Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by accumulation of abnormal prion protein (protease-resistant prion, PrPres). PrPres accumulation is also detected in lymphoid organs after ... [more ▼]

Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by accumulation of abnormal prion protein (protease-resistant prion, PrPres). PrPres accumulation is also detected in lymphoid organs after peripheral infection. Several studies suggest that follicular dendritic cells (FDC) could be the site of PrPres retention and amplification. Here we show that human follicular dendritic cells can express normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) both in situ and in vitro. When tonsillar cryosections were treated with anti-PrP antibody, the label was found on some very delicate cell extensions inside the lymphoid follicles, especially in the germinal centres. These extensions react with DRC1 antibody, used frequently to label FDC. Other structures labelled with anti-PrP antibody were the keratinocytes. To confirm the ability of FDC to synthesise PrPc, we isolated FDC by a non-enzymatic procedure and cultured them. By cytochemistry and flow cytometry it was clearly shown that FDC do produce PrPc. [less ▲]

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See detailTolerance to the Foeto-Placental 'Graft': Ten Ways to Support a Child for Nine Months
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Current Opinion in Immunology (2000), 12(6), 731-7

Tolerance to the foetal 'allograft' has been extensively studied in the past few years, providing interesting new insights. In addition to a potential role for HLA-G, which has been widely discussed ... [more ▼]

Tolerance to the foetal 'allograft' has been extensively studied in the past few years, providing interesting new insights. In addition to a potential role for HLA-G, which has been widely discussed, there are hypotheses suggesting roles for several other molecules or cells: leukemia inhibitory factor and its receptor; indoleamine 2. 3-dioxygenase; the Th1/Th2 balance; suppressor macrophages; hormones such as progesterone or the placental growth hormone; CD95 and its ligand; and, as recently proposed, annexin II. Tolerance of the foetal allograft is probably the consequence of a wide panel of mechanisms that may or may not be pregnancy-specific, that are of major or secondary importance and that may be interconnected. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential Expression of Cellular Prion Protein on Human Blood and Tonsil Lymphocytes
Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cesbron, J. Y.; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Haematologica (2000), 85(5), 475-80

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The expression of cellular prion protein (PrPc) on the surface of peripheral lymphocytes has been previously reported, but little is known about its expression on lymphoid cells ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The expression of cellular prion protein (PrPc) on the surface of peripheral lymphocytes has been previously reported, but little is known about its expression on lymphoid cells from secondary lymph organs. In this report, we compare the surface expression of PrPc on human blood lymphocytes and tonsil lymphocytes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This analysis was performed by cytometry on live lymphocytes isolated from healthy donors or from the tonsils of adults or children. RESULTS: Human peripheral lymphocytes and tonsillar lymphoid cells, but not erythrocytes or granulocytes, express PrPc at their surfaces. Interestingly, we found significantly less PrPc on freshly isolated tonsil lymphocytes, both B and T, than on blood cells. Although tonsil cells bear less PrPc than circulating blood lymphocytes, they are able to express high quantities of PrPc on their surface when placed in culture. However, contrary to previous results, mitogen stimulation does not affect this expression on B- or T-cells. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the PrPc expression by lymphocytes may be modified by interactions occurring during intratissular migration or during cell-to-cell contacts. Whether PrPc plays a role in intracellular communication at this location, as it does in the nervous system, remains an open question. [less ▲]

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See detailTnp-470, a Potent Angiogenesis Inhibitor, Amplifies Human T Lymphocyte Activation through an Induction of Nuclear Factor-Kappab, Nuclear Factor-at, and Activation Protein-1 Transcription Factors
Locigno, Roberto; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Bours, Vincent ULg et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (2000), 80(1), 13-21

TNP-470, an angiogenesis inhibitor derived from fumagillin, is foreseen as a promising anti-cancer drug. Its effectiveness to restrain tumor growth and its lack of major side effects have been ... [more ▼]

TNP-470, an angiogenesis inhibitor derived from fumagillin, is foreseen as a promising anti-cancer drug. Its effectiveness to restrain tumor growth and its lack of major side effects have been demonstrated in several animal models and have led the drug to reach phase III clinical trials. Beside its antiangiogenesis activities, TNP-470 exhibits several effects on the immune system. We had shown previously that TNP-470 stimulated B lymphocyte proliferation through an action on T cells. In this study, we examined the cellular and molecular modifications induced by TNP-470 in normal human T lymphocytes. Transmission electron microscopic examination of PHA/TNP-470-treated T cells revealed significant morphologic modifications when compared with PHA-treated control T cells. TNP-470 induced indeed an important and significant increase of the nuclear size as well as major nuclear chromatin decondensation. This observation indicated that TNP-470 amplified T-cell activation and led us to investigate its effects on the activation of transcription factors involved in T-cell activation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have demonstrated that TNP-470 amplifies and extends the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-AT, nuclear factor-KB, and activation protein-1 in T cells. Furthermore, the angioinhibin significantly increased the secretion of IL-2 and IL-4. Our data demonstrate that TNP-470 amplifies the activation of T cells. This effect, whose molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, has to be taken into account in the assessment of the antitumor effect of the drug. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of nicotine on rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro
Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Defresne, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Connective Tissue Research (2000), 41(1), 69-80

Nicotine from 3 to 5 mM affects growth and survival rate of rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilated mitochondria and vacuolization in treated cells, suggestive of ... [more ▼]

Nicotine from 3 to 5 mM affects growth and survival rate of rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilated mitochondria and vacuolization in treated cells, suggestive of necrosis, but increased apoptosis was also revealed by cytometry. On the basis of this in vitro study, it appear that tobacco, through its component nicotine, may directly affect various functions of rat gingival fibroblasts [less ▲]

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See detailFollicular dendritic cells in vitro modulate the expression of Fas and Bcl-2 on germinal center B cells.
Tsunoda, R.; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Sugai, N.

in Cell & Tissue Research (2000), 299(3), 395-402

Germinal center (GC) B cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis. The cellular mechanism regulating this sensitivity, however, has not yet been fully delineated. To investigate whether follicular ... [more ▼]

Germinal center (GC) B cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis. The cellular mechanism regulating this sensitivity, however, has not yet been fully delineated. To investigate whether follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are capable of regulating the susceptibility to apoptosis of GC B cells, we constructed a GC model in vitro: emperipolesis of tonsillar B cells by FDC. We then analyzed the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Fas) on the cells by three-color flow cytometry. B cells nonentrapped by FDC decreased rapidly in number owing to early apoptosis in vitro, whereas entrapped B cells were rescued for at least 18 h and showed peculiar regulation of Fas and Bcl-2. GC founder cells (CD38+, IgD+; GCFC) and GC B cells (CD38+, IgD-) showed approximately a twofold increased expression of Fas; in contrast, mantle zone B cells (CD38-, IgD+) and memory B cells (CD38-, IgD-) showed no changes. Bcl-2 expression in mantle zone and memory B cells was reduced by approximately one-half; however, GCFC and GC B cells continued to express little Bcl-2 and this did not change. Our findings strongly suggest that FDC play a part in the modulation of the susceptibility to apoptosis on B cells within GC. [less ▲]

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See detailLimited effects of placental and pituitary growth hormone on cytokine expression in vitro
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Devos, Sébastien ULg et al

in European Cytokine Network (2000), 11(3), 452-455

The hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) can affect immune responses in man has been evaluated by monitoring cytokine expression in cultures from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, by enzyme-linked ... [more ▼]

The hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) can affect immune responses in man has been evaluated by monitoring cytokine expression in cultures from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ribonuclease protection assay, and in tonsillar cells by ELISA. In addition to pituitary GH (GH-N), the placental form (GH-V), differing from pituitary GH by 13 amino acids has also been tested. Only few effects reached statistical significance and were in no case greater than 15%. Pituitary GH slightly reduced IL-5 production and stimulated IFN-gamma production. The latter effect was also observed with prolactin and could thus be induced through the prolactin receptor. It is proposed that GH has no strong effects on the parameters investigated, possibly as a result of redundancy in the cytokine network. Alternatively, effects on leukocytes are mediated by other tissues such as the liver or are clear only in response to stronger challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailEpithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice.
Lemaire-Vieille, C.; Schulze, T.; Podevin-Dimster, V. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2000), 97(10), 5422-7

The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(c)) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell ... [more ▼]

The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(c)) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrP(c) is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrP(c), a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrP(c) at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes spleen innervation influence TSE pathogenesis?”
Jolois, Olivier ULg; Farquhar, Christine; Brown, Karen et al

Poster (2000)

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See detailCulture of Gingival Fibroblasts on Bioabsorbable Regenerative Materials in Vitro
Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Kalykakis, G. K. et al

in Journal of Periodontology (1999), 70(10), 1234-9

BACKGROUND: The use of membranes in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) can limit the apical migration of gingival cells and favor the establishment of new attachment by periodontal ligament fibroblasts ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The use of membranes in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) can limit the apical migration of gingival cells and favor the establishment of new attachment by periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However, gingival recession during healing following GTR has been described as a frequent complication. The purpose of this study was to determine if gingival fibroblasts are affected by the composition of the bioabsorbable membranes used in mucogingival surgery. METHODS: Two type of bioabsorbable regenerative materials were used as cell carriers. Wistar rat gingival fibroblasts (RGF) were obtained from attached gingiva, cut into small fragments, and placed in culture dishes. When confluent, cells were detached using trypsin and identified as "first transferred cells" (P1). At the third passage (P3), cell count, trypan blue exclusion test, acid phosphatase activity, DNA synthesis, phase contrast microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were performed. The cells were then placed in wells containing the membranes and incubated for 72 hours. RESULTS: When examined under microscopy, the control wells (without membranes) showed one cell type with the elongated appearance characteristic of fibroblasts. The wells with membranes showed an altered cell morphology with a high proportion of cell fragments regardless of the type of membrane used. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cell carrier membranes could affect RGF morphology and thus alter gingival tissue healing following GTR. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular and cellular basis of the altered immune response against arsonate in irradiated A/J mice autologously reconstituted.
Ismaili, Jamila; Razanajaona, Diane; Van Acker, Annette et al

in International Immunology (1999), 11(7), 1157-67

The humoral immune response to arsonate (Ars) in normal A/J mice is dominated in the late primary and particularly in the secondary response by a recurrent and dominant idiotype (CRIA) which is encoded by ... [more ▼]

The humoral immune response to arsonate (Ars) in normal A/J mice is dominated in the late primary and particularly in the secondary response by a recurrent and dominant idiotype (CRIA) which is encoded by a single canonical combination of the variable gene segments: VHidcr11-DFL16.1-JH2 and Vkappa10-Jkappa1. Accumulation of somatic mutations within cells expressing this canonical combination or some less frequent Ig rearrangements results in the generation of high-affinity antibodies. By contrast, in partially shielded and irradiated A/J mice (autologous reconstitution) immunized with Ars-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), both the dominance of the CRIA idiotype and the affinity maturation are lost, whereas the anti-Ars antibody titer is not affected. To understand these alterations, we have analyzed a collection of 27 different anti-Ars hybridomas from nine partially shielded and irradiated A/J mice that had been immunized twice with Ars-KLH. Sequence analysis of the productively rearranged heavy chain variable region genes from those hybridomas revealed that (i) the canonical V(D)J combination was rare, (ii) the pattern of V(D)J gene usage rather corresponded to a primary repertoire with multiple gene combinations and (iii) the frequency of somatic mutations was low when compared to a normal secondary response to Ars. In addition, immunohistological analysis has shown a delay of 2 weeks in the appearance of full blown splenic germinal centers in autoreconstituting mice, as compared to controls. Such a model could be useful to understand the immunological defects found in patients transplanted with bone marrow. [less ▲]

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See detailLymphoid cell apoptosis induced by trophoblastic cells: a model of active foeto-placental tolerance
Coumans, Bernard ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Journal of Immunological Methods (1999), 224(1-2), 185-196

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts ... [more ▼]

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts with lymphoid cells and scored the frequency of cell death in these cultures. We prepared human trophoblastic cells from term placentas removed by C-section and placed them in culture for 48 h before introducing the lymphoid cells. We added Jurkat cells, a CD3 + lymphoid cell line, or purified T cells from human blood to the cultured trophoblasts and monitored apoptosis by electron microscopy and flow cytometry after TUNEL or annexin V labelling. The frequency of cell death in the CD3 + cell population was higher when the lymphoid cells were cocultured with trophoblastic cells than when they were cultured alone. This frequency increased with time but was reduced when anti-CD95-L antibodies were added to the culture medium. Cell death was less frequent in the lymphoid cell population when trophoblasts were replaced with human fibroblasts not expressing CD95-L. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHousekeeping Genes as Internal Standards: Use and Limits
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (1999), 75(2-3), 291-5

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their ... [more ▼]

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled that the commonly used internal standards can quantitatively vary in response to various factors. Possible variations are illustrated using three experimental examples. Preferred types of internal standards are then proposed for each of these samples and thereafter the general procedure concerning the choice of an internal standard and the way to manage its uses are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGraft of autologous fibroblasts in gingival tissue in vivo after culture in vitro. Preliminary study on rats.
Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Journal of Periodontal Research (1999), 34(6), 323-8

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a ... [more ▼]

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a gingival recession during the healing period following the therapy. The graft of a small autologous connective tissue, using non-invasive surgical techniques could yield several benefits for the patients. Our preliminary study explores the feasibility of collecting healthy gingival tissues, culturing them in vitro to amplify rat gingival fibroblasts (RGF) and inoculating the obtained cells into autologous rat gingival tissues in vivo. Gingival tissues samples were cultured as explants as described by Freshney et al. and Adolphe. Confluent cells surrounding explants were detached after 7 d of culture from Petri dishes using 0.05% trypsin and designated "first transferred cells" (T1). At the third passage (T3), cells cultured as monolayer were either examined under microscopy--phase contrast, scanning, or transmission electron--or numerated after trypan blue exclusion test. Autologous RGF labelled with fluorochrome were inoculated at the vestibular and palatine site of gingival tissue close to the superior incisors. In this preliminary study, 12 Wistar rats were used; for each, 2 biopsies were dissected and fixed for phase contrast or fluorescence microscopy. On d 1, 3 and 7 after injection in rat gingival tissues, fluorochrome-labelled cells could be detected in all these. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Growth Hormone Receptors by Lymphocyte Subpopulations in the Human Tonsil
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Developmental Immunology (1998), 6(3-4), 295-304

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the ... [more ▼]

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the receptors, in combination with phenotype markers. Unlike T cells, tonsillar B cells constitutively express the hGH-N receptor. Quiescent cells separated from activated cells by Percoll-gradient centrifugation bear fewer receptors than activated ones. Activated T cells express hGH-N-R, but the typical germinal centre CD4+ CD57+ T cells do not. These latter thus appear not to be fully activated. Inside the lymph follicles, the germinal centre CD38+ B-cell population and the mantle-zone CD39+ B-cell population display similar levels of hGH-N-R expression, but receptor density is lower on dividing dark-zone CD38+ CD10+ B cells. Different lymphoid-cell populations thus differ markedly in their ability to express the growth hormone receptor, in relation notably to their activation status. This highlights the link between the neuroendocrine system and the active immune defense. [less ▲]

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See detailThe mouse lymph organs
Heinen, Ernst ULg; Defresne, M. P.

in "Handbook of Vertebrate Immunology (1998)

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See detailDemonstration of the expression of CD95 ligand transcript and protein in human placenta
Zorzi, Willy ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Placenta (1998), 19(4), 269-277

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it ... [more ▼]

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it appears to be controlled by multiple mechanisms. CD95 ligand (CD95-L), which can trigger death of CD95-positive cells by apoptosis, may participate in inducing anti-fetus-sensitized CD95-positive T lymphocytes to enter apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry (first trimester and term placentae), FAGS assays (term placenta) and RT-PCR assays (term placenta), the presence of CD95-L protein and mRNA has been shown in crude placental tissue preparations and isolated placental cells. Among the latter, CD95-L expression was detected in trophoblastic cells, fetal blood cells (mRNA only) and also the Hofbauer macrophages. No CD95-L was detected in fibroblasts or fetal endothelial cells. Thus trophoblastic cells, Hofbauer macrophages, and perhaps also fetal blood cells could form a sequential barrier blocking maternal activated defence cells bearing CD95 molecules. (C) 1998 W. B. Saunders Company Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailBoth Pituitary and Placental Growth Hormone Transcripts Are Expressed in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (Pbmc)
Melen-Lamalle, Laurence ULg; Hennen, Georges ULg; Dullaart, R. P. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1997), 110(2), 336-40

The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered ... [more ▼]

The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at the end of pregnancy. In this study we investigated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis hGH-N, and hGH-V, gene expression in PBMC in men, women and pregnant women. We have demonstrated that hGH-N and hGH-V transcripts are simultaneously produced by PBMC in both men and women as well as pregnant women. The PBMC of a PIT-1-negative woman expressed only the hGH-V transcript, but not the hGH-N one as expected. In conclusion, hGH-V mRNA is expressed by cells other than the syncytiotrophoblast, is not regulated by PIT-1, and may be involved in immune regulation, as is pituitary GH. [less ▲]

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