References of "Haubruge, Eric"
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See detailInvestigation of carbohydrate binding property of a fungal lectin from Xerocomus chrysenteron and potential use on Myzus persicae aphid.
Jaber, Karimi; Cuartero Diaz, Gaetan; Haubruge, Eric ULiege et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2008), 73(3), 629-38

In recent years encoding insecticidal Lectins have been suggested as one of the promising methods against insect pests and have been engineered successfully into a variety of crops including wheat, rice ... [more ▼]

In recent years encoding insecticidal Lectins have been suggested as one of the promising methods against insect pests and have been engineered successfully into a variety of crops including wheat, rice, tobacco and potatoes. Xerocomus chrysenteron Lectin (XCL) has a high hemagglutinating activity and results obtained from sugar specificity assay showed to have specific affinity to Galactose and N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). In previous studies, XCL was shown to have negative effects on some insect pests, including aphids. In the present study, the effects of different carbohydrates including D-glucose, D-mannose, D-galactose and GalNAc, associated with 0.1% XCL (w/v) in artificial diet was investigated to assess the evolution of the lectin toxicity toward Myzus persicae aphid during 7 days. M. persicae, a polyphagous aphid, showed no significant differences of mortality when fed with the XCL lectin associated with Glucose and Mannose or fed on XCL diet only. At the opposite, the mortality rates related to artificial diet supplemented with Galactose or GalNAc and XCL were significantly reduced. There was then a significant mortality difference between M. persicae fed on an artificial diet incorporated specific carbohydrate binding Lectin with those fed with lectin only. The potential use of this particular fungal Lectin (XCL) with more specific carbohydrate binding will be discussed in relation to the development of bio-insecticide and integrated pest management. [less ▲]

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See detailDensity-Dependent Reproductive Success In Tribolium Castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera : Tenebrionidae)
Assie, L. K.; Brostaux, Yves ULiege; Haubruge, Eric ULiege

in Journal of Stored Products Research (2008), 44(3), 285-289

Two strains of Tribolium castaneum, one being susceptible to malathion (Asm) and the other malathion-specific resistant (PRm), were used to assess the effect of population density and its interaction with ... [more ▼]

Two strains of Tribolium castaneum, one being susceptible to malathion (Asm) and the other malathion-specific resistant (PRm), were used to assess the effect of population density and its interaction with genetic background in reproductive success. A highly significant allometric relationship between female body weight and fecundity (R2=0.413) and another between female body weight and larval survivorship (R2=0.561) were found. Data showed that population density exerted an indirect effect on the reproductive success. The body weight of the Asm female was not affected by variations in population density but the body weight of the PRm female increased with reduced population density. The genetic background (strain) and/or malathion-specific resistance greatly influenced reproductive success. Concerning the percentage survivorship of offspring of the two strains, there was an opposite trend with increased population density: in PRm, survivorship was lower at high density (76.64±13.75; mean±SD) and higher at low density (88.39±7.61), whereas in Asm, survivorship was higher at high density (53.39±15.57) and lower at low density (43.99±20.08). The PRm female laid more eggs than the Asm. Reproductive success was significantly higher in PRm than in Asm. In addition, the genetic background (the strain) and/or the pleiotropic effect of malathion-specific resistance had a significant effect on the fecundity of PRm because the differences in fecundity and reproductive success between Asm and PRm went beyond the body weight of the female and might be explained by their genetic background and/or the pleiotropic effect of malathion-specific resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailThe fungal hypotheses (chapter 5.1)
Chasseur, Camille; Lognay, Georges ULiege; Suetens, Carl et al

in Big Bone Disease : A multidisciplinary approach of Kasing-Beck disease in Tibet Autonomous Region (P.R. China) (2008)

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See detailAphid-ant mutualism: an outdoor study of the benefits for Aphis fabae
Verheggen, François ULiege; Detrain, Claire; Diez, Lise et al

Conference (2008)

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See detailAphids adapt their alarm pheromone production according to their social environment
Verheggen, François ULiege; Haubruge, Eric ULiege; Demoraes, Consuelo et al

Poster (2008)

Aphid alarm pheromone—the volatile sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf) in most species—is released in response to predation and other stresses and typically causes nearby aphids who receive the signal to ... [more ▼]

Aphid alarm pheromone—the volatile sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf) in most species—is released in response to predation and other stresses and typically causes nearby aphids who receive the signal to cease feeding, drop from their host plant, and disperse. Because aphid alarm pheromone confers apparent fitness benefits on recipients while its production and release likely entail costs for the emitting aphid, it could be adaptive for aphids to regulate their Eβf production in response to variation in the social environment. To explore this possibility we compared the production of Eβf by Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) individuals reared from first-instar larvae to the adult stage in isolation to that of individuals reared among conspecifics or among individuals of a different aphid species, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Levels of EβF produced in each treatment were assayed by GC-FID quantification of EβF in volatiles collected from crushed aphids. Production of EβF by A. pisum reared in isolation (14.4ng/aphid) was significantly lower than that of aphids reared in a colony of conspecifics (49.1ng/aphid), reared in a M. persicae colony (31.5ng/aphid) or reared among conspecifics of another aaphid clone (52.7ng/aphid). Though A. pisum individuals in our experiments produced less EβF when reared among M. persicae than among conspecifics, this difference was not statistically significant. In a separate experiment we reared A. pisum individuals in isolation and exposed them to the odor of conspecifics. Under these conditions, EβF production was similar to that of aphids reared among conspecifics, suggesting that aphids use volatile cues to assess their social environment and regulate their production of alarm pheromone accordingly. [less ▲]

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See detailAphid-ant mutualism: How do aphids focus ant foraging?
Verheggen, François ULiege; Detrain, Claire; Diez, Lise et al

Conference (2008)

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See detailWhat makes Episyrphus balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae) oviposit on aphid infested tomato plants?
Verheggen, François ULiege; Capella, Quentin ULiege; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULiege et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2008), 73(3), 371-81

Under attack by insect pests, many plant species change their volatile chemical emissions to attract natural enemies. Most of the tomato (Lycopersicon sp., Solanaceae) varieties are subjected to ... [more ▼]

Under attack by insect pests, many plant species change their volatile chemical emissions to attract natural enemies. Most of the tomato (Lycopersicon sp., Solanaceae) varieties are subjected to infestation by molluscs and insects, including the generalist aphid Myzus persicae Sulzer (Homoptera, Aphididae). Episyrphus balteatus De Geer (Diptera: Syrphidae) is a generalist aphid predator that was here observed to lay eggs on M. persicae infested tomato but not on non-infested plants. In order to identify the volatile chemicals that guide the foraging and oviposition behaviour of E. balteatus, we collected and identified volatiles released in the headspace of both aphid infested and uninfested tomato plants by SPME-GC-MS. The identified chemicals were subsequently tested by electroantennography (EAG) on E. balteatus. Monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were identified, the main volatile chemicals being beta-phellandrene, 2-carene, alpha-phellandrene, 3-carene and o-pinene. Electrical depolarizations were observed for each tested monoterpene, with optimal responses ranging from -0.2 to -0.8 mV. Episyrphus balteatus antennae showed dose-response relationships towards all the active chemicals. (E)-beta-farnesene, the main component of the aphid alarm pheromone, was the only active sesquiterpene, and is presumed to act as an oviposition stimulus for E. balteotus. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrimination of parasitized aphids by a hoverfly predator: effects on larval performance, foraging, and oviposition behavior
Almohamad, Raki; Verheggen, François ULiege; Francis, Frédéric ULiege et al

in Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata (2008), 128(1), 73-80

The choice of oviposition site by female aphidophagous predators is crucial for offspring performance, especially in hoverflies whose newly hatched larvae are unable to move over large distance. Predator ... [more ▼]

The choice of oviposition site by female aphidophagous predators is crucial for offspring performance, especially in hoverflies whose newly hatched larvae are unable to move over large distance. Predator and parasitoid interactions within the aphidophagous guild are likely to be very important in influencing the choices made by predatory hoverfly females. In the present study, the foraging and oviposition behavior of the aphidophagous hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera: Syrphidae) was investigated with respect to the parasitized state of its aphid prey, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Homoptera: Aphididae), that were parasitized by Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae). We also recorded the number of eggs laid by hoverfly females when subjected to parasitized aphids. Furthermore, we studied the influence of being fed with parasitized aphids on hoverfly larval performance. Hoverfly females did not exhibit any preference for plants infested with unparasitized or aphids parasitized for 7 days. On the other hand, plants infested with mummies or exuvia were less attractive for E. balteatus. These results were correlated with (i) the number of eggs laid by E. balteatus females and (ii) larval performance. Thus, our results demonstrate that E. balteatus behavior is affected by parasitoid presence through their exploitation of aphid colonies. Indeed, hoverfly predators select their prey according to the developmental state of the parasitoid larvae. [less ▲]

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See detailEmission of alarm pheromone in aphids: A non-contagious phenomenon
Verheggen, François ULiege; Mescher, M. C.; Haubruge, Eric ULiege et al

in Journal of Chemical Ecology (2008), 34(9), 1146-1148

In response to attack by natural enemies, most aphid species release an alarm pheromone that causes nearby conspecifics to cease feeding and disperse. The primary component of the alarm pheromone of most ... [more ▼]

In response to attack by natural enemies, most aphid species release an alarm pheromone that causes nearby conspecifics to cease feeding and disperse. The primary component of the alarm pheromone of most species studied is (E)-beta-farnesene. We recently demonstrated that the production and accumulation of (E)-beta-farnesene during development by juvenile aphids is stimulated by exposure to odor cues, most likely by (E)-beta-farnesene emitted by other colony members. Here, we tested whether the release of (E)-beta-farnesene can be triggered by exposure to the alarm pheromone of other individuals, thereby amplifying the signal. Such contagious emission might be adaptive under some conditions because the amount of (E)-beta-farnesene released by a single aphid may not be sufficient to alert an appropriate number of individuals of the colony to the presence of a potential threat. By using a push-pull headspace collection system, we quantified (E)-beta-farnesene released from Acyrthosiphon pisum aphids exposed to conspecific alarm signals. Typical avoidance behavior was observed following exposure to (E)-beta-farnesene (i.e., aphids ceased feeding and dropped from host-plant); however, no increase in alarm pheromone amount was detected, suggesting that contagious release of (E)-beta-farnesene does not occur. [less ▲]

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See detailMothflies (Diptera : Psychodidae) in hospitals: A guide to their identification and methods for their control
Verheggen, François ULiege; Mignon, Jacques ULiege; Louis, Josiane ULiege et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2008), 63(4), 251-255

Repeated observation of "mothflies" at CHU Brugmann (Horta site hospital in Brussels) is not an isolated incident. Many public buildings have been infested by these Diptera of the Psychodidae Family ... [more ▼]

Repeated observation of "mothflies" at CHU Brugmann (Horta site hospital in Brussels) is not an isolated incident. Many public buildings have been infested by these Diptera of the Psychodidae Family. Although the species currently seen in Belgium is not a danger to human health, any infestation should be swiftly eradicated so as to limit the risks of a massive proliferation, source of hygiene problems and of potential bacterial dissemination. A good knowledge of adult and larval biology allows the potential sites of infestation to be quickly identified. The method to be envisaged to solve the problem will combine different approaches such as removing the risk factors (decomposing organic matter), monitoring egg-laying sites, applying caustic soda-based products and possibly treating with insecticide. [less ▲]

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See detailAphid and plant volatiles induce oviposition in an aphidophagous hoverfly
Verheggen, François ULiege; Arnaud, Ludovic; Bartram, Stefan et al

in Journal of Chemical Ecology (2008), 34(3), 301-307

Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera, Syrphidae) is an abundant and efficient aphid-specific predator. We tested the electroantennographic (EAG) response of this syrphid fly to the common aphid alarm ... [more ▼]

Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera, Syrphidae) is an abundant and efficient aphid-specific predator. We tested the electroantennographic (EAG) response of this syrphid fly to the common aphid alarm pheromone, (E)-beta-farnesene (E beta F), and to several plant volatiles, including terpenoids (mono- and sesquiterpenes) and green leaf volatiles (C6 and C9 alcohols and aldehydes). Monoterpenes evoked significant EAG responses, whereas sesquiterpenes were inactive, except for the aphid alarm pheromone (E beta F). The most pronounced antennal responses were elicited by six and nine carbon green leaf alcohols and aldehydes [i.e., (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-2-hexenol, (E)-2-hexenal, and hexanal]. To investigate the behavioral activity of some of these EAG-active compounds, E. balteatus females were exposed to R-(+)-limonene (monoterpene), (Z)-3-hexenol (green leaf alcohol), and E beta F (sesquiterpene, common aphid alarm pheromone). A single E. balteatus gravid female was exposed for 10 min to an aphid-free Vicia faba plant that was co-located with a semiochemical dispenser. Without additional semiochemical, hoverfly females were not attracted to this plant, and no oviposition was observed. The monoterpene R-(+)-limonene did not affect the females' foraging behavior, whereas (Z)-3-hexenol and E beta F increased the time of flight and acceptance of the host plant. Moreover, these two chemicals induced oviposition on aphid-free plants, suggesting that selection of the oviposition site by predatory hoverflies relies on the perception of a volatile blend composed of prey pheromone and typical plant green leaf volatiles. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of aphid salivary proteins: a proteomic investigation of Myzus persicae.
Harmel, Nicolas ULiege; Letocart, E.; Cherqui, A. et al

in Insect Molecular Biology (2008), 17(2), 165-74

The role of insect saliva in the first contact between an insect and a plant is crucial during feeding. Some elicitors, particularly in insect regurgitants, have been identified as inducing plant defence ... [more ▼]

The role of insect saliva in the first contact between an insect and a plant is crucial during feeding. Some elicitors, particularly in insect regurgitants, have been identified as inducing plant defence reactions. Here, we focused on the salivary proteome of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Proteins were either directly in-solution digested or were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE before trypsin digestion. Resulting peptides were then identified by mass spectrometry coupled with database investigations. A homemade database was constituted of expressed sequence tags from the pea aphid Acyrtosiphon pisum and M. persicae. The databases were used to identify proteins related to M. persicae with a nonsequenced genome. This procedure enabled us to discover glucose oxidase, glucose dehydrogenase, NADH dehydrogenase, alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase in M. persicae saliva. The presence of these enzymes is discussed in terms of plant-aphid interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailPurification and characterization of a carboxylesterase involved in malathion-specific resistance from Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).
Amichot, Marcel; Haubruge, Eric ULiege; Bergé, Jean-Baptiste et al

in Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2008), 32

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See detailAphid – ant mutualism : How do aphids focus ant foraging ?
Verheggen, François ULiege; Diez, Lise; Detrain, Claire et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailRole of prey–host plant associations on Harmonia axyridis and Episyrphus balteatus field distribution and efficiency.
Alhmedi, Ammar; Haubruge, Eric ULiege; Francis, Frédéric ULiege

in Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata (2008), 128

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See detailEmission of alarm pheromone in aphids: A contagious phenomenon?
Verheggen, François ULiege; Mescher, Mark; Francis, Frédéric ULiege et al

Poster (2008)

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