References of "Haubruge, Eric"
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See detailIs the (E)-ß-farnesene only volatile terpenoid in aphids?
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Vandermoten, Sophie ULg; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Journal of Applied Entomology (2005), 129

Herbivore insects use a broad range of chemical cues to locate their host to feed or to oviposit. Whether several plant volatiles are effective allelochemicals for insects, the latter also emit molecules ... [more ▼]

Herbivore insects use a broad range of chemical cues to locate their host to feed or to oviposit. Whether several plant volatiles are effective allelochemicals for insects, the latter also emit molecules which have infochemical role. The (E)-beta-farnesene (EBF) is a well-known aphid alarm pheromone commonly found in all previously tested species. Analysis of the released molecules from 23 aphid species, mainly collected on their natural host plant from May to July, was performed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. While EBF was identified as the main volatile substance in 16 species, alone or associated with other molecules, the alarm pheromone was only a minor component of the volatile molecule pattern of five other species. Moreover, two species, Euceraphis punctipennis and Drepanosiphum platanoides, did not release EBF at all but other terpenes were identified. This original observation raised the question on the utility and the source of the non-EBF volatiles. Are these potential infochemical substances produced by the aphid or only absorbed from the host plant? Here we determined that terpenes released by insects were not only provided by the host plants. Indeed, Megoura viciae emitted additional molecules than the ones from several aphid species reared on the same host plant. Moreover, no systematic relation between the feeding behaviour of the aphid species and the volatile releases was observed. Aphid terpene composition and proportion would provide reliable cues to identify the emitting organism, plant or insect. The next step of this work will be to determine the infochemical role of terpenes found in the range of tested aphid samples to better understand the relations between the different tritrophic levels. [less ▲]

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See detailPerception of aphid infested tomato plant volatiles by the predator Episyrphus balteatus
Verheggen, François ULg; Arnaud, Ludovic; Capella, Quentin et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2005)

In a tritrophic interaction including tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller), the herbivore Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and the predator Episyrphus balteatus (De Geer), the perception of the tomato ... [more ▼]

In a tritrophic interaction including tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller), the herbivore Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and the predator Episyrphus balteatus (De Geer), the perception of the tomato plants produced volatile organic compounds (VOC) by Episyrphus balteatus is investigated. In a first step, an odour sampling device has been set up aiming the headspace collection of the tomato plant VOC and their adsorption on Tenax adsorbent cartridges (Supelco®). Following desorption is held using a thermodesorption injector (Gerstel®) coupled with GC-MS. Intact and aphid infested plants are studied for their VOC emissions, as well as the comparison of the VOC emission of different tomato cultivars. These VOC consist mainly in mono- and sesquiterpenes (such as - and -pinene ; -humulene ; …) as well as in C6-volatiles like hexenal in case of infestation by herbivores Once the tomato plants VOC identified and quantified, they are tested for their perception by Episyrphus balteatus using electroantennography (EAG). Accordingly, an EAG device has been installed and configured for the study of VOC using Diptera antennas. The monoterpenes limonene and linalool showed high EAG activity whereas other terpenes like cymene seem to be inactive. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic approach to investigate plant – aphid interactions
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Gerkens, Pascal; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

Conference (2005)

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See detailIndirect defence of aphid infested potato : role of terpenes on Episyrphus balteatus behaviour
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Harmel, Nicolas; Almohamad, Raki et al

in Abstract book (2005)

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See detailCaractérisation de la farnésyle pyrophosphate synthase de pucerons
Beliveau, Catherine; Vandermoten, Sophie ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2004, November)

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See detailOlfactory responses to aphid and host plant volatile releases: (E)-beta-farnesene an effective kairomone for the predator Adalia bipunctata.
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Lognay, Georges ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg

in Journal of Chemical Ecology (2004), 30(4), 741-55

The volatiles released from several aphid and host plant species, alone or associated, were studied for their infochemical role in prey location. Using a four-arm olfactometer, the attraction of several ... [more ▼]

The volatiles released from several aphid and host plant species, alone or associated, were studied for their infochemical role in prey location. Using a four-arm olfactometer, the attraction of several combinations of three aphid (Myzus persicae, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Brevicoryne brassicae) and three plant (Vicia faba, Brassica napus, and Sinapis alba) species toward Adalia bipunctata larvae and adults was observed. Both predatory larvae and adults were attracted only by A. pisum and M. persicae when they were crushed, whatever the host plant. (E)-beta-farnesene, the aphid alarm pheromone, was the effective kairomone for the ladybird. Plant leaves alone (V. faba, B. napus, and S. alba) or in association with nonstressed whole aphids (the three species) did not have any attraction for the predator. The B. brassicae specialist aphid is the only prey that was not attracted to A. bipunctata larvae and adults, even if they were crushed. Release of B. brassicae molecules similar to the host plant allelochemicals was demonstrated by GC-MS analysis. The lack of behavioral response of the ladybird at short distance toward the cruciferous specialist aphid was related only to the absence of (E)-beta-farnesene in the aphid prey volatile pattern. [less ▲]

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See detailPurification and characterization of glutathione S-transferases from two syrphid flies (Syrphus ribesii and Myathropa florae).
Vanhaelen, Nicolas; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part B (2004), 137(1), 95-100

Glutathione S-transferases (GST) play an important role in the detoxification of many substances including organic pollutants and plant secondary metabolites. We compared the GST of two syrphid species ... [more ▼]

Glutathione S-transferases (GST) play an important role in the detoxification of many substances including organic pollutants and plant secondary metabolites. We compared the GST of two syrphid species, the aphidophagous Syrphus ribesii and the saprophagous Myathropa florea to assess the relation between feeding type and GST patterns. Differences between the GST of the hoverfly species were observed after purification by affinity chromatography, SDS-PAGE and kinetic studies. While the specific activities of the purified enzymes were different, the purification yields were similar. The variation in specific activities was related to the presence of different isoenzymes in both syrphid species by SDS-PAGE. While two bands of 24 and 32 kDa were observed for M. florea, one more band of 26 kDa was present in S. ribesii. When a range of substrate and glutathione concentrations was tested, differences in Km and Vmax between the glutathione S-transferases from both hoverfly species were also observed. These results are discussed in terms of adaptations to the feeding habit and the habitat of the two syrphid species. [less ▲]

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See detailMélanges fleuris et insectes auxiliaires
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Colignon, P.; Haubruge, Eric ULg

in Canard Déchaîné du Kauwberg (Le) (2004), 50

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See detailLe dépérissement des abeilles en Wallonie
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg

Article for general public (2004)

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See detailTournières, jachères et insectes auxiliaires
Colignon, Pierre; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Gaspar, Charles et al

Article for general public (2003)

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See detailEffet des bordures de champs sur les populations de Chrysopes en cultures maraîchères
Mignon, Jacques ULg; Colignon, Pierre; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in Phytoprotection (2003), 84(2), 121-128

Both diversity and density of lacewings depend on prey availability but also on plant composition near crops. The impact of field borders vegetation on abundance and diversity of Syrphidae and ... [more ▼]

Both diversity and density of lacewings depend on prey availability but also on plant composition near crops. The impact of field borders vegetation on abundance and diversity of Syrphidae and Coccinellidae is well known but very few studies have been realised to assess its effect on the abundance and diversity of Chrysopidae. In 2000 and 2001, the impact of adjacent habitats on lacewing populations was investigated in both carrot and broad bean open fields. Three types of field borders were selected: (1) set-asides mainly composed by Lolium perenne and Trifolium spp., (2) crops (wheat, beet or other vegetables) and (3) woody areas (mixture of Acer sp., Populus sp. and Salix sp.). Insects were caught using yellow pan traps. Chrysopidae populations were shown to be significantly lower in carrot and broad bean fields bordered with woodland. Lacewing and other Neuroptera species richness were always low and were discussed in relation with their role of pest predators associated with other aphidophagous insects. [less ▲]

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See detailNote sur les hétéroptères des cultures maraîchères de plein champ
Colignon, P.; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg

in Notes Fauniques de Gembloux (2003), 51

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See detailTechnique de lombriculture au Sud Vietnam
Francis, Frédéric ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Pham Tat Thang et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2003), 7(3-4), 171-175

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See detailMycotoxins in stored Barley (Hordeum vulgare) in Tibet Autonomous Region (People’s Republic of China.
Haubruge, Eric ULg; Chasseur, Camille

in Mountain Research & Development (2003), 23

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