References of "Hansez, Isabelle"
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See detailValidation of the french version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among physicians
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg et al

in Psycho-oncology (2010, May), 19(Suppl.2)(1-313), 249

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See detailLe role des objets-frontière dans le découpage temporel et social d'une innovation de service : Etude de cas d'un transfert de technologie depuis un laboratoire universitaire de sciences sociales
Peters, Stéphanie ULg; Faulx, Daniel ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

in Revue d'anthropologie des connaissances (2010), 4(1), 65-86

Aujourd’hui, les objets se voient attribuer un rôle important dans l’analyse des dynamiques sociales, notamment au travers des mécanismes de coordination entre les acteurs humains. Le concept d’objet ... [more ▼]

Aujourd’hui, les objets se voient attribuer un rôle important dans l’analyse des dynamiques sociales, notamment au travers des mécanismes de coordination entre les acteurs humains. Le concept d’objet-frontière a, pour sa part, permis d’enrichir l’approche de l’innovation. Cet article vise à illustrer le rôle des objets-frontière dans le découpage temporel et social d’une innovation de service. Une enquête de type ethnographique a été menée dans un laboratoire de recherche afin d’analyser le processus de partage et de diffusion d’un outil de diagnostic du stress et de l’expertise qui lui est associée. Ce cas permet de montrer le rôle des objets-frontière d’une part dans la réduction de l’incertitude inhérente à tout processus innovant (découpage temporel) et, d’autre part, dans la définition d’un service innovant (découpage social). [less ▲]

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See detailMoving European research on work and ageing forward : Overview and agenda
Schalk, R.; van Veldhoven, M.; de Lange, A. et al

in European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology (2010), 19(1), 76-101

This article summarizes the state of affairs of European research on ageing and work. After a close inspection of the age construct, an overview is presented of research in four areas: the relationship ... [more ▼]

This article summarizes the state of affairs of European research on ageing and work. After a close inspection of the age construct, an overview is presented of research in four areas: the relationship between age and HR-policies, early retirement, age and performance/employability, age and health/well-being. The overview results in a research agenda on work and ageing and in recommendations for practice. [less ▲]

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See detailPredictors and correlates of burnout in residents working with cancer patients
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Libert, Yves et al

in Journal of Cancer Education (2010)

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See detailLe maintien dans l’emploi des travailleurs âgés dans trois entreprises belges
Bertrand, Françoise ULg; Lemaire, C.; Barbier, Marie ULg et al

in Relations Industrielles = Industrial Relations (2010), 65(3), 400-423

Future economic growth requires the employment of a greater number of workers above 55 years old. To deal with this increasing problem, it is important to identify the preferred solutions of older workers ... [more ▼]

Future economic growth requires the employment of a greater number of workers above 55 years old. To deal with this increasing problem, it is important to identify the preferred solutions of older workers in order to promote the retention of these workers in their jobs. Older workers of three enterprises have been interrogated on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the best solutions for the workers. A distinction was made between the solutions proposed by the literature and those proposed by the workers in a spontaneous way. We also tried to determine whether the solutions differed as a function of socio-professional category, working time and type of working hours. Finally, this study determined the actions that need to be undertaken: actions regarding discrimination, working conditions, working time and professional development. In particular, this study established that the actions against discrimination are requested more by manual workers, part-time workers and those with variable hours. Therefore, we suggest that the requests of manual workers should be considered differently from those of executives. The latter are searching for more opportunities for development, whereas the manual workers prefer an improvement of working conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailFacteurs d'insatisfaction incitant au départ et intention de quitter le travail : analyse comparative des groupes d'âge.
Bertrand, Françoise ULg; Peters, Stéphanie ULg; Pérée, Francis ULg et al

in Travail Humain (Le) (2010), 73(1), 215-239

The aim of this paper is to identify reasons why workers would resign from their jobs early and to what extent the reasons for retirement are really encountered. A number of non satisfaction factors ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to identify reasons why workers would resign from their jobs early and to what extent the reasons for retirement are really encountered. A number of non satisfaction factors either personal or job-related were considered in an age comparison dimension. A questionnaire has been elaborated for the purpose of this study and includes items related to job intention to quit and (potential vs encountered) non satisfaction factors. These factors consider both personal leaving factors and job related leaving factors. The latter include three theoretical sub-dimensions: working conditions, organizational and structural changes and job recognition. Exploratory factor analysis of the 58 items produced eight usable leaving factors: (1) lack of resources and autonomy; (2) work pressure; (3) lack of personal development; (4) job insecurity; (5) personal reasons; (6) organizational changes; (7) a hostile work environment and (8) a poor image of the company. The sample includes 1772 workers from 11 Belgian companies. The response rate is 50.23 per cent. All sectors of activity are included in the survey. We consider five categories of age (under 25 years old, between 25 and 35, between 36 and 45, between 45 and 55, and over 55 years). As far as the results are concerned, first of all, organizational changes encountered by a large majority of workers appear to be an important leaving factor, especially for older workers. Second the lack of personal development, though experienced by the oldest workers in a larger extent, is the main reason for leaving in all age groups. Third personal factors are also important for the younger and the oldest workers. Moreover work pressure is a phenomenon encountered by all workers, particularly the youngest, but it is less of a reason for leaving. Another result is that job insecurity factor is experienced by youngest workers. Finally, the differences between the young and the not so young are not very clear-cut, supporting the idea of the age management perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety Behavior: Job Demands, Job Resources, and Perceived Management Commitment to Safety
Hansez, Isabelle ULg; Chmiel, Nik

in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (2010), 15(3), 267-278

The job demands-resources model posits that job demands and resources influence outcomes through job strain and work engagement processes. We test whether the model can be extended to effort-related ... [more ▼]

The job demands-resources model posits that job demands and resources influence outcomes through job strain and work engagement processes. We test whether the model can be extended to effort-related “routine” safety violations and “situational” safety violations provoked by the organization. In addition we test more directly the involvement of job strain than previous studies which have used burnout measures. Structural equation modeling provided, for the first time, evidence of predicted relationships between job strain and “routine” violations and work engagement with “routine” and “situational” violations, thereby supporting the extension of the job demands-resources model to safety behaviors. In addition our results showed that a key safety specific construct ‘perceived management commitment to safety’ added to the explanatory power of the job demands-resources model. A predicted path from job resources to perceived management commitment to safety was highly significant, supporting the view that job resources can influence safety behavior through both general motivational involvement in work (work engagement) and through safety-specific processes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of expectations on commitment of newcomers.
Bertrand, Françoise ULg; Tibbax, V.; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2009, November 05)

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See detailProfessional acts and services rendered by psychologists : a Belgian study.
Hansez, Isabelle ULg; Mormont, Marie; Côte, Virginie

Conference (2009, July 10)

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See detailA test of the Job Demands-Resources model: A social identity theory perspective.
Barbier, Marie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2009, June 03)

The Job Demands-Resources mode has given rise to numerous studies aimed at a better understanding of positive and negative aspects of wellbeing at work. The existence of a motivational and an energetic ... [more ▼]

The Job Demands-Resources mode has given rise to numerous studies aimed at a better understanding of positive and negative aspects of wellbeing at work. The existence of a motivational and an energetic process leading to, respectively, engagement and exhaustion has been demonstrated. The aim of our study is to test this model using predictors derived from Social Identity Theory (or SIT). We hypothesize that working in a negatively valued occupation is associated with exhaustion and health problems, whereas a high identification with one’s occupational group is associated to engagement and low intent to quit the organisation (or IQ). Structural equation modelling was performed on data collected in a public administration (N = 954). We collected measures of occupation value, group identification, exhaustion, engagement, health problems and IQ. Items were parcelled based on their skewness. Excepted from Chi² being significant (p = .00), fit indices were satisfactory. The link between engagement and IQ is not significant but all other links go in the expected direction. We conclude that a test of the JDR model using SIT brings conclusive results. As a further step, it might be interesting to test interactive effects: results suggest that identification might buffer the relation between occupation value and exhaustion. Second, it might be interesting to introduce boundaries permeability, another key concept of SIT, as a third predictor. [less ▲]

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See detailExtending the job Demands-Resources Model : safety behaviour and perceived safety climate.
Hansez, Isabelle ULg; Chmiel, N.

Conference (2009, May 16)

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See detailA test of the Job Demands-Resources model with alternative measures of strain and well-being
Barbier, Marie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2009, May)

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the Job Demands-Resources model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner & Schaufeli, 2001) has given rise to numerous studies aimed at a better understanding of positive ... [more ▼]

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the Job Demands-Resources model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner & Schaufeli, 2001) has given rise to numerous studies aimed at a better understanding of positive and negative aspects of wellbeing at work. The existence of a motivational and an energetic process leading to, respectively, engagement and strain has been demonstrated several times, as well as cross-links between the two. However, these studies mainly rely on two measurement tools: the MBI-GS as a measure of strain and the UWES as a measure of engagement. The aim of our study is to test the model using alternative measures. Strain was measured using the NOSI subscale, and engagement using the POSI subscale of the PNOSI, a new tool measuring positive and negative wellbeing. Structural and external validity of this tool have been demonstrated previously (Barbier, Peters & Hansez, submitted). According to the JDR model, we hypothesise that high job demands would lead to strain and then to health problems. Our second hypothesis is that job resources would lead to engagement and then to low intent to leave. Structural equation modelling was performed using Lisrel 8.80 on 954 data collected in a Belgian public institution. As regards to measurement model, results show that a six-factor model (demands, resources, strain, engagement, health problems and intent to quit or IQ) shows good fit to data. We first tested the traditional JDR model, but it showed bad fit. Fit was improved when adding a path from resources to strain, from strain to IQ and from engagement to health problems. This alternative model showed better fit than the initial one. This study makes three main contributions. First, it tests the well-established JDR model using alternative measures of positive and negative sides of well-being. Second, it asks questions as to the respective outcomes of strain and engagement. More specifically, the path between engagement and IQ became not significant when a path from strain to IQ was added. That is, IQ seems to be more a product of strain than of (lack of) engagement. Finally, it emphasizes the important role of resources. It may be that the link between resources and low IQ would be mediated by low level of strain rather than by high level of engagement. Similarly, the relation between engagement and health problem is positive, which raises questions as to the pre-supposed positive effects of engagement. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring positive and negative aspects of well-being at work: Intern and extern validity of the PNOSI.
Barbier, Marie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2009, May)

With the emergence of positive psychology, research interest in workers positive responses to work conditions has gained ground fast. In the beginning of the 21st century, our unit developed the PNOSI, a ... [more ▼]

With the emergence of positive psychology, research interest in workers positive responses to work conditions has gained ground fast. In the beginning of the 21st century, our unit developed the PNOSI, a new tool for measuring Positive and Negative Occupational Stress. Negative occupational stress was defined as the response of workers facing demands they feel they have to manage but for which they doubt necessary resources are available. Positive occupational stress was defined as the response of workers facing demands they feel they have to manage and for which they perceive necessary resources are available. Exploratory analyses (Barbier & Hansez, 2008) have identified a two-factor structure, one measuring Positive Occupational Stress (POSI) and the other measuring Negative Occupational Stress (NOSI). The following research has two goals: establishing PNOSI intern structure through a cross-validation strategy using calibration and validation samples (goal 1), and testing its convergent and discriminant validity (goal 2). As regards to goal 1, structural equation modelling using Lisrel 8.80 was performed on 2,713 data collected in a Belgian electricity company. Results show that the two-factor solution suits data best than an alternative one “wellbeing” factor solution. Moreover, eliminating two items leads to better fit. We then fitted this reduced two-factor structure on more than 15,000 data collected in six companies. Results show that the reduced two-factor solution should be preferred to the alternative one in all six samples. PNOSI intern structure is thus replicated. As regards to goal 2, we calculated correlations between NOSI and POSI scales, and constructs of burnout, engagement, workaholism and commitment. Data were collected in a Belgian public institution (N = 954). NOSI was moderately correlated to our burnout measure, and can thus be considered as a different, even if related, construct. POSI was highly correlated to our measure of engagement, challenging our hypothesis that the two are different constructs. Finally, NOSI was moderately and negatively correlated to commitment and positively correlated to workaholism, whereas the reverse was true for POSI. It seems thus that NOSI is distinct from burnout, workaholism and commitment, whereas POSI is distinct from workaholism and commitment. To conclude, we can say that PNOSI two-factor structure is established. NOSI shows convergent validity with the similar construct of burnout, but is distinct from it. Results are less clear concerning POSI and engagement. Finally, NOSI and POSI are differently related to constructs of commitment and workaholism; their discriminant validity is thus established. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (14 ULg)