References of "Hanikenne, Marc"
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See detailZinc hyperaccumulation: a model to examine metal homeostasis in plants
Hanikenne, Marc ULg; Nouet, Cécile ULg; Charlier, Jean-Benoit et al

Conference (2012, September 20)

The plant Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected metal hypertolerance and extraordinarily high levels of leaf metal accumulation. Metal hyperaccumulator species attract interest as they represent ... [more ▼]

The plant Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected metal hypertolerance and extraordinarily high levels of leaf metal accumulation. Metal hyperaccumulator species attract interest as they represent an extreme end of natural variation of the metal homeostasis network. This might be useful to reveal the global functioning of metal homeostasis networks and uncover key nodes whose alterations can drastically modify metal accumulation and tolerance. In addition, metal hyperaccumulation is a compelling model to study adaptation. In the last few years, major progress has been achieved in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying metal hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. High rates of metal uptake by roots, root-to-shoot translocation and efficient shoot vacuolar sequestration play central roles in determining hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance. Enhanced functions of several metal transporter-encoding genes result from gene copy number amplification and/or (cis)-regulatory changes. We will describe the function of several transporters in zinc and cadmium hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance, and in the adjustment of nutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Recent work aiming to determine if selection acted during the evolutionary history of A. halleri on a loci required for metal tolerance and accumulation will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailPlants and algae metal homeostasis in Liège
Hanikenne, Marc ULg

Conference (2012, July 05)

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See detailFunctional study of Arabidopsis thaliana ASF/SF2-like pre-mRNA SR splicing factors
Stankovic, Nancy ULg; Tillemans, Vinciane; Leponce, Isabelle et al

Poster (2012, July 04)

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See detailEvolution of Metal Hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri
Hanikenne, Marc ULg; Kroymann, Juergen; Bernal, Maria et al

Conference (2012, February 06)

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See detailA Single Ancient Origin for Prototypical Serine/Arginine-Rich Splicing Factors1[W][OA]
Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis ULg; Hanikenne, Marc ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2012), 158(2), 546-560

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have ... [more ▼]

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RRM domain and a C-terminal region enriched in Ser/Arg dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for >12,000 RRM domains representing >200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalogue SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors, while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. [less ▲]

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See detailMetal response of transgenic tomato plants expressing P1B-ATPase
Barabasz, Anna; Wilkowska, Anna; Ruszczyńska, Anna et al

in Physiologia Plantarum (2012), 145

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See detailPromoter analysis of the three HMA4 copies in the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri
Nouet, Cécile ULg; Cebula, Justyna; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2011, August)

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See detailExpression of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in two Arabidopsis species
Charlier, Jean-Benoît ULg; Polese, Catherine ULg; Krämer, Ute et al

Poster (2011, August)

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See detailRSZ22, a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling SR splicing factor
Tillemans, Vinciane ULg; Rausin, Glwadys; Stankovic, Nancy ULg et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailMetal homeostasis in hyperaccumulating plants and algae
Hanikenne, Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2011, February 04)

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See detailMetal hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance: a model for plant evolutionary genomics
Hanikenne, Marc ULg; Nouet, Cécile ULg

in Current Opinion in Plant Biology (2011), 14

In the course of evolution, plants adapted to major variations in metal availability in soils and therefore represent an important source of natural diversity of metal homeostasis networks. Thus, research ... [more ▼]

In the course of evolution, plants adapted to major variations in metal availability in soils and therefore represent an important source of natural diversity of metal homeostasis networks. Thus, research on plant metal homeostasis can provide insights into the functioning, regulation and adaptations of biological networks. Here, we describe major breakthroughs in our understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of metal hyperaccumulation and associated hypertolerance, a naturally selected complex trait which represents an extreme adaptation of the metal homeostasis network. Investigations in this field reveal further the molecular alterations underlying the evolution of natural phenotypic diversity and provide a highly relevant framework for comparative genomics. [less ▲]

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See detailChloroplastic and mitochondrial metal homeostasis.
Nouet, Cécile ULg; Motte, Patrick ULg; Hanikenne, Marc ULg

in Trends in Plant Science (2011), 16(7), 395-404

Transition metal deficiency has a strong impact on the growth and survival of an organism. Indeed, transition metals, such as iron, copper, manganese and zinc, constitute essential cofactors for many key ... [more ▼]

Transition metal deficiency has a strong impact on the growth and survival of an organism. Indeed, transition metals, such as iron, copper, manganese and zinc, constitute essential cofactors for many key cellular functions. Both photosynthesis and respiration rely on metal cofactor-mediated electron transport chains. Chloroplasts and mitochondria are, therefore, organelles with high metal ion demand and represent essential components of the metal homeostasis network in photosynthetic cells. In this review, we describe the metal requirements of chloroplasts and mitochondria, the acclimation of their functions to metal deficiency and recent advances in our understanding of their contributions to cellular metal homeostasis, the control of the cellular redox status and the synthesis of metal cofactors. [less ▲]

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See detailMetal hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: How is Zinc accumulating in the leaves?
Hanikenne, Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2010, September 17)

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See detailDynamic Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR Splicing Factor: Role of the RNA-Binding Domains
Rausin, Glwadys ULg; Tillemans, Vinciane ULg; Stankovic, Nancy ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2010), 153

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a ... [more ▼]

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in two Arabidopsis species
Charlier, Jean-Benoit ULg; Polese, Catherine; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2010, January 26)

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See detailKnock-down of the COX3 and COX17 gene expression of cytochrome c oxidase in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Remacle, Claire ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg; Jans, Frédéric ULg et al

in Plant Molecular Biology (2010), 74(3), 223-2363

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated ... [more ▼]

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated by RNA interference in the microalga Chlamydomonas. The COX3 mRNA was completely lacking in the cox3-RNAi mutant and no activity and assembly of complex IV were detected. The cox17-RNAi mutant presented a reduced level of COX17 mRNA, a reduced activity of the cytochrome c oxidase but no modification of its amount. The cox3-RNAi mutant had only 40% of the wild-type rate of dark respiration which was cyanide-insensitive. The mutant presented a 60% decrease of H(2)O(2) production in the dark compared to wild type, which probably accounts for a reduced electron leakage by respiratory complexes III and IV. In contrast, the cox17-RNAi mutant showed no modification of respiration and of H(2)O(2) production in the dark but a two to threefold increase of H(2)O(2) in the light compared to wild type and the cox3-RNAi mutant. The cox17-RNAi mutant was more sensitive to cadmium than the wild-type and cox3-RNAi strains. This suggested that besides its role in complex IV assembly, Cox17 could have additional functions in the cell such as metal detoxification or Reactive Oxygen Species protection or signaling. Concerning Cox3, its role in Chlamydomonas complex IV is similar to that of other eukaryotes although this subunit is encoded in the nuclear genome in the alga contrary to the situation found in all other organisms. [less ▲]

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See detailMetal accumulation in tobacco expressing Arabidopsis halleri metal hyperaccumulation gene depends on external supply.
Barabasz, Anna; Krämer, Ute; Hanikenne, Marc ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Botany (2010), 61(11), 3057-67

Engineering enhanced transport of zinc to the aerial parts of plants is a major goal in bio-fortification. In Arabidopsis halleri, high constitutive expression of the AhHMA4 gene encoding a metal pump of ... [more ▼]

Engineering enhanced transport of zinc to the aerial parts of plants is a major goal in bio-fortification. In Arabidopsis halleri, high constitutive expression of the AhHMA4 gene encoding a metal pump of the P(1B)-ATPase family is necessary for both Zn hyperaccumulation and the full extent of Zn and Cd hypertolerance that are characteristic of this species. In this study, an AhHMA4 cDNA was introduced into N. tabacum var. Xanthi for expression under the control of its endogenous A. halleri promoter known to confer high and cell-type specific expression levels in both A. halleri and the non-hyperaccumulator A. thaliana. The transgene was expressed at similar levels in both roots and shoots upon long-term exposure to low Zn, control, and increased Zn concentrations. A down-regulation of AhHMA4 transcript levels was detected with 10 muM Zn resupply to tobacco plants cultivated in low Zn concentrations. In general, a transcriptional regulation of AhHMA4 in tobacco contrasted with the constitutively high expression previously observed in A. halleri. Differences in root/shoot partitioning of Zn and Cd between transgenic lines and the wild type were strongly dependent on metal concentrations in the hydroponic medium. Under low Zn conditions, an increased Zn accumulation in the upper leaves in the AhHMA4-expressing lines was detected. Moreover, transgenic plants exposed to cadmium accumulated less metal than the wild type. Both modifications of zinc and cadmium accumulation are noteworthy outcomes from the biofortification perspective and healthy food production. Expression of AhHMA4 may be useful in crops grown on soils poor in Zn. [less ▲]

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