References of "HUSTINX, Roland"
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See detailFluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography
Couturier, Olivier; Luxen, André ULg; Chatal, Jean-François et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2004), 31(8), 1182-1206

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET ... [more ▼]

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes "generalist" tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of "specific" tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell hypoxia or bone metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis with 18F-FDG PET
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Ribbens, Clio ULg; Andre, Béatrice ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(6), 956-964

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters with clinical, biologic, and sonographic (US) rheumatoid parameters. Methods: Three hundred fifty-six joints were assessed in 21 patients with active RA: the knees in all subjects and either wrists as well as metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in 13 patients, or ankles and the first metatarsophalangeal joints in the remaining 8 patients. PET analysis consisted of a visual identification of F-18-FDG uptake in the synovium and measurements of standardized uptake values (SUVs). Independent assessors performed the clinical and US examinations. Results: PET positivity was found in 63% of joints, whereas 75%, 79%, and 56% were positive for swelling, tenderness, and US analysis, respectively. Both the rate of PET-positive joints and the SUV increased with the number of positive parameters present (swelling, tenderness, US positivity) and with the synovial thickness. The mean SUV was significantly higher in joints where a power Doppler signal was found. In a global PET analysis, the number of PET-positive joints and the cumulative SUV were significantly correlated with the swollen and tender joint counts, the patient and physician global assessments, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein serum levels, the disease activity score and the simplified disease activity index, the number of US-positive joints, and the cumulative synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique that can assess the metabolic activity of synovitis and measure the disease activity in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of Pet Scanning to the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Sakalihasan, Natzi ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Limet, Raymond ULg

in Seminars in Vascular Surgery (2004), 17(2), 144-53

The size of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is the most usual predictor of the risk for rupture. Because chronic metalloproteinases production and activation by inflammatory cells causes degradation of ... [more ▼]

The size of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is the most usual predictor of the risk for rupture. Because chronic metalloproteinases production and activation by inflammatory cells causes degradation of elastin and collagen in the aneurysmal wall, the detection of an increased metabolic process preceding fissuration and rupture could be a more sensitive predictor of rupture risk. We investigated the metabolic activity of the aneurysmal wall by whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) in 26 patients with a documented AAA (mean diameter 63 mm, extremes 45 mm and 78 mm). A positive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake at the level of the AAA was observed in 38% of the cases (10 of 26 patients). Nine of these 10 patients required emergent or urgent aneurysmectomy for ruptured (n = 1), leaking (n = 1), rapidly expanding (n = 2), or painful (n = 5) aneurysms; the negative (18)F-FDG uptake patients had a more benign course. This preliminary study suggests a possible correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake by the aneurysm wall and the triggering of processes leading to rupture. The (18)F-FDG uptake in the aneurysm wall may correspond to the accumulation of inflammatory cells responsible for the production and activation of degrading enzymes. PET scan seems useful in high-risk patients. Positive PET imaging in these cases would help us to decide to proceed with surgery, despite factors favoring a surveillance strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailWithin-patient variability of F-18-FDG: Standardized uptake values in normal tissues
Paquet, Nancy; Albert, Adelin ULg; Willems, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(5), 784-788

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were determined in 70 cancer-free patients (40 female and 30 male) on 2 occasions an average of 271 d apart. Mean values for body weight and height, blood glucose level, injected dose, and uptake period did not change between the 2 groups of studies. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were placed-on the liver, lung, mediastinum, and trapezius muscle. Mean and maximum SUVs normalized for body weight were obtained, and normalizations were then applied for lean body mass (LBM), LBM and blood glucose level, body surface area (BSA), and BSA and blood glucose level. Results: In the lungs and muscle, metabolic activity within the ROIs was significantly different in the 2 studies, no matter which method was used for the SUVs. The differences ranged from 0.02 to 0.1 for SUV normalized for body weight and SUV normalized for LBM and from 0.001 to 0.002 for SUV normalized for BSA. In the liver, results were similar for all SUVs, except for maximum SUV corrected for LBM and maximum SUV corrected for LBM and blood glucose level. The metabolic activity measured in the mediastinum was also comparable in the 2 studies, regardless of the type of SUV. When investigating whether any normalization method for SUVs reduces variability and improves test-retest concordance, we found no significant superiority for any. The best intraclass correlation coefficients were obtained with the SUV normalized for body weight, in both the liver and the mediastinum, but the coefficients of variation were similar for all 3 mean SUVs that were not corrected for glucose level (range, 10.8%-13.4%). However, normalizing for blood glucose level increased the variability and decreased the level of concordance between studies. Conclusion: The SUVs measured in normal liver and mediastinum in cancer-free patients are stable over time, no matter which normalization is used. Correcting for blood glucose level increases the variability of the values and should therefore be avoided. Normalizing for BSA or LBM does not improve the reproducibility of the measurements. [less ▲]

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See detail18F-tyrosine PET in Neurooncology : an alternative to 11C-methionine.
KASCHTEN; LEMAIRE, C.; LUXEN, A. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2004), 45(SUPPL), 264

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See detailTraceurs fluorés de la prolifération des cancers en tomographie par émission de positons
Couturier, Olivier; Bodet-Milin, C.; Cherel, M. et al

in Médecine Nucléaire : Imagerie Fonctionnelle et Métabolique (2004), 28(8), 371-376

Le 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) est actuellement le seul traceur fluoré utilisé en routine en tomographie par émission de positons (TEP). Le fluor 18 peut être considéré comme le radioisotope TEP idéal ... [more ▼]

Le 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) est actuellement le seul traceur fluoré utilisé en routine en tomographie par émission de positons (TEP). Le fluor 18 peut être considéré comme le radioisotope TEP idéal avec : 1) une émission positonique de faible énergie (0,64 MeV), limitant l'irradiation reçue par le patient ainsi que le parcours du positon dans les tissus (2,3 mm), avec comme conséquence directe, une haute résolution des images TEP; 2) une période de 110 minutes permettant une radiosynthèse avec un bon rendement, un transport depuis l'établissement de radiopharmacie vers des services de médecine nucléaire distants, et des protocoles d'imagerie pouvant s'étendre sur quelques heures, ce qui facilite les études dynamiques et de processus métaboliques relativement lents. Récemment, la radiosynthèse fluorée à partir de groupes prothétiques précurseurs, qui permet le marquage de molécules bioactives dans de bonnes conditions, a donné un nouvel élan au développement de nombreux traceurs fluorés. En raison de la disponibilité du fluor, ils pourraient occuper dans un avenir proche une place importante en routine. Cet article et une revue de la littérature concernant les traceurs fluorés récemment développés et/ou en cours d'investigation, susceptibles d'être employés pour évaluer la prolifération tumorale. [less ▲]

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See detailNew strategies and new impact of cancer imaging
Couturier, Olivier; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Chatal, Jean-François

in SERVIER, Jacques (Ed.) Cancer : recent evidence, innovative strategies, future promises (2004)

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See detailPET in lung cancer
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg

in Bailey, D. L.; Townsend, D. W.; Valk, P. E. (Eds.) et al Positron emission tomography. Principles and practice (2004)

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications ... [more ▼]

Positron Emission Tomography - basic science and clinical practice thoroughly explains the principles, clinical applications and economic aspects of PET today. Chapters go into detail on PET applications in oncology, the central nervous system, cardio-respiratory systems, infectious diseases and pediatrics. Discussions are also found on technology design and evaluation, PET in drug discovery and development, and in imaging gene expression and therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailTomographie a emission de positons: une revolution en cancerologie?
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Revue du Praticien (La) (2003), 53(15), 1629-30

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See detailWhole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with metastases of unknown primary tumours (CUP syndrome)
Alberini, J. L.; Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2003), 24(10), 1081-1086

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients with metastases of unknown origin. Forty-one patients, without previous history of known cancer (18 women and 23 men; average age 64.1 years) with metastasis confirmed by histopathological analysis were included in a retrospective study. Results of PET were compared with those of techniques used in the current conventional diagnostic procedure. All known metastatic lesions were detected by PET. There were 26 true-positive and two false-negative results. Primary tumour remained undetermined in eight patients after conventional investigations and PET. PET was superior to conventional diagnostic procedure in 11 patients and led to modify treatment in 11 patients. Sensitivity of PET was superior than computed tomography in detecting abdominal primary tumours. FDG PET is useful in patients with unknown primary tumour because its sensitivity is good and it could modify the disease management. Otherwise, PET allows the evaluation of the extent of the disease and could be used to monitor treatment efficiency. Its contribution has to be evaluated particularly in patients with primary tumour with a specific treatment. ((C) 2003 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

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See detailImaging of large vessel vasculitis with (18)FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data
Belhocine, Tarik; Blockmans, Daniel; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2003), 30(9), 1305-1313

Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients ... [more ▼]

Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of (18)FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the (18)FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging. [less ▲]

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See detailStaging of primary cervical cancers: the role of nuclear medicine
Belhocine, Tarik; Kridelka, Frédéric ULg; Thille, Alain ULg et al

in Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology (2003), 46(3), 275-284

In nuclear medicine, [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) and lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy (LM/SL) may significantly improve the staging of primary ... [more ▼]

In nuclear medicine, [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) and lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy (LM/SL) may significantly improve the staging of primary cervical cancers. Indeed, the disease progresses in a 'level by level' fashion to regional nodes through the lymphatic channels, and also to extra-nodal sites via the hematogenous stream. Additionally, the sub-optimal efficacy of routine radiological protocols, while new combined therapies are proving to be more efficient, stresses the need for alternative staging procedures. Current data suggest that LM/SL accurately reflects the regional lymph node status in early stage cervical cancers, and thus could avoid unnecessary complete lymphadenectomies. Also, whole body (18)FDG PET may provide valuable insights on extra-pelvic and distant tumor spreading, with a significant impact on treatment choices. If these promising results are confirmed on large controlled trials, LM/SL and (18)FDG PET imaging could be incorporated in the routine staging work-up of primary cervical cancers. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailWhole-body tumor imaging using PET and 2-18F-fluoro-l-tyrosine: Preliminary evaluation and comparison with 18F-FDG
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Jerusalem, Guy ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (2003), 44(4), 533-539

18F-FDG PET imaging is now established as a valuable tool for evaluating cancer patients. However, a limitation of 18F-FDG is its absence of specificity for tumor. Both protein synthesis and amino acid ... [more ▼]

18F-FDG PET imaging is now established as a valuable tool for evaluating cancer patients. However, a limitation of 18F-FDG is its absence of specificity for tumor. Both protein synthesis and amino acid transport are enhanced in most tumor cells, but their metabolism is less affected in inflammation. We therefore decided to evaluate the ability of PET with 2-18F-fluoro-L-tyrosine (18F-TYR) to visualize cancer lesions in patients compared with 18F-FDG PET. Methods: 18F-FDG PET and 18F-TYR PET were performed on 23 patients with histologically proven malignancies (11 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), 10 lymphomas, and 2 head and neck carcinomas). Fully corrected, whole-body PET studies were obtained on separate days. 18F-FDG studies were performed after routine clinical fashion. 18F-TYR studies were started 36 ± 6 min after tracer injection and a second scan centered over a reference lesion was acquired after completion of the whole-body survey-on average, 87 min after injection. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated for all abnormal foci and for various normal structures. Results were compared with pathologic or correlative studies. Results: 18F-FDG PET correctly identified 54 malignant lesions, among which 36 were also visualized with 18F-TYR (67%). 18F-TYR did not detect any additional lesion. Tumor SUVs (SUVbw, 5.2 vs. 2.5), tumor-to-muscle (7.4 vs. 2.7), and tumor-to-mediastinum activity ratios (3 vs. 1.4) were higher with 18F-FDG than with 18F-TYR. Two of 11 NSCLCs and 4 of 10 lymphomas were understaged with 18F-TYR compared with 18F-FDG. Although the NSCLC lesions missed by 18F-TYR PET were small, several large lymphoma lesions did not accumulate the tracer. In 4 patients, 18F-TYR-positive lesions coexisted with 18F-TYR-negative lesions. There was a high physiologic 18F-TYR uptake by the pancreas (average SUVbw, 10.3) and the liver (average SUVbw, 6.3). Muscle and bone marrow uptakes were also higher with 18F-TYR than with 18F-FDG: average SUVbw, 1 versus 0.7 and 2.6 versus 1.8, respectively. There was no change over time in the 18F-TYR uptake by the tumors or the normal structures. Conclusion: 18F-TYR PET is not superior to 18F-FDG PET for staging patients with NSCLC and lymphomas. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging gliomas with positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography
Bénard, François; Romsa, Jonathan; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Seminars in Nuclear Medicine (2003), 33(2), 148-162

Over the last two decades the large volume of research involving various brain tracers has shed invaluable light on the pathophysiology of cerebral neoplasms. Yet the question remains as to how best to ... [more ▼]

Over the last two decades the large volume of research involving various brain tracers has shed invaluable light on the pathophysiology of cerebral neoplasms. Yet the question remains as to how best to incorporate this newly acquired insight into the clinical context. Thallium is the most studied radiotracer with the longest track record. Many, but not all studies, show a relationship between Tl-201 uptake and tumor grade. Due to the overlap between tumor uptake and histologic grades, Tl-201 cannot be used as the sole noninvasive diagnostic or prognostic tool in brain tumor patients. However, it may help differentiating a high-grade tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis. MIBI is theoretically a better imaging agent than Tl-201 but it has not convincingly been shown to differentiate tumors according to grade. MDR-1 gene expression as demonstrated by MIBI does not correlate with chemoresistance in high grade gliomas. Currently, MIBI's clinical role in brain tumor imaging has yet to be defined. IMT, a radio-labeled amino acid analog, may be useful for identifying postoperative tumor recurrence and, in this application, appears to be a cheaper, more widely available tool than positron emission tomography (PET). However, its ability to accurately identify tumor grade is limited. 18 F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET predicts tumor grade, and the metabolic activity of brain tumors has a prognostic significance. Whether FDG uptake has an independent prognostic value above that of histology remains debated. FDG-PET is effective in differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis for high-grade tumors, but has limited value in defining the extent of tumor involvement and recurrence of low-grade lesions. Amino-acid tracers, such as MET, perform better for this purpose and thus play a complementary role to FDG. Given the poor prognosis of patients with gliomas, particularly with high-grade lesions, the overall clinical utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET in characterizing recurrent lesions remains dependent on the availability of effective treatments. These tools are thus mostly suited to the evaluation of treatment response in experimental protocols designed to improve the patients' outcome. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIntra-patient variability of SUV in normal tissues.
PAQUET, N.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; FOIDART-WILLEMS, Jacqueline ULg

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2003), 30(SUPPL 2), 327

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See detailValue of 18FDG gamma camera coincidence imaging in the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
PAQUET, N.; LEFEBVRE, B.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2003), 30(SUPPL 2), 278

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See detailAdded value of whole body 18FDG PET imaging in monitoring uterine cancers.
BELHOCINE, T.; THILLE, A.; DE BARSY, C. et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2003), 30(SUPPL 2), 269

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See detailWhole-body FDG PET imaging as a method for staging and early assessment of treatment response in pediatric patients with lymphoma.
DE BARSY; DEPAS, G.; DRESSE, MF. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2003), 44

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See detailWhole-body FDG PET in the follow-up of pediatric patients with lymphoma.
DE BARSY; DEPAS, G.; DRESSE, MF. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2003), 44

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