References of "Grodent, Denis"
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See detailSignatures of magnetospheric injections in Saturn's aurora
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Roussos, E.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2013)

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See detailAuroral counterpart of magnetic field dipolarizations in Saturn’s tail
Jackman, C.M.; Achilleos, N.; Cowley, S.W.H. et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2013)

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See detailBursty magnetic reconnection at Saturn's magnetosphere
Badman, S. V.; Masters, A.; Hasegawa, H. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2013)

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See detailAuroral signatures of multiple magnetopause reconnection at Saturn
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2013)

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See detailUnraveling electron acceleration mechanisms in Ganymede's space environment through N-S conjugate imagery of Jupiter's aurora
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

There is strong scientific interest in Ganymede (Jupiter's third Galilean moon) and its surrounding environment, which stems from the likely presence of a liquid water ocean underneath its icy crust and ... [more ▼]

There is strong scientific interest in Ganymede (Jupiter's third Galilean moon) and its surrounding environment, which stems from the likely presence of a liquid water ocean underneath its icy crust and from its internally driven magnetic field. The interaction of the latter with Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma and its magnetic field gives rise to a unique situation in our solar system implying a mini-magnetosphere embedded within a giant-magnetosphere. This interaction generates Ganymede's ultraviolet auroral footprint in Jupiter's atmosphere. We propose to investigate the strong auroral connection between Jupiter and Ganymede and the variable characteristics of Ganymede's magnetosphere with an innovative approach, taking advantage of the large scale north-south asymmetries of Jupiter's magnetic field. The results obtained for Ganymede will be compared with the case of small injected hot plasma bubbles observed by the Galileo spacecraft and whose size and location are similar to those of Ganymede's magnetosphere. HST is currently the sole instrument capable of obtaining this information which pins down the proposed mechanisms linking the source and sink regions of auroral particles in the giant planets' magnetospheres. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of methane on giant planet’s UV emissions and implications for the auroral characteristics
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy (2013)

This study reviews methods used to determine important characteristics of giant planet’s UV aurora (brightness,energy of the precipitating particles, altitude of the emission peak,. . .), based on the ... [more ▼]

This study reviews methods used to determine important characteristics of giant planet’s UV aurora (brightness,energy of the precipitating particles, altitude of the emission peak,. . .), based on the absorbing properties of methane and other hydrocarbons. Ultraviolet aurorae on giant planets are mostly caused by inelastic collisions between energetic magnetospheric electrons and the ambient atmospheric H2 molecules. The auroral emission is situated close to a hydrocarbon layer and may be attenuated by methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6) and acetylene (C2H2) at selected wavelengths. As methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon, it is the main UV absorber and attenuates the auroral emission shorward of 1350 Å. The level of absorption is used to situate the altitude/pressure level of the aurora, hence the energy of the precipitated electrons, whose penetration depth is directly related to their mean energy. Several techniques are used to determine these characteristics, from the color ratio method which measures the level of absorption from the ratio between an absorbed and an unabsorbed portion of the observed auroral spectrum, to more realistic methods which combine theoretical distributions of the precipitating electrons with altitude dependent atmospheric models. The latter models are coupled with synthetic or laboratory H2 spectra and the simulated emergent spectra are compared to observations to determine the best auroral characteristics. Although auroral characteristics may be very variable with time and locations, several typical properties may be highlighted from these methods: the Jovian aurora is the most powerful, with brightness around 120 kR produced by electrons of mean energy 100 keV and an emission situated near the 1 lbar level ( 250 km above the 1 bar level) while Saturn’s aurora is fainter ( 10 kR), produced by electrons less than 20 keV and situated near the 0.2 lbar level ( 1100 km). [less ▲]

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See detailLikely Detection of UV Auroral Emission from the Magnetic Footprint of Callisto
Clarke, John; Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Montgomery, Jordan et al

Poster (2012, December 06)

A large number of UV images of Jupiter's aurora were obtained in 2007/2008 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS/SBC camera. The initial results on variations with the solar wind conditions have been ... [more ▼]

A large number of UV images of Jupiter's aurora were obtained in 2007/2008 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS/SBC camera. The initial results on variations with the solar wind conditions have been published elsewhere, but the large database permits other studies to be performed. In particular, while auroral emissions have been detected from the magnetic footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede in Jupiter's atmosphere, the footprint of Callisto has been located too close to the main auroral oval to be detected. We have thus analyzed images of the ultraviolet auroral emissions of Jupiter taken using the F115LP filter on the HST/ACS instrument. Using a unique co-addition method, we have identified a strong candidate for the footprint of Callisto on May 24, 2007. We tested this finding by applying the same co-addition method to a nearly identical auroral configuration on May 30, 2007 when Callisto was well removed in its orbit. Comparing the two co-added images, we can clearly see the presence of Callisto’s footprint on the 24th and its absence on the 30th. The method relies as well on the motion of Callisto's footprint remaining under the satellite, while most of the auroral emissions rotate with the planet. The images and analysis method will be presented in this presentation. [less ▲]

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See detailA brief review of auroral emissions of the outer planets
Grodent, Denis ULg

Conference (2012, November 26)

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See detailOn the origin of Saturn's polar auroral arcs
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2012, September 27)

Saturn’s main auroral emission similarly to Earth’s is suggested to be associated with the open-closed field line boundary. The polar auroral emissions at Saturn, emissions located poleward of the main ... [more ▼]

Saturn’s main auroral emission similarly to Earth’s is suggested to be associated with the open-closed field line boundary. The polar auroral emissions at Saturn, emissions located poleward of the main emission consist of several arc-like and spotty features. In this study we focus on the arc-like structures observed with the UVIS instrument onboard Cassini and we characterize them into three groups: ‘bending arcs’ arcs whose one end is connected to the main emision, ‘oval aligned arcs’ arcs oriented parallel to the main emission and ‘moving arcs’ arcs which move with time inside the main emission. We study their occurrence rate, location, size as well as their associated expansion or contraction of the main emission. Finally, we compare the auroral arcs at Saturn with those in the terrestrial aurora and we examine their relation to a combination of solar wind parameters such as northward IMF, strong IMF magnitude and high solar wind speed. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolating the 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions in Ganymede’s aurora using broadband optics
Molyneux, Philippa M; Grodent, Denis ULg; Bunce, Emma J et al

Conference (2012, September 27)

We discuss a technique for isolating the two main Far Ultraviolet emission lines in Ganymede’s aurora by adding flight proven transmission filters to a broad- band, wide-field imager design. We find that ... [more ▼]

We discuss a technique for isolating the two main Far Ultraviolet emission lines in Ganymede’s aurora by adding flight proven transmission filters to a broad- band, wide-field imager design. We find that the ra- tio of OI emissions at 135.6 nm and 130.4 nm can be recovered if the transmission of the filters and other optical elements are well known. This ratio allows constraints to be placed on the relative abundances of O atoms and O2 molecules within Ganymede’s at- mosphere, leading to more accurate models of atmo- spheric composition. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral counterpart of magnet ic dipolarizations in Saturn’s tail
Jackman, Caitriona; Achilleos, Nicholas; Cowley, Stan et al

Poster (2012, September 27)

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations ... [more ▼]

Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming “dipolarized” in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations are initially identified in magnetometer data by looking for a southward turning of the magnetic field, indicating the transition from a radially stretched configuration to a more dipolar field topology. The highly stretched geometry of the kronian magnetotail lobes gives rise to a tail current which flows eastward (dusk to dawn) in the near equatorial plane across the centre of the tail. During reconnection and associated dipolarization of the field, the inner edge of this tail current can be diverted through the ionosphere, in a situation analogous to the substorm current wedge picture at Earth. We present a picture of the current circuit arising from this tail reconfiguration, and outline the equations which govern the field- current relationship. We show the first in situ example of a dipolarization identified in the Cassini magnetometer data and use this formalism to estimate the ionospheric current density that would arise for this example and the implications for auroral electron acceleration in regions of upward directed field-aligned current. We then present a separate example of data from the Cassini UVIS instrument where we observe small ‘spots’ of auroral emission lying near the main oval; features suggested to be associated with dipolarizations in the tail. In the example shown, such auroral features are the precursor to more intense activity associated with recurrent energisation via particle injections from the tail following reconnection. [less ▲]

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See detailConversion from HST ACS and STIS auroral counts into brightness, precipitated power, and radiated power for H2 giant planets
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2012), 117

The STIS and ACS instruments onboard HST are widely used to study the giant planet's aurora. Several assumptions have to be made to convert the instrumental counts into meaningful physical values (type ... [more ▼]

The STIS and ACS instruments onboard HST are widely used to study the giant planet's aurora. Several assumptions have to be made to convert the instrumental counts into meaningful physical values (type and bandwidth of the filters, definition of the physical units, etc…), but these may significantly differ from one author to another, which makes it difficult to compare the auroral characteristics published in different studies. We present a method to convert the counts obtained in representative ACS and STIS imaging modes/filters used by the auroral scientific community to brightness, precipitated power and radiated power in the ultraviolet (700-1800 Å). Since hydrocarbon absorption may considerably affect the observed auroral emission, the conversion factors are determined for several attenuation levels. Several properties of the auroral emission have been determined: the fraction of the H[SUB]2[/SUB] emission shortward and longward of the HLy-α line is 50.3% and 49.7% respectively, the contribution of HLy-α to the total unabsorbed auroral signal has been set to 9.1% and an input of 1 mW m[SUP]-2[/SUP] produces 10 kR of H[SUB]2[/SUB] in the Lyman and Werner bands. A first application sets the order of magnitude of Saturn's auroral characteristics in the total UV bandwidth to a brightness of 10 kR and an emitted power of ˜2.8 GW. A second application uses published brightnesses of Europa's footprint to determine the current density associated with the Europa auroral spot: 0.21 and 0.045 μA m[SUP]-2[/SUP] assuming no hydrocarbon absorption and a color ratio of 2, respectively. Factors to extend the brightnesses observed with Cassini-UVIS to total H[SUB]2[/SUB] UV brightnesses are also provided. [less ▲]

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See detailObservations of equatorward patchy auroral ultraviolet emissions
Dumont, Maïté ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg et al

Conference (2012, May 25)

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See detailSaturn's temperature profiles at high, medium and low latitudes derived from UVIS occultations
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Moses, Julie; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2012, May 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (10 ULg)