References of "Grodent, Denis"
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See detailJUDE: A Far-UV Imager for JUICE
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bunce, Emma; Bannister, Nigel et al

Poster (2011, August 31)

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See detailUV-IR comparison: Jupiter aurora
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg

Conference (2011, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
See detailThe Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
Gladstone, G. R.; Persyn, S.; Eterno, J. et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (5 ULg)
See detailCassini UVIS Observations of Varying Auroral Emissions on Saturn's Night Side
Pryor, W.; Esposito, L.; Jouchoux, A. et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
See detailAuroral signatures of injections in the magnetosphere of Saturn
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Roussos, E.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (12 ULg)
See detailMapping Jupiter's auroral features to magnetospheric sources: Comparing results from three different models for Jupiter's ionospheric magnetic field
Vogt, M. F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K. et al

Conference (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
See detailInside the Jupiter Main Auroral Emissions: Flares, Spots, Arc...and Satellite Footprints?
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Vogt, M. F.; Yoneda, M. et al

Conference (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (11 ULg)
See detailThe multiple spots of the Ganymede footprint
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Hess, S.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (7 ULg)
See detailModel of the Jovian magnetic field topology constrained by the Io auroral emissions
Hess, S.; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
See detailAuroral emissions of Europa
Grodent, Denis ULg

Conference (2011, June 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
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See detailImproved mapping of Jupiter’s auroral features to magnetospheric sources
Vogt, Marissa. F.; Kivelson, Margaret. G.; Khurana, Krishan. K. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

The magnetospheric mapping of Jupiter's polar auroral emissions is highly uncertain because global Jovian field models are known to be inaccurate beyond ∼30 RJ. Furthermore, the boundary between open and ... [more ▼]

The magnetospheric mapping of Jupiter's polar auroral emissions is highly uncertain because global Jovian field models are known to be inaccurate beyond ∼30 RJ. Furthermore, the boundary between open and closed flux in the ionosphere is not well defined because, unlike the Earth, the main auroral oval emissions at Jupiter are likely associated with the breakdown of plasma corotation and not the open/closed flux boundary in the polar cap. We have mapped contours of constant radial distance from the magnetic equator to the ionosphere in order to understand how auroral features relate to magnetospheric sources. Instead of following model field lines, we map equatorial regions to the ionosphere by requiring that the magnetic flux in some specified region at the equator equals the magnetic flux in the area to which it maps in the ionosphere. Equating the fluxes in this way allows us to link a given position in the magnetosphere to a position in the ionosphere. We find that the polar auroral active region maps to field lines beyond the dayside magnetopause that can be interpreted as Jupiter's polar cusp; the swirl region maps to lobe field lines on the night side and can be interpreted as Jupiter's polar cap; the dark region spans both open and closed field lines and must be explained by multiple processes. Additionally, we conclude that the flux through most of the area inside the main oval matches the magnetic flux contained in the magnetotail lobes and is probably open to the solar wind. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter's Aurora as Imaged by the NASA IRTF and Comparison with Hubble Space Telescope Observations in the UV
Lystrup, M.; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg et al

Conference (2011, March)

We investigate Jupiter's infrared aurora using observations from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility from 1995-2000 as compared with observations in the UV from the Hubble Space Telescope.

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See detailLes aurores de Jupiter et Saturne : la crise énergétique des planètes géantes
Grodent, Denis ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2011)

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See detailHubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys Observations of Europa's Atmospheric Ultraviolet Emission at Eastern Elongation
Saur, Joachim; Feldman, Paul D; Roth, Lorenz et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2011), 738

We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e., Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five ... [more ▼]

We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e., Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric O I 1304 Å and O I 1356 Å emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 ± 14 and 226 ± 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the same order as the statistical errors may be due to uncertainties in modeling the reflected light from Europa's surface. The total emission also shows a clear dependence of Europa's position with respect to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma sheet. We derive a lower limit for the O[SUB]2[/SUB] column density of 6 × 10[SUP]18[/SUP] m[SUP]-2[/SUP]. Previous observations of Europa's atmosphere with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in 1999 of Europa's trailing side show an enigmatic surplus of radiation on the anti-Jovian side within the disk of Europa. With emission from a radially symmetric atmosphere as a reference, we searched for an anti-Jovian versus sub-Jovian asymmetry with respect to the central meridian on the leading side and found none. Likewise, we searched for departures from a radially symmetric atmospheric emission and found an emission surplus centered around 90° west longitude, for which plausible mechanisms exist. Previous work about the possibility of plumes on Europa due to tidally driven shear heating found longitudes with strongest local strain rates which might be consistent with the longitudes of maximum UV emissions. Alternatively, asymmetries in Europa's UV emission can also be caused by inhomogeneous surface properties, an optically thick atmospheric contribution of atomic oxygen, and/or by Europa's complex plasma interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailPeriodic bursts of non-Io DAM and its relationship to Jovian aurora phenomena
Rucker, H.; Panchenko, M.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailSmall-scale structures in Saturn's ultraviolet aurora
Grodent, Denis ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

On 26 August 2008, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph Subsystem (UVIS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft recorded a series of spatially resolved spectra of the northern auroral region of Saturn ... [more ▼]

On 26 August 2008, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph Subsystem (UVIS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft recorded a series of spatially resolved spectra of the northern auroral region of Saturn. Near periapsis, the spacecraft was only five Saturn radii (R[SUB]S[/SUB]) from the surface and spatially resolved auroral structures as small as 500 km across (0.5° of latitude). We report the observation of two types of UV auroral substructures at the location of the main ring of emission, bunches of spots and narrow arcs. They are found in the noon and dusk sectors, respectively, at latitudes ranging from 73 to 80° corresponding to equatorial regions located beyond 16 R[SUB]S[/SUB]. Their brightness ranges from 1 to 30 kR and their characteristic size varies from 500 km to several thousands of km. These small-scale substructures are likely associated with patterns of upward field aligned currents resulting from nonuniform plasma flow in the equatorial plane. It is suggested that magnetopause Kelvin-Helmholtz waves trigger localized perturbations in the flow, like vortices, able to give rise to the observed UV auroral substructures. [less ▲]

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See detailBifurcations of the main auroral ring at Saturn: ionospheric signatures of consecutive reconnection events at the magnetopause
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

This work reports for the first time on bifurcations of the main auroral ring at Saturn observed with the UVIS instrument onboard Cassini. The observation sequence starts with an intensification on the ... [more ▼]

This work reports for the first time on bifurcations of the main auroral ring at Saturn observed with the UVIS instrument onboard Cassini. The observation sequence starts with an intensification on the main oval, close to noon, which is possibly associated with dayside reconnection. Consecutive bifurcations appear with the onset of dayside reconnection, between 11 and 18 magnetic local time, while the area poleward of the main emission expands to lower latitudes. The bifurcations depart with time from the main ring of emission, which is related to the open-closed field line boundary. The augmentation of the area poleward of the main emission following its expansion is balanced by the area occupied by the bifurcations, suggesting that these auroral features represent the amount of newly open flux and could be related to consecutive reconnection events at the flank of the magnetopause. The observations show that the open flux along the sequence increases when bifurcations appear. Magnetopause reconnection can lead to significant augmentation of the open flux within a couple of days and each reconnection event opens ∼10% of the flux contained within the polar cap. Additionally, the observations imply an overall length of the reconnection line of ∼4 hours of local time and suggest that dayside reconnection at Saturn can occur at several positions on the magnetopause consecutively or simultaneously. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 ULg)