References of "Gabriel, Annick"
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See detailNeuroimmune connections in jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches at various bovine ages: potential sites for prion neuroinvasion
Defaweux, Valérie ULg; Dorban, Gauthier ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg et al

in Cell & Tissue Research (2007), 329(1), 35-44

During preclinical stages of cattle orally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the responsible agent is confined to ileal Peyer's patches (IPP), namely in nerve fibers and in lymph ... [more ▼]

During preclinical stages of cattle orally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the responsible agent is confined to ileal Peyer's patches (IPP), namely in nerve fibers and in lymph follicles, before reaching the peripheral and central nervous systems. No infectivity has been reported in other bovine lymphoid organs, including jejunal Peyer's patches (JPP). To determine the potential sites for prion neuroinvasion in IPP, we analyzed the mucosal innervation and the interface between nerve fibers and follicular dendritic cells (FDC), two dramatic influences on neuroinvasion. Bovine IPP were studied at three ages, viz., newborn calves, calves less than 12 months old, and bovines older than 24 months, and the parameters obtained were compared with those of JPP. No differences in innervation patterns between IPP and JPP were found. The major difference observed was that, in calves of less than 12 months, IPP were the major mucosal-associated lymphoid organ that possessed a large number of follicles with extended FDC networks. Using a panel of antibodies, we showed that PP in 24-month-old bovines were highly innervated at various strategic sites assumed to be involved in the invasion and replication of the BSE pathogen: the suprafollicular dome, T cell area, and germinal centers. In PP in calves of less than 12 months old, no nerve fibers positive for the neurofilament markers NF-L (70 kDa) and NF-H (200 kDa) were observed in contact with FDC. Thus, in view of the proportion of these protein subunits present in neurofilaments, the innervation of the germinal centers can be said to be an age-dependent dynamic process. This variation in innervation might influence the path of neuroinvasion and, thus, the susceptibility of bovines to the BSE agent. [less ▲]

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See detailUltrasonography and histology of equine menisci; a comparative study of the medial
De Busscher,V; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

Poster (2007, January)

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See detailDie Notfalltracheotomie beim Pferd
Carstanjen, B.; Gabriel, Annick ULg

in Praktische Tierarzt (Der) (2007)

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See detailMorphology of the stifle menisci in dogs: preliminary study
De Busscher, Virginie; Letesson, Julien; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

in Slovenian Veterinary Research (2007), 44

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See detailEvaluation of serum osteocalcin and CTX-I in Ardenner horses with special reference to juvenile interphalangeal joint disease.
Pastoret, V.; Carstanjen, B.; Lejeune, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Medicine. A, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Medicine (2007), 54(9), 458-63

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses ... [more ▼]

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses were collected. The second aim was to study two biochemical markers of bone metabolism, OC and a carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), in 30 young Ardenner horses during 1 year. Amongst them, 17 showed lesions of juvenile degenerative joint disease in the distal forelimbs. A specific radioimmunoassay for equine OC was used to measure the serum concentration of the marker. The serum concentration of CTX-I was measured using a commercially available human assay validated for use in the horse. The effect of age, sex, season and health status (with or without lesions) was assessed. Levels of OC fall between birth and the adult stage: this decrease being most marked between birth and 1 year of age. This age-related decrease of OC was confirmed in the 30 young Ardenner horses, but CTX-I levels remained constant in this group. The Levels of the two markers changed significantly with the season with higher concentrations during the winter. No significant difference was shown either between the two sexes or between the two health statuses. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative ultrasonographic and morphologic appearance of femorotibial menisci in horses: a preliminary study
De Busscher, V.; Busoni, Valeria ULg; Schreder, A. et al

in Canifelis Hippos Proceedings (2007)

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See detailDistribution of nerve fibres in bovine and human mucosal associated lymphoid tissues
Defaweux, Valérie ULg; Dorban, G.; Antoine, Nadine ULg et al

Poster (2006, October)

Prion cell tropism varies significantly among animal species, depending on both the agent strain and host-specific factors. For example, prions show high lymphotropism in scrapie infected sheep and vCJD ... [more ▼]

Prion cell tropism varies significantly among animal species, depending on both the agent strain and host-specific factors. For example, prions show high lymphotropism in scrapie infected sheep and vCJD, but little, if any, in sCJD or BSE. In particular, the BSE strain is associated with significant PrP-res accumulation in tonsils, spleen and appendix in humans, whereas it is largely confined to the nervous system in infected cattle. Therefore, at least in the case of BSE and vCJD, it appears that host properties can influence the accumulation of the infectious agent in lymphoid organs. Mature FDC play an important role in prion pathogenesis, since neuroinvasion following peripheral challenge is significantly impaired in their absence. The proximity between these FDC and sympathetic nerve endings is known to affect the speed of prion neuroinvasion. In this study, we analysed the mucosal innervation and the interface between nerve fibres and FDC in bovine and human tonsils and in ileal and jejunal bovine Peyer’s patches using a panel of antibodies observed by confocal microscopy. Since differences in the innervation of lymphoid organs depending on age have been reported, we analysed three categories of bovine ages (new born calves, calves less than 12 months old and bovines older than 24 months) and two categories of human ages (patients less than 5 years old and patients older than 25 years). In both species, hypothetical ways of innervation by-passing germinal centre could be postulated: nerve fibres are widely distributed in antigens/cells traffic area (the lamina propria, the interfollicular zone, the suprafollicular dome in Peyer’s patches and the lymphoepithelial area in tonsils). We pointed out that, only in ileal and jejunal Peyer’s patches and in tonsils of bovines older than 24 months, nerve fibres are observed to be in contact with FDC. In contrast, in human tonsils, no nerve fibres established contact with FDC, whatever the age. Thus, innervation of germinal centres can be said to be an age-dependent dynamic process in bovines and a weak innervation of the secondary lymphoid organs could thus be a rate-limiting step to neuroinvasion in humans. This variation could influence the way of neuroinvasion and thus, the differences of susceptibility of bovines and humans to the BSE agent. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of a bone biopsy technique for tiludronic acid dosage in horses: a preliminary study
Delguste, Catherine ULg; Doucet, Michèle; Gabriel, Annick ULg et al

Poster (2006, September)

Introduction Tiludronic acid as a bisphosphonate has a strong affinity for bone, making difficult the assessment of its PK profile in this deep compartment on living animals. The invasive nature of sample ... [more ▼]

Introduction Tiludronic acid as a bisphosphonate has a strong affinity for bone, making difficult the assessment of its PK profile in this deep compartment on living animals. The invasive nature of sample collection remains a limiting factor. This study was carried out in order to assess a bone biopsy technique allowing the repetition of sampling over a long period of time to dose tiludronic acid in equine bone. Material and Methods Six healthy 4- to 8-year-old Standardbred geldings were treated with tiludronic acid 1 mg/kg in a saline infusion over 30 minutes. The horses were subjected to euthanasia on days 1, 43, 57, 92, 182 and 222 post-treatment, respectively. Bone samples (test samples and larger reference samples) were taken at 4 sites per side and per horse: the lateral aspect of the metacarpal bone III (MCIII) of the forelimb, the 13th rib, the tuber coxae and the cuboïd bone. Test samples were taken with a 5-mm diameter dental drill (Implanteo™, Anthogyr), while larger reference samples were taken around the drill sample sites with an osteotome. All samples were taken immediately after euthanasia. Tiludronic acid concentrations were measured by HPLC with UV detection. Results The tuber coxae was the easiest site to sample. The sample site of the MCIII was easily accessible but due to the extreme hardness of the bone, the drill sampling was technically difficult to perform. Drill samples obtained from the 13th rib were very small, and the access more limited. Finally, the access to the cuboïd bone required considerable dissection, not performable in vivo. Extraction and dosage of tiludronic acid from the MCIII was difficult for technical reasons in most cases, in drill samples as well as in reference samples, and most (96%) of the values obtained were considered unreliable. This was also true for some samples from the 13th rib and from the cuboïd bone, to a lesser extent (42% of unreliable values for both sites). Moreover, for these two sample sites, less technical problems were encountered for the extraction and dosage of tiludronic acid in drill samples than in reference samples. No extraction or dosage problem was encountered with the tuber coxae samples. The ratio of tiludronic acid concentrations in drill versus reference samples ranged from 73% to 185% (mean: 124%), 65% to 208% (mean: 118%), and 26% to 110% (mean: 62%) respectively in the tuber coxae, 13th rib and cuboïd bone. In all but one horse, the highest concentrations in tiludronic acid were found in the tuber coxae, while the lowest values tended to be in the cuboïd bone at any time post-treatment. Tiludronic acid was still found in all bone samples 7 months after treatment. Discussion As previously reported with other tools, the drill tested in this study should permit to conveniently perform bone biopsies in the equine tuber coxae. This biopsy site would be the most appropriate for repeated sampling to dose tiludronic acid over time. This would help to design appropriate PK/PD studies with tiludronic acid in horses. This study also further confirms the long persistence of tiludronic acid in equine bone. [less ▲]

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See detailBiochemical markers of bone metabolism in Ardennes horses
Pastoret, V.; Carstanjen, V.; Hoyle, N. R. et al

Poster (2006, January)

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See detailMorphometric study of the equine fetlock and coffin joints
Riccio, Barbara; Carstanjen, Bianca; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology (2006), 111

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See detailQuantitative ultrasonography for the noninvasive assessment of equine bone: a review
Carstanjen, B.; Gabriel, Annick ULg

in IPPOLOGIA (2006), 17(4), 11-15

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See detailHistological study of the horse stifle menisci in relation with ultrasonographic aspect: preliminary study
De Busscher, Virginie; Schreder, Anelaure; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

in Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology (2006), 111

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See detailHistological study of equine interphalangeal joints
Toppets, Vinciane ULg; Pastoret, V.; Antoine, Nadine ULg et al

Poster (2005, July)

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See detailEvaluation of plasma carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen concentration in horses.
Carstanjen, Bianca; Hoyle, Nicholas R; Gabriel, Annick ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2004), 65(1), 104-9

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a human assay for quantification of carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), assess the influence of age on plasma CTX-I concentration, investigate the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a human assay for quantification of carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), assess the influence of age on plasma CTX-I concentration, investigate the relationship between plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations, and determine whether concentrations of plasma CTX-I or serum osteocalcin fluctuate in circadian manner in horses. HORSES: 75 clinically normal horses. PROCEDURE: Cross-reactivity between equine serum CTX-I and CTX-I antibodies in an automated electrochemiluminescent sandwich antibody assay (ECLIA) was evaluated via a specificity test (ie, dilution test) and recovery calculation. Serum osteocalcin concentration was measured with an equine-specific osteocalcin radioimmunoassay. To analyze diurnal variations in plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations, blood samples were obtained hourly during a 24-hour period. RESULTS: Results of the dilution test indicated good correlation (r > 0.99) between expected serum CTX-I concentrations and measured serum CTX-I concentrations. The calculated CTX-I recovery was 97.6% to 109.9%. Plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations were correlated. Plasma CTX-I concentration was inversely correlated with age of the horse. No significant circadian variations in plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations were detected. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggest that the fully automated CTX-I ECLIA can be used for evaluation of plasma and serum samples from horses and may be a useful tool to monitor bone metabolism changes. Horses in this study did not have notable diurnal fluctuations in serum osteocalcin and plasma CTX-I concentrations. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphology, growth and modelling of bone tissue
Toppets, Vinciane ULg; Pastoret, V.; De Behr, V. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2004), 148(1), 1-13

Bone is an essential part of the squeletton. Besides its mechanic properties, bone has an important role in metabolism regulation because it acts as a reservoir for the storage of minerals essential to ... [more ▼]

Bone is an essential part of the squeletton. Besides its mechanic properties, bone has an important role in metabolism regulation because it acts as a reservoir for the storage of minerals essential to provide homeostasy. This article describes bone morphology and different ways of classification of this tissue. It gives the composition of organic and mineral extracellular bone matrix, underlines the dynamic character of bone tissue, details the cellular morphology and the metabolism of the elements acting on the synthesis/resorption mechanisms : osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts, osteocyts and osteoclasts. It relates the histogenesis of bone tissue and develops the different types of ossification: intramembranous, periostic, endochondral and osteonal remodeling. The last part of this article describe some dietetary and hormonal influences on bone tissue. [less ▲]

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