References of "Gérard, Jean-Claude"
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See detailObservations of substorm auroras from the IMAGE spacecraft
Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Lampton, M. et al

Conference (2000, October)

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See detailFar ultraviolet imaging of the aurora: new directions
Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M. et al

Conference (2000, October)

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See detailA model of the Lyman-alpha line profile in the proton aurora
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Hubert, Benoît ULg; Bisikalo, Dimitry V et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2000), 105

The Lyman-alpha auroral emission is characterized by a broad line profile whose shape depends on the energy and pitch angle distributions of the initial proton beam, whereas its total brightness reflects ... [more ▼]

The Lyman-alpha auroral emission is characterized by a broad line profile whose shape depends on the energy and pitch angle distributions of the initial proton beam, whereas its total brightness reflects the proton energy flux precipitated into the auroral upper atmosphere. Global remote sensing of the proton aurora through its ultraviolet signature makes it is increasingly important to relate the characteristics of the Lyman-alpha emission to the physical properties of the precipitated proton flux. We present a numerical model of proton and hydrogen flux transport and kinetics based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. In this approach, all elastic and inelastic processes are stochastically simulated as well as is the production of Lyman-alpha photons with the associated Doppler velocity component. The model also includes collisional, geomagnetic, and geometric spreading of the proton-hydrogen beam. We show that consideration of the stochastic character of the H atom velocity redistribution after collisions produces line profiles different from those obtained in the strictly forward or mean scattering angle approximations previously used in proton transport codes. In particular, the predicted fraction of photons due to backscattered particles is considerably larger when stochastic collision scattering is considered than in the strictly forward or mean scattering angle approximations. In contrast to the median wavelength, the position of the peak in the line profile shows a weak inverse dependence on the proton energy. The efficiency of the Lyman-alpha photon production per unit incident energy flux significantly drops as the mean proton energy increases. The line profile and the amount of blue-shifted (for downward viewing) emission depends in a complex way on the initial energy and pitch angle distribution of the protons. The line profiles expected for the noon cusp and midnight proton aurora are shown to be significantly different. [less ▲]

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See detailFar ultraviolet imaging from the IMAGE spacecraft. 1. System design
Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2000), 91

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora, the footprint of magnetospheric regions. To assure the simultaneity of these ... [more ▼]

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora, the footprint of magnetospheric regions. To assure the simultaneity of these observations and the measurement of the magnetospheric background neutral gas density, the IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. In the wavelength region 120-190 nm, a downward-viewing auroral imager is only minimally contaminated by sunlight, scattered from clouds and ground, and radiance of the aurora observed in a nadir viewing geometry can be observed in the presence of the high-latitude dayglow. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N_2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a monochromatic imager, will image different types of aurora, filtered by wavelength. By measuring the Doppler-shifted Ly-alpha, the proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission, which is a measure of the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. Detailed descriptions of the WIC, SI, GEO, and their individual performance validations are discussed in companion papers. This paper summarizes the system requirements and system design approach taken to satisfy the science requirements. One primary requirement is to maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures. The FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, multiple images are taken and electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distortion-corrected in real time for both WIC and SI prior to co-adding. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationery platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers as described in the companion papers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to estimate their on-orbit performance. The predicted instrument system performance is summarized and some of the preliminary data formats are shown. [less ▲]

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See detailFar ultraviolet imaging from the IMAGE spacecraft. 3. Spectral imaging of Lyman-alpha and OI 135.6 nm
Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2000), 91

Two FUV Spectral imaging instruments, the Spectrographic Imager (SI) and the Geocorona Photometer (GEO) provide IMAGE with simultaneous global maps of the hydrogen (121.8 nm) and oxygen 135.6 nm ... [more ▼]

Two FUV Spectral imaging instruments, the Spectrographic Imager (SI) and the Geocorona Photometer (GEO) provide IMAGE with simultaneous global maps of the hydrogen (121.8 nm) and oxygen 135.6 nm components of the terrestrial aurora and with observations of the three dimensional distribution of neutral hydrogen in the magnetosphere (121.6 nm). The SI is a novel instrument type, in which spectral separation and imaging functions are independent of each other. In this instrument, two-dimensional images are produced on two detectors, and the images are spectrally filtered by a spectrograph part of the instrument. One of the two detectors images the Doppler-shifted Lyman-alpha while rejecting the geocoronal `cold' Ly-alpha, and another detector images the OI 135.6 nm emission. The spectrograph is an all-reflective Wadsworth configuration in which a grill arrangement is used to block most of the cold, un-Doppler-shifted geocoronal emission at 121.567 nm. The SI calibration established that the upper limit of transmission at cold geocoronal Ly-alpha is less than 2%. The measured light collecting efficiency was 0.01 and 0.008 cm^2 at 121.8 and at 135.6 nm, respectively. This is consistent with the size of the input aperture, the optical transmission, and the photocathode efficiency. The expected sensitivity is 1.8x10^-2 and 1.3x10^-2 counts per Rayleigh per pixel for each 5 s viewing exposure per satellite revolution (120 s). The measured spatial resolution is better than the 128x128 pixel matrix over the 15 degx15 deg field of view in both wavelength channels. The SI detectors are photon counting devices using the cross delay line principle. In each detector a triple stack microchannel plate (MCP) amplifies the photo-electronic charge which is then deposited on a specially configured anode array. The position of the photon event is measured by digitizing the time delay between the pulses detected at each end of the anode structures. This scheme is intrinsically faster than systems that use charge division and it has a further advantage that it saturates more gradually at high count rates. The geocoronal Ly-alpha is measured by a three-channel photometer system (GEO) which is a separate instrument. Each photometer has a built in MgF_2 lens to restrict the field of view to one degree and a ceramic electron multiplier with a KBr photocathode. One of the tubes is pointing radially outward perpendicular to the axis of satellite rotation. The optic of the other two subtend 60 deg with the rotation axis. These instruments take data continuously at 3 samples per second and rely on the combination of satellite rotation and orbital motion to scan the hydrogen cloud surrounding the earth. The detective efficiencies (effective quantum efficiency including windows) of the three tubes at Ly-alpha are between 6 and 10%. [less ▲]

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See detailMultispectral observations of Jupiter's Aurora
Waite, J. H.; Grodent, Denis ULg; Mauk, B. M. et al

in Advances in Space Research (2000), 26(10), 1453-1475

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on the upper atmosphere ... [more ▼]

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, As indicated by the combination of x-ray and ultraviolet observations, both energetic heavy ions and electrons energized in the outer magnetosphere contribute to auroral excitation. Imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope in the ultraviolet and with the InfraRed Telescope Facility at infrared wavelengths shows several distinct regions of interaction: 1) a dusk sector where turbulent auroral patterns extend well into the polar cap; 2) a morning sector generally characterized by a single spatially confined auroral are originating in the outer or middle magnetosphere of Jupiter; 3) diffuse emissions associated with the Io plasma - spectroscopy has provided important information about the thermal structure of Jupiter's auroral atmosphere and the altitude distribution of auroral particle energy deposition, while Lyman alpha line profiles yield clues to the nature of thermospheric dynamical effects. Galileo observations at visible wavelengths on the nightside offer a new view of the jovian aurora with unprecedented spatial information. Infrared observations have added much to the understanding of thermal structure at all latitudes, the dynamics of the thermospheric wind system, and auroral morphology, and may hold the key to understanding the role of Joule heating in Jupiter's thermosphere. ROSAT observations have revealed soft x-ray emissions from Jupiter's lower latitudes as well as from the auroral zones, implying that energetic particle precipitation also occurs at low latitudes in regions magnetically linked to the inner radiation belts. In this review, multispectral observations of jovian auroral emissions are presented within a theoretical/modeling framework that is intended to provide some insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and its effects on the upper atmosphere. (C) 2000 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnostics of the jovian aurora deduced from ultraviolet spectroscopy: Model and HST/GHRS observations
Dols, V.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Clarke, J. T. et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2000), 147(1), 251-266

A model coupling an electron energy degradation code with a detailed synthetic spectrum of the H-2 Lyman and Werner band system is used to calculate the emerging auroral ultraviolet spectra from Jupiter's ... [more ▼]

A model coupling an electron energy degradation code with a detailed synthetic spectrum of the H-2 Lyman and Werner band system is used to calculate the emerging auroral ultraviolet spectra from Jupiter's atmosphere excited by electrons with different initial energy distributions. The atmospheric model is adapted from the vertical P-T profile measured by the Galileo probe and midlatitude model hydrocarbon photochemistry. Each altitude layer, with its own gas temperature, contributes to the emergent ultraviolet spectrum and the absorbers are vertically distributed within the source region of the auroral emissions. Examples of the calculated spectra are shown to validate the synthetic spectrum and to illustrate the importance of the electron energy distribution and the vertical structure. The model is then applied to the analysis of seven HST/GHRS spectra of the 1200-1700 Angstrom region obtained with 5-Angstrom resolution at various locations in the north and south Jovian aurora. These spectra have different color ratios which characterize the energy of the precipitated electrons, although they do not have a high enough spectral resolution to permit a determination of the H-2 temperature. We find that the characteristic energy of the assumed initial Maxwellian distribution ranges between 17 and 40 keV. A clear signature of acetylene absorption is observed near 1520, 1480, and 1440 Angstrom where the C2H2 cross section shows strong absorption peaks. The acetylene column abundance overlying the emission peak varies from 0.02 to 0.2 of the methane column. A better fit is obtained for some spectra when ethane absorption is added. The C2H6 column abundance varies from 0 to 0.5 of the methane column. These changes relative to methane are presumably the result of perturbations by heat released by the fast electron thermalization and/or perturbations to the hydrocarbon chemistry resulting from the production of H atoms by the aurora, A spectrum of the Io flux tube footprint and its trailing tail shows an ultraviolet color and hydrocarbon absorption quite similar to some of the main oval spectra, This observation suggests that the electrons of the Io flux tube are energized to a few tens of keV, similar to the electron precipitated in the main ovals and polar caps. Echelle spectra between 1216 and 1220 Angstrom at 0.07 Angstrom resolution are also compared with the model fitting best the mid-resolution spectra. It is found that the effective H-2 rovibrational temperature associated with the echelle spectra are significantly higher than predicted by the mid-latitude model. A large vertical temperature gradient just above the methane homopause due to large heating by auroral precipitation is a plausible explanation for this difference. (C) 2000 Academic Press. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of crops on biomass and soil carbon: steady state simulations
Nemry, B.; François, Louis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Cramer, W.; Doherty, R.; Hulme, M. (Eds.) et al Climate Scenarios for Agricultural, Forest and Ecosystem Impacts (2000)

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See detailEvolution de l'environnement planétaire : réchauffement climatique et conséquences
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

Scientific conference (1999, November 17)

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See detailJovian thermal structure inferred from the energy degradation of auroral electrons
Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Waite, J. H.

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1999, October 10)

A one--dimensional model has been developed to investigate the links between auroral heat input and the atmospheric temperature and composition structure of Jupiter. Different energy distributions are ... [more ▼]

A one--dimensional model has been developed to investigate the links between auroral heat input and the atmospheric temperature and composition structure of Jupiter. Different energy distributions are used to evaluate the importance of the energy spectrum of the incident electrons for the thermal balance of Jupiter's auroral thermosphere. Radiative cooling by H_3(+) and hydrocarbon (CH_4, C_2H_2) and downward conduction are calculated to solve the heat conduction equation. The values of observable quantities such as the altitude of the H_2 emission peak, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions and temperatures associated with H_2 and H_3(+) optical signatures are used to constrain the parameters of the auroral electron energy distributions. From these simulations, it appears that the precipitated auroral energy is not able to directly provide the necessary heat to balance the hydrocarbon cooling below the homopause. It is suggested however that the auroral upper stratosphere is warmer than the equatorial upper stratosphere measured by Galileo. A Maxwellian energy distribution with a total flux of 20 ergs cm(-2) s(-1) and a characteristic energy of 22 keV added to a soft Maxwellian component of 1 erg cm(-2) s(-1) and 350 eV produces results in good agreement with thermospheric observations. [less ▲]

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See detailFar ultraviolet Observations of Jovian low latitude regions with HST/STIS
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1999, September 01), 30(11),

Far ultraviolet observations of the Jovian disk were made at low and mid-latitudes with FUV MAMA/STIS on board HST in January 1999 both in the imaging and spectroscopic modes. An image was obtained with ... [more ▼]

Far ultraviolet observations of the Jovian disk were made at low and mid-latitudes with FUV MAMA/STIS on board HST in January 1999 both in the imaging and spectroscopic modes. An image was obtained with the Lyalpha filter in the hydrogen bulge region for comparison with the expected Lyman-alpha brightness distribution for Ly-alpha resonance scattering. Other images in the 1200-1700 { Angstroms} region show band structures parallel to the equator with fading contrast toward the center and the limb. Spectroscopic observations were made in the 1200-1700 { Angstroms} (G140L) and 1245-1298 { Angstroms} (G140M) regions at ~ 5 { Angstroms} resolution to map the H_2 airglow and the UV absorbents along the STIS slit. Preliminary results indicate that a C_2H_2 absorption signature is clearly observed in the solar ultraviolet reflected spectrum. The ethylene absorption may be mapped to derive variations of the acetylene abundance. The H_2 FUV airglow shows both the fluorescence and the electron impact components. Its spatial variation is described and compared with the expected airglow distribution. We acknowledge funding by NASA and by the PRODEX program of the European space agency. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of hot oxygen on thermospheric O I UV airglow
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Cotton, D. M. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1999), 104

The role of nonthermal oxygen atoms in the vertical distribution of the O I 989 Å EUV multiplet intensity is investigated using a thermospheric radiative transfer code. The superthermal oxygen ... [more ▼]

The role of nonthermal oxygen atoms in the vertical distribution of the O I 989 Å EUV multiplet intensity is investigated using a thermospheric radiative transfer code. The superthermal oxygen concentration and temperatures are derived from the energy distribution functions of the O([SUP]3[/SUP]P) atoms calculated by a Monte Carlo stochastic model, and their effect on UV radiative transfer is compared to sounding rocket observations. The calculated intensity increase associated with the perturbation of the Doppler profile by the presence of hot O([SUP]3[/SUP]P) atoms is shown to be insufficient to account for the set of sounding rocket EUV intensity data. [less ▲]

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See detailThermalization of <formula alphabet="latin">O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) atoms in the thermosphere
Shematovich, Valery; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Bisikalo, Dimitry V et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1999), 104

Measurements of the Doppler width of the 6300 Å airglow emission line have been extensively used to determine the thermospheric temperature. This technique is based on the assumption that the bulk of the ... [more ▼]

Measurements of the Doppler width of the 6300 Å airglow emission line have been extensively used to determine the thermospheric temperature. This technique is based on the assumption that the bulk of the emitting O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) atoms are thermalized in the region of the airglow source (200-300 km). A Monte Carlo stochastic model is used to calculate the energy distribution function of O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) atoms in the daytime and nighttime thermosphere. Hot O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) atoms are produced by exothermic processes and their thermalization is controlled by the competition between radiation, collisional quenching, and relaxation. It is found that the O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) temperature departs from the background gas temperature not only in the upper thermosphere but also in the region of the bulk 6300 Å emission. At 300 km for low solar activity conditions, the model predicts an excess O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) temperature of ~180 K during daytime and ~950 K at night. The temperature departure persists at lower altitudes as a result of the major contribution of the O[SUB]2[/SUB][SUP]+[/SUP] dissociative recombination source of hot [SUP]1[/SUP]D atoms. Experimental evidence based on the Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite confirms the existence of an O([SUP]1[/SUP]D) temperature excess over the mass spectrometer/incoherent scatter (MSIS) value. It is concluded that temperatures deduced from the 6300 Å airglow line width may significantly exceed the ambient gas temperature in a way depending on solar activity, local time, and observation geometry. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interannual change of atmospheric CO2: contribution of subtropical ecosystems?
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Nemry, B.; François, Louis ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (1999), 26(2), 243-246

The global terrestrial carbon cycle model CARAIB (CARbon Assimilation In the Biosphere) is used to study the response of the terrestrial ecosystems to the large scale climate variations over the period ... [more ▼]

The global terrestrial carbon cycle model CARAIB (CARbon Assimilation In the Biosphere) is used to study the response of the terrestrial ecosystems to the large scale climate variations over the period 1980-1993. The global net carbon exchange flux with the atmosphere is calculated and compared with the terrestrial contribution derived from the deconvolution of the atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C measurements. A fairly large CO2 biospheric source is predicted during the strong El Nino events of 1982-83 and 1986-87 as a consequence of the induced global warming. The direct and indirect temperature controls of the primacy production and respiration dominate the CO2 anomaly. An analysis of the relative contribution by latitudinal bands and ecosystems shows that low-latitude vegetation dominates the variability at the El Nino time scale. In savannas, the model indicates that the interannual changes result, to a large extent, from the control of soil water content on gross primary production (GPP). In the tropical cain forests, both respiration and GPP contribute to the response of the net biospheric flux. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing global models of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP): analysis of the seasonal atmospheric CO2 signal
Nemry, B.; François, Louis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Global Change Biology (1999), 5(Suppl. 1), 65-76

Eight terrestrial biospheric models (TBMs) calculating the monthly distributions of both net primary productivity (NPP) and soil heterotrophic respiration (R-H) in the Potsdam NPP Model Intercomparison ... [more ▼]

Eight terrestrial biospheric models (TBMs) calculating the monthly distributions of both net primary productivity (NPP) and soil heterotrophic respiration (R-H) in the Potsdam NPP Model Intercomparison workshop are used to simulate seasonal patterns of atmospheric CO2 concentration. For each model, we used net ecosystem productivity (NEP=NPP-R-H) as the source function in the TM2 atmospheric transport model from the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology. Comparing the simulated concentration fields with detrended measurements from 25 monitoring stations spread over the world, we found that the decreasing seasonal amplitude from north to south is rather well reproduced by all the models, though the amplitudes are slightly too low in the north. The agreement between the simulated and observed seasonality is good in the northern hemisphere, but poor in the southern hemisphere, even when the ocean is accounted for. Based on a Fourier analysis of the calculated zonal atmospheric signals, tropical NEP plays a key role in the seasonal cycle of the atmospheric CO2 in the whole southern hemisphere. The relatively poor match between measured and predicted atmospheric CO2 in this hemisphere suggests problems with all the models. The simulation of water relations, a dominant regulator of NEP in the tropics, is a leading candidate for the source of these problems. [less ▲]

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See detailJovian thermal structure inferred from the energy degradation of auroral electrons.
Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Waite, J H, Jr

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1999)

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See detailHST/STIS images of UV auroral footprints from Io, Europa, and Ganymede.
Clarke, J. T.; Ajello, J.; Ballester, G. E. et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1999)

Ultraviolet images of Jupiter's aurora have been obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since September 1997 with much higher sensitivity than ... [more ▼]

Ultraviolet images of Jupiter's aurora have been obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since September 1997 with much higher sensitivity than earlier cameras. Higher sensitivity permits shorter exposures, freezing Jupiter's rotation and providing the highest angular resolution obtained to date. This combination of sensitivity and resolution has revealed new emissions from the magnetic footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede, which will be reported and discussed. Io's auroral footprint, while well studied with earlier cameras, appears highly extended at a low brightness in the wake or plasma flow direction. Ganymede's auroral footprint emission is now well established from the repeated appearance of this feature under the magnetic field trace of Ganymede, and there is initial evidence for auroral emission at Europa's magnetic footprint. Ganymede's auroral footprint appears consistently equatorward of the main auroral oval, which clearly constrains the main oval auroral currents to originate from beyond about 20 R_J. The observation that the main oval emissions are observed to corotate with Jupiter's magnetic field further constrains the origin of these currents to be within about 30 R_J, so that the source region for the main oval auroral is now fairly well constrained to a region in Jupiter's middle magnetosphere and within the current sheet. This work was supported by NASA under grant GO-7308.01-96A to the University of Michigan. [less ▲]

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See detailHST/GHRS ultraviolet spectroscopy and model diagnostics of the Jovian aurora.
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Dols, V.; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1999)

A model coupling a detailed synthetic spectrum of the H_2 Lyman and Werner band systems with an electron energy degradation code is applied to the analysis of 7 GHRS spectra of the 1200-1700 { Angstroms ... [more ▼]

A model coupling a detailed synthetic spectrum of the H_2 Lyman and Werner band systems with an electron energy degradation code is applied to the analysis of 7 GHRS spectra of the 1200-1700 { Angstroms} region obtained with a ~ 5 { Angstroms} resolution at various locations in the north and south Jovian aurora. The observed color ratios indicate that the characteristic energy of the assumed initial Maxwellian distribution ranges between 17 and 40 keV. A clear signature of acetylene is observed near the absorption peaks at 1520, 1480 and 1440 { Angstroms}. The C_2H_2 column overlying the emission peak varies from 0.02 to 0.2 of the methane column. A better fit is obtained for some spectra when ethane absorption is added. The changing mixing ratios relative to methane are attributed to perturbations by heat released by the fast electron thermalization and/or perturbations to the hydrocarbon chemistry resulting from the production of H atoms by the aurora. A spectrum of the Io magnetic footprint and its trailing tail shows ultraviolet color and hydrocarbon absorption charateristics quite similar to some of the main oval spectra. This observation implies that the electrons of the Io flux tube are energized to a few tens of keV, similar to the electron precipitated in the main ovals and polar caps. Echelle spectra between 1216 and 1220 { Angstroms} at 0.07 { Angstroms} resolution are also compared with the model best fitting the closely spaced in time mid-resolution spectrum. It is found that the effective H_2 rovibrational temperature associated with the Echelle spectra is significantly higher than predicted by the model. A steep temperature gradient near the methane homopause due to large heating by auroral precipitation is a plausible explanation for this difference. We acknowledge funding by NASA and the PRODEX program of the European Space Agency. [less ▲]

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See detailHubble Space Telescope imaging of Jupiter's UV aurora during the Galileo orbiter mission
Clarke, John T; Ben Jaffel, Lotfi; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1998), 103

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) images of Jupiter's aurora have been obtained close in time with Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) spectra and in situ particles ... [more ▼]

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) images of Jupiter's aurora have been obtained close in time with Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) spectra and in situ particles, fields, and plasma wave measurements between June 1996 and July 1997, overlapping Galileo orbits G1, G2, G7, G8, and C9. This paper presents HST images of Jupiter's aurora as a first step toward a comparative analysis of the auroral images with the in situ Galileo data. The WFPC 2 images appear similar to earlier auroral images, with the main ovals at similar locations to those observed over the preceding 2 years, and rapidly variable emissions poleward of the main ovals. Further examples have been observed of the equatorward surge of the auroral oval over 140-180° longitude as this region moves from local morning to afternoon. Comparison of the WFPC 2 reference auroral ovals north and south with the VIP4 planetary magnetic field model suggests that the main ovals map along magnetic field lines exceeding 15R[SUB]J[/SUB], and that the Io footprint locations have lead angles of 0-10° from the instantaneous magnetic projection. There was an apparent dawn auroral storm on June 23, 1996, and projections of the three dawn storms imaged with HST to date demonstrate that these appear consistently along the WFPC 2 reference oval. Auroral emissions have been consistently observed from Io's magnetic footprints on Jupiter. Possible systematic variations in brightness are explored, within factor of 6 variations in brightness with time. Images are also presented marked with expected locations of any auroral footprints associated with the satellites Europa and Ganymede, with localized emissions observed at some times but not at other times. [less ▲]

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