References of "Frederich, Michel"
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See detailEthnopharmacologie et développement de nouveaux médicaments d’origine naturelle
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg

Scientific conference (2015, September 01)

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See detailIsolation and identification of potential antimalarial compounds from endemic plants of Reunion Island
Bordignon, Annélise ULg; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 16)

Malaria is known as the most important parasitic disease around the world with 584 000 malaria deaths worldwide in 2013 [1]. Due to the problem of increased parasite resistance, natural products from ... [more ▼]

Malaria is known as the most important parasitic disease around the world with 584 000 malaria deaths worldwide in 2013 [1]. Due to the problem of increased parasite resistance, natural products from endemic plants of Reunion Island, hot spot of promising biodiversity, could represent an important source of new antimalarial drugs. The aim of this thesis research focuses on the evaluation of potential antiplasmodial activity of medicinal plants from Reunion Island. A global screening of plants extracts from Reunion Island was performed on Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 chloroquine-sensitive strain revealed by colorimetric method as described in previous reports [2]. Monimia rotundifolia was then selected due to its promising in vitro activity against Plasmodium. Bioguided fractionation was realized using Prep HPLC techniques and led to the isolation of aporphine-type alkaloids from Monimia rotundifolia leaves dichloromethane extract. Further investigations are in process to confirm the antiplasmodial activities of these alkaloids and to determine their structures. References: [1] WHO, World Malaria report 2014. [2] Jansen O. et al., Evaluation of 13 selected medicinal plants from Burkina Faso for their antiplasmodial properties. J Ethnopharmacol 2010, 130:143-150. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolomics analysis of Galium odoratum (L.) Scop.: impact of the plant population origin and growth conditions.
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Martin, Bertrand; De Tullio, Pascal ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 16)

Galium odoratum is a plant used in traditional medicine and to prepare beverages. This work aimed at studying the impact of plant origin and growth conditions on the metabolite content of the plant ... [more ▼]

Galium odoratum is a plant used in traditional medicine and to prepare beverages. This work aimed at studying the impact of plant origin and growth conditions on the metabolite content of the plant. Material and methods- Aerial biomass of Galium odoratum was collected from five natural populations (in situ conditions) and from controlled environment (ex situ conditions). Results- Quantitative analysis of selected phytochemicals including phenylpropranoids and iridoids showed clear differences between the plants from nature and those of controlled growth conditions as well as internal variation within the group. The metabolomic approach emphasized the decrease of the secondary metabolites pool paralleled by an increase of the carbohydrates in ex situ conditions. Conclusion- Metabolomics approaches using 1H-NMR and HPLC is worth to consider for studying the impact of climate factors on the regulation of the phytochemical profile in relation to the origin of the plant material. [less ▲]

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See detailEthnopharmacology and malaria in Africa
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Muganga, raymond et al

Conference (2015, July 12)

According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died ... [more ▼]

According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died before their fifth birthday, still in 2013. Malaria is caused by a parasite, Plasmodium sp. and transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes. The problem of parasite resistance towards common available medicines such as chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, is increasing. In this context, the vegetal kingdom remains the main source of pharmacologically active compounds against this parasitic infection as attested by the famous quinine, isolated from Cinchona sp., artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua and also atovaquone derived from lapachol found in several Bignoniaceae. All these substances are related to plants with traditional use against fever and malaria. Beside these well-known examples, various new antiplasmodial compounds are frequently discovered from Nature, particularly following an ethnopharmacological approach, as reviewed by several authors in recent years [2-6]. Then, the pharmacological and phytochemical study of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias can be of first interest not only to discover new antimalarial “lead compounds”, but also to valorize local vegetal species whose efficacy and safety would have been demonstrated in laboratory and clinical investigations [7]. As demonstrated in several works from Willcox [8], better knowledge of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias and local valorization of validated traditional remedies in Improved Traditional Medicine (ITM) could allow the access to effective, standardized, available and affordable therapeutics for management of malaria by local populations. After this introductive section, the second part of the talk will be dedicated to the presentation of some results obtained in Liège with Dicoma tomentosa from Burkina-Faso [9], Strychnos icaja from Cameroun [10] and Terminalia mollis from Rwanda [11]. 1. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014, Geneva (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world_malaria_report_2014/en/). 2. Batista R, Silva Ade J Jr, de Oliveira AB: Plant-derived antimalarial agents: new leads and efficient phytomedicines. Part II. Non-alkaloidal natural products. Molecules 2009, 14:3037-72. 3. Bero J, Frédérich M, Quetin-Leclercq J : Antimalarial compounds isolated from plants used in traditional medicine. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 2009, 61:1401–1433. 4. Bero J and Quetin-Leclercq J: Natural products published in 2009 from plants traditionally used to treat malaria. Planta Medica 2011, 77:631-40. 5. Kaur K, Jain M, Kaur T, Jain R: Antimalarials from nature. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 2009, 17:3229–3256. 6. Nogueira CR and Lopes LMX: Antiplasmodial Natural Products. Molecules 2011, 16:2146-2190 7. Ginsburg H and Deharo E: A call for using natural compounds in the development of new antimalarial treatments – an introduction. Malaria Journal 2011, 10 (suppl. 1):S1 8. Willcox M, Graz B, Falquet J, Diakite C, Giani S, Diallo D: A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an antimalarial phytomedicine. Malaria journal 2011, 10(suppl1):S8 9. Jansen, O., Tits, M., Angenot, L., Nicolas, J.-P., De Mol, P., Nikiema, J.-B., & Frédérich, M : Anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma tomentosa (Asteraceae) and identification of urospermal A-15-O-acetate as the main active compound. Malaria Journal 2012, 11, 289. 10. Tchinda, A. T., Jansen, O., Nyemb, J.-N., Tits, M., Dive, G., Angenot, L., & Frédérich, M. Strychnobaillonine, an unsymmetrical bisindole alkaloid with an unprecedented skeleton from Strychnos icaja roots. Journal of Natural Products 2014, 77(4), 1078–82. 11. Muganga, R., Angenot, L., Tits, M., & Frédérich, M : In vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of three Rwandan medicinal plants and identification of their active compounds. Planta Medica 2013, 80(6), 482-489. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial activity
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Bordignon, Annélise ULg; Campos, Pierre-Éric et al

Poster (2015, July)

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See detailIdentification of antiplasmodial compounds isolated from endemic plants of Reunion Island
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Campos, Pierre-Éric et al

Conference (2015, May)

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See detailPhytochemical Profile and Biological Activity Evaluation of Zanthoxylum heterophyllum Leaves against Malaria
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Mareatefau, Hinerava; Jansen, Olivia ULg et al

in Planta Medica Letters (2015), 2

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiplasmodial properties of Zanthoxylum heterophyllum, an endemic plant from the Mascarene Islands. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of ethyl acetate and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiplasmodial properties of Zanthoxylum heterophyllum, an endemic plant from the Mascarene Islands. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane crude extracts obtained from leaf samples collected on Reunion Island was evaluated on the Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 chloroquine-sensitive strain using a colorimetric method. The major active compound was identified by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The best antiplasmodial activity was obtained for the ethyl acetate extract (15 µg/mL < IC50 < 50 µg/mL). The major compound was identified as a sanshool derivative, an alkylamide compound that has moderate antimalarial activity (IC50 = 11.3 µg/mL). This is the first report of the presence of a sanshool derivative in Z. heterophyllum. The moderate antiplasmodial activity of hydroxy-γ-isosanshool was demonstrated for the first time. [less ▲]

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See detailFood Compounds from Meadow Grasshoppers
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 15)

Eating insects as food, particularly grasshopper is practiced in many cultures throughout the world. Meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) is commonly found in Europe and some part of Asia. It is ... [more ▼]

Eating insects as food, particularly grasshopper is practiced in many cultures throughout the world. Meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) is commonly found in Europe and some part of Asia. It is already known that grasshoppers of Chorthippus species are consumed as food in countries such as Thailand. With the aim of evaluating the nutritional potential of this insect species the proximate nutritional composition of grasshoppers caught from the local fields was realized. Besides this, the fatty acid profile of extracted lipids, amino acid profile and mineral composition of the insect was also revealed. Results suggest that meadow grasshopper is an excellent source of protein and essential amino acids. Lipids extracted from the grasshopper have an interesting fatty acid composition. Also the grasshopper contains some minerals that are important for body. With such protein content, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile of the lipids and mineral content this grasshopper species could present an interesting alternate to conventional protein sources. [less ▲]

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See detailLes plantes qui nous soignent : de la tradition à la médecine moderne
Frederich, Michel ULg

Scientific conference (2015, February 23)

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See detailMultiplicity editing in long-range heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments: Application to natural products
Sauri, Josep; Sistare, E.; Frederich, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2015, February)

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See detailPROXIMATE ANALYSIS OF SEEDS FROM SOME FIELD BORDER FLOWERING STRIPS
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

in Scientific Bulletin. Series F. Biotechnologies (2015), XIX

Field border flowering strips are commonly grown throughout the world mainly to enhance biodiversity. However besides their basic function they can also yield numerous compounds which could be interesting ... [more ▼]

Field border flowering strips are commonly grown throughout the world mainly to enhance biodiversity. However besides their basic function they can also yield numerous compounds which could be interesting for wide range of industries such as food, pharmaceutical, etc. With the aim of valorization, proximate compositional analysis of seeds from some commonly grown flowering strips: Galium verum, Hypericum perforatum, Leontodon hispidus, Lotus corniculatus, Lythrum salicaria, Origanum vulgare and Trifolium pratense was realized. The protein content of residue left after the lipid extraction was also determined for exploring possibilities of its utilization as a protein source. Results suggest that seeds from some of these plants can be a potential source to render food compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailLes nouveaux outils de diagnostic et de pronostic de la myopathie atypique
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULg; BOEMER, François ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Proceeding de la 41ème Journée de la Recherche équine (2015)

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy ... [more ▼]

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy (AM). This alterations leads to a characteristic biochemical profile of acylcarnitines (AC) that enables to confirm the diagnosis of AM. This study aims at validating a methodology for the dosage of hypoglycin A in vegetal extracts but also in blood. In addition, the biochemical profile in AC has been determined in AM cases (5 survivors and 13 deceased) and in 5 horses suffering from exercise-induced myopathy. The AC profiles of these horses have been compared to the one of healthy horses (n = 35). This study showed that hypoglycin A was present in seeds and spring seedlings of sycamore and also in blood of AM cases horses. In addition, the establishment of AC profile contributes to the diagnostic and helps to assess the prognosis of AM cases. [less ▲]

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See detailSemisynthesis and in Vitro Photodynamic Activity Evaluations of Halogenated and Glycosylated Derivatives of Pheophorbide a
Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg; Mathieu, Véronique; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in European Journal of Organic Chemistry (2015), 2015(27), 6061-6074

The present work focuses on the semisynthesis of halogenated and glycosylated derivatives of pheophorbide a (Pha). Because of the low reaction yields enocuntered en route to halogenated derivatives, we ... [more ▼]

The present work focuses on the semisynthesis of halogenated and glycosylated derivatives of pheophorbide a (Pha). Because of the low reaction yields enocuntered en route to halogenated derivatives, we then focused only on the semisynthesis of glycosylated derivatives of Pha with the aim at enhancing the Pha specificity for cancer cells by introducing β-galactose moieties expected to bind gal-1. We applied LC-SPE-NMR/MS, to facilitate the direct identification of glycosylated derivatives. The transposition of these analytical methods to a preparative scale facilitated the isolation of glycosylated compounds in quantities sufficient to evaluate in vitro photodynamic efficacies. The in vitro growth inhibitory activity of semisynthesized compounds was then evaluated using the MTT colorimetric assay in the presence and absence of light. However, this pharmacological evaluation method seems to be unable to efficiently yield information about carbohydrate effects in relation to possible compound specificities for gal-1 overexpressed by B16F10 cancer cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThe emergence of metabolomics as a key discipline in the drug discovery process
Fillet, Marianne ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg

in Drug Discovery Today: Technologies (2015), 13

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See detailA new ent-clerodane diterpenoid from Crassocephalum bauchiense Huch. (Asteraceae).
Tchinda, Alembert T.; Mouokeu, Simplice R.; Ngono, Rosalie A. N. et al

in Natural product research (2015), 29(21), 1990-1994

A phytochemical investigation of the whole plant of Crassocephalum bauchiense Huch. resulted in the isolation of a new clerodane diterpenoid, ent-2beta,18,19-trihydroxycleroda-3,13-dien-16,15-olide (1 ... [more ▼]

A phytochemical investigation of the whole plant of Crassocephalum bauchiense Huch. resulted in the isolation of a new clerodane diterpenoid, ent-2beta,18,19-trihydroxycleroda-3,13-dien-16,15-olide (1), together with two known flavonoids 3',5-dihydroxy-4',5',6,7,8-pentamethoxyflavone (2) and 4',5-dihydroxy-3',5',6,7,8-pentamethoxyflavone (3). The compounds were tested against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Compound 2 showed weak activity (IC50 = 10.1 g/mL) whilst compounds 1 and 3 were inactive. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by using detailed spectral analyses, especially 1H and 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, NOESY, HMBC and HR-ESI-MS. [less ▲]

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See detailTerritoires périurbains : développement, enjeux et perspectives dans les pays du Sud. Une introduction générale
Halleux, Jean-Marie ULg; Courtejoie, Fabienne ULg; Dawance, Sophie ULg et al

in Bogaert, Jan; Halleux, Jean-Marie (Eds.) Territoires périurbains Développement, enjeux et perspectives dans les pays du Sud (2015)

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See detailSteroidal Glycosides from the Flowers of Allium leucanthum
Mskhiladze, Lasha; Chincharadze, David; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang et al

in Chemistry of Natural Compounds (2015), 51(5), 900-904

Furostanol and spirostanol glycosides 1 and 2 were isolated from the flowers of Allium leucanthum, a Caucasian endemic species that grows in Georgia. The structures were established on the base of ... [more ▼]

Furostanol and spirostanol glycosides 1 and 2 were isolated from the flowers of Allium leucanthum, a Caucasian endemic species that grows in Georgia. The structures were established on the base of chemical evidence and spectral analyses ( 1 H, 13 C NMR, 1 H– 1 H COSY, 1 H– 13 C COSY, HMBC, and HR-MS) data. Compound 1 (leucofuranoside A) was reported for the first time and was identified as 26-O-β-Dglucopyranosyl-(25R)-5α-furostane-3β,6β-diol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranoside. Compound 2 was identified as (25R)-5α-spirostane-3β,6β-diol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranoside and described for the first time in the genus Allium. [less ▲]

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See detailNetamines O-S, Five New Tricyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from the Madagascar Sponge Biemna laboutei, and Their Antimalarial Activities.
Gros, Emmanuelle; Martin, Marie-Therese; Sorres, Jonathan et al

in Chemistry & biodiversity (2015), 12(11), 1725-33

In our continuing program to isolate new compounds from the Madagascar sponge Biemna laboutei, five new tricyclic guanidine alkaloids, netamines O - S (1-5, resp.), have been identified together with the ... [more ▼]

In our continuing program to isolate new compounds from the Madagascar sponge Biemna laboutei, five new tricyclic guanidine alkaloids, netamines O - S (1-5, resp.), have been identified together with the known compounds netamine E (6) and mirabilin J (7). The structures of all new netamines were assigned on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. Their relative configurations were established by analysis of ROESY data and comparison with literature data. Netamines O, P, and Q, which were isolated in sufficient quantities, were tested for their cytotoxic activities against KB cells and their activities against the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Netamines O and Q were found to be moderately cytotoxic. Netamines O, P, and Q exhibited antiplasmodial activities with IC50 values of 16.99+/-4.12, 32.62+/-3.44, and 8.37+/-1.35 muM, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure-activity relationship of hybrids of Cinchona alkaloids and bile acids with in vitro antiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activities.
Leverrier, Aurelie; Bero, Joanne; Cabrera, Julian et al

in European journal of medicinal chemistry (2015), 100

In this work, a series of hybrid compounds were tested as antiparasitic substances. These hybrids were prepared from bile acids and a series of antiparasitic Cinchona alkaloids by the formation of a ... [more ▼]

In this work, a series of hybrid compounds were tested as antiparasitic substances. These hybrids were prepared from bile acids and a series of antiparasitic Cinchona alkaloids by the formation of a covalent C-C bond via a decarboxylative Barton-Zard reaction between the two entities. The bile acids showed only weak antiparasitic properties, but all the hybrids exhibited high in vitro activities (IC50: 0.48-5.39 muM) against Trypanosoma brucei. These hybrids were more active than their respective parent alkaloids (up to a 135 fold increase in activity), and displayed good selectivity indices. Aditionally, all these compounds inhibited the in vitro growth of a chloroquine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7: IC50: 36.1 nM to 8.72 muM), and the most active hybrids had IC50s comparable to that of artemisinin (IC50: 36 nM). Some structure-activity relationships among the group of 48 hybrids are discussed. The increase in antiparasitic activity may be explained by an improvement in bioavailability, since the more lipophilic derivatives showed the lowest IC50s. [less ▲]

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