References of "Focant, Jean-François"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLevels and trends of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in camel milk (Camelus bactrianus and Camelus dromedarius) from Kazakhstan
Konuspayeva, Gaukhar; Faye, Bernard; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Chemosphere (2011), 85

To date, despite the fact it represents a very important part of the national dairy production, no data are available concerning the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs ... [more ▼]

To date, despite the fact it represents a very important part of the national dairy production, no data are available concerning the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in camel milk from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Selected PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs were measured in pools of milk from camels (n = 15) located in various places of Kazakhstan (Almaty, Atyrau, Aralsk, Shymkent) and sampled at two different seasons for two different species (Camelus bactrianus and Camelus dromedarius). Non-dioxin-like (NDL- )PCB concentrations (6.3 ± 2.7 ng gÿ1 fat, median 5.1 ng gÿ1 fat, range 0.6–17.4 ng gÿ1 fat) were far below the maximum value of 40 ng gÿ1 fat proposed by the EU. Dioxin-like (DL-)PCB concentrations (1.7 ± 0.7 ng gÿ1 fat, median 1.5 ng gÿ1 fat, range 0.3–4.2 ng gÿ1 fat) and the NDL-PCB to DL-PCB ratio (4.3) were similar to what is reported in EU for cow-based dairy products. PCB 52 and PCB 101 appeared to be proportionally more present in Kazakh camel milk samples (>60% of the sum of the 6 indicator NDL-PCBs) than in European cow milk samples (<10% of the sum of the 6 indicator NDL-PCBs), indicating possible differences in the route of exposure to PCBs in Kazakhstan. PCB 105 and PCB 118 appeared to be present at higher concentrations in camel milk (>80% of the sum of the 12 DL-PCBs). PCB 105, PCB 118 and PCB 156 were the major congeners for DL-PCBs, accounting for 92% of the sum of concentrations of DL-PCBs (88% for Belgian cows). In terms of TEQ, PCB 126 and PCB 118 are the major contributors and represent, respectively, 80% and 14% of the DL-PCB TEQWHO05 concentrations. No significant interracial or geographical trends were observed for NDL- and DL-PCB profiles. However, concentrations of all DL-PCBs appeared to be significantly higher for samples collected in Atyrau region. 2,3,7,8-TCDD level (mean 0.08 ± 0.07 pg gÿ1 fat, median 0.08 pg gÿ1 fat, range 0.00–0.18 pg gÿ1 fat, 60% > LOQs) were very low for all samples and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF was the major contributor (27%) to the PCDD/F TEQWHO05. Considering the total TEQWHO05 (sum of DL-PCBs and PCDD/Fs), DL-PCB and PCDD/F contributed for 73% and 27%, respectively. A decrease of only 1% of the total TEQ was observed when using the TEFWHO05 scale instead of the TEFWHO98 scale. Two samples collected in the region of Atyrau exceeded the EU maximum level value of 6.00 pg TEQWHO98 gÿ1 fat (6.4 pg TEQWHO05 gÿ1 fat and 6.9 pg TEQWHO05 gÿ1 fat). Both samples exceeded the EU action level for the sum of DL-PCBs. Based on the fact that camel milk is used to prepare popular traditional fermented drinks like shubat, this suggests that the human exposure in the Caspian Sea region of Atyrau should be expected to be higher than in the other regions studied here. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLevels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in Camel Milk (Camelus Bactrianus and Camelus Dromedarius) from Kazakhstan
Konuspeyeva, G; Faye, B; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2011), 73

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) for Environmental Forensic Investigations in Developing Countries
de Vos, Jayne; Dixon, Roger; Vermeulen, Gerhard et al

in Chemosphere (2011), 82

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDioxins in Human Milk from Different Regions of France: Pilot of the French Longitudinal Study of Children (ELFE)
Vandentoren, S; Frery, N; Bidondo, ML et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2011), 73

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReproduction of European eel jeopardised by high levels of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs
Geeraerts, C.; Focant, Jean-François ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2011), 409

ioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analysed in muscle tissue from yellow phased European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from 38 sites in Belgium. Dioxin concentrations in eel ... [more ▼]

ioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analysed in muscle tissue from yellow phased European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from 38 sites in Belgium. Dioxin concentrations in eel vary considerably between sampling locations, indicating that yellow eel is a good indicator of local pollution levels. Measured levels of dioxin-like PCBs are much higher than those of the dioxins and furans. In the majority of the sites, eel has levels considered to be detrimental for their reproduction. Field levels of dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs are therefore suggested as an additional causal factor contributing to the decline of the European eel. 42% of the sampling sites show especially dioxin-like PCB levels exceeding the European consumption level (with a factor 3 on average). Human consumption of eel, especially in these highly contaminated sites, seems unjustified. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAttogram level measurement of POPs in human: From adipose tissue to DBS
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Welch; Turner et al

Conference (2010, December)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
See detailA quick and dirty introduction to GCxGC
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)
See detailImplementation of Automated Procedures in Routine at CART
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
See detailThe Total Solution for Rapid Sample Preparation: The Procedure
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDietary intake of PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB for the Belgian population
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Windal, I.; Vandevijvere, S. et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDioxin levels in European eels, a Belgian study
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Geeraerts, C.; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPLE for extraction of dioxins in animal feed and ingredients
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Scholl, Georges ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2010, September), 72

Within the entire complex procedure required to measure dioxins and related compounds in biological matrices, the extraction step is often seen as a well controlled step. Although maybe true for many ... [more ▼]

Within the entire complex procedure required to measure dioxins and related compounds in biological matrices, the extraction step is often seen as a well controlled step. Although maybe true for many human and food-related matrices, the situation is very different for animal feed and feed ingredients. Specific European guidelines (e.g. Commission Directive 2006/13/EC, Commission Regulation (EC) No 152/2009) exist for animal feed but only list general requirements for the various stages of the procedure. The liberty is left to laboratories to select, for example, the tools used for the extraction steps. This has the advantage to allow ‘in-house’ methods to be used, as long as they satisfy with all the requirements of the EU Regulation. In that context, it is foreseen that the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) will soon propose a standard for the determination of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in animal feed that would be the reference method to be used to solve potential issues in case of dispute over results reported from different laboratories. A major point of concern is that it has been reported earlier1 that most commonly accepted extraction procedure can conduct to significantly different results for the extraction of dioxins and related compounds in feed and feed additives such as mineral clays and various oxides. Several non-instrumental and instrumental automated approaches are available for extraction. Soxhlet extractors have long been the most used tools for non-instrumental extraction of solids. They have proven to be very efficient but some limitations encouraged the development of other approaches based on instrumental techniques. For feed extraction, pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) (also branded as accelerated solvent extraction ASE®) is the technique of choice for high sample throughput. This study reports on the investigation of the use of various solvent mixtures, extraction temperatures, and instruments (parallel PLE, sequential ASE®) for the extraction of 17 PCDD/Fs and 12 dioxin-like PCBs in mineral clay, bovine feed, fish meal, and in-house quality control animal compound feed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe smell of death - a new method to detect buried remains: GCxGC-TOFMS
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg; Brasseur, Catherine ULg; De Koning, Sjaak et al

Conference (2010, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (26 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTotal Solution for Rapid Sample Preparation
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Conference (2010, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA ‘cook book’ method for dioxin & PCBs analysis
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Shirkhan; Patterson Jr

Poster (2010, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)