References of "Feyers, Dorothée"
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See detailNeural network involved in young and elderly adults
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Cognitive Aging Conference (2008, April 11)

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring ... [more ▼]

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring judgment about self vs. other in the context of a first (1PP) or third (3PP) perspective-taking (Ruby et al., submitted). Here, we have performed functional connectivity analyses to determine the network of cerebral areas associated to the performance of young and elderly subjects. Results indicate that, in the 1PP condition, activity of the VMPFC is related to the medial orbito-frontal, posterior and inferior temporal and parietal areas in elderly, but to the occipital cortex only in young subjects. In the 3PP condition, functional connectivity exist between the VMPFC and posterior temporal and lateral orbito-frontal areas in elderly, but with occipital and parietal areas only in young subjects. The cerebral areas associated to VMPFC activity in young subjects were previously described as involved both in autobiographic memory retrieval and mentalizing processes. With regard to elderly, the cerebral network evidenced is related to autobiographic memory retrieval (parietal and temporal areas) but also to the attribution of emotional valence to the adjectives (medial orbito-frontal) and perspective taking both in 1PP and 3PP conditions (lateral orbito-frontal). These results indicate (1) that the VMPFC is connected to a larger cerebral network in elderly than in young subjects during self judgements; (2) that young subjects perform the task on the basis of autobiographical information retrieval only, while elderly subjects use supplementary, more reflexive, cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailImagerie cérébrale de la réflexion sur soi
Salmon, Eric ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

Precise brain regions are activated when a subject gives a judgment on himself. Those are the medial parietal cortex, essentially related to episodic memory processing, and the ventromedial prefrontal ... [more ▼]

Precise brain regions are activated when a subject gives a judgment on himself. Those are the medial parietal cortex, essentially related to episodic memory processing, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, recruited for evaluating the personal valence of an information. These regions are not activated in Alzheimer's disease. The decrease of awareness for own deficits in a patient with Alzheimer's disease would depend on a reduction of episodic memory capacities and a worsening of judgment for self significance. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural network involved in self-judgment in young and elderly adults
Feyers, Dorothée ULg

Master of advanced studies dissertation (2008)

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See detailA Comparison of Unawareness in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, Daniela; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(2), 176-9

BACKGROUND: Loss of insight is a core diagnostic feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and anosognosia is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AIM: To compare unawareness (anosognosia) for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Loss of insight is a core diagnostic feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and anosognosia is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AIM: To compare unawareness (anosognosia) for different symptoms, measured with a discrepancy score between patient's and caregiver's assessment, in AD and FTD. METHOD: In a prospective, multi-centre study, 123 patients with probable AD, selected according to the NINCDS-ADRDA procedure, were matched for age, sex, education, disease duration and dementia severity to patients with FTD (n = 41), selected according to international consensus criteria. A research complaint questionnaire was used to obtained patient's and caregiver's assessment concerning neuropsychological and behavioural symptoms. Data were compared in each group and between groups. Unawareness (measured by discrepancy scores) was compared between patients with AD and FTD. RESULTS: The caregivers generally assessed symptoms more severely than did patients, but both patient groups reported changes in affect (depressive mood or irritability) as their caregivers did. Unawareness was greater in patients with FTD than in patients with AD for language and executive difficulties, and for changes in behaviour and daily activities. CONCLUSION: The main finding is that unawareness was observed in both patients with FTD and patients with AD for most clinical domains. However, qualitative and quantitative differences showed that lack of awareness was greater in patients with FTD. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reflection across time: cortical midline structures differentiate between present and past selves
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2008), 3(3), 244-252

The processing of personal changes across time and the ability to differentiate between representations of present and past selves are crucial for developing a mature sense of identity. In this study, we ... [more ▼]

The processing of personal changes across time and the ability to differentiate between representations of present and past selves are crucial for developing a mature sense of identity. In this study, we explored the neural correlates of self-reflection across time using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). College undergraduates were asked to reflect on their own psychological characteristics and those of an intimate other, for both the present time period (i.e. at college) and a past time period (i.e. high school years) that involved significant personal changes. Cortical midline structures (CMS) were commonly recruited by the four reflective tasks (reflecting on the present self, past self, present other and past other), relative to a control condition (making valence judgments). More importantly, however, the degree of activity in CMS also varied significantly according to the target of reflection, with the ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex being more recruited when reflecting on the present self than when reflecting on the past self or when reflecting on the other person. These findings suggest that CMS may contribute to differentiate between representations of present and past selves. [less ▲]

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See detailLa maladie d'Alzheimer
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Dujardin, Kathy; Lemaire, Patrick (Eds.) Neuropsychologie du vieillissement normal et pathologique (2008)

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See detailExploration of the neuronal substrates of Directed Forgetting with fMRI.
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2007, June 26)

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See detailExploration of the neuronal substrates of Directed Forgetting with fMRI
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2007, June 01)

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See detailExploration des processus d'inhibition dans le paradigme d'oubli dirigé.
Feyers, Dorothée ULg

Master's dissertation (2006)

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See detailThe role of selective rehearsal and attentional inhibition in directed forgetting
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2006, May 19)

The directed forgetting paradigm has been extensively used to assess how subjects intentionally limit the future expression of specific memory content. In the item method, subjects are given a list of ... [more ▼]

The directed forgetting paradigm has been extensively used to assess how subjects intentionally limit the future expression of specific memory content. In the item method, subjects are given a list of words with the instruction to remember every item followed by a “remember” cue (to-be-remembered items or TBR) and to forget items followed by a “forget” cue (to-be-forgotten items or TBF). Typically, TBR items are better recalled or recognized than TBF items when subjects are subsequently tested on all presented words, regardless of study instructions. However, it is currently not clear if this directed forgetting effect is due to a selective rehearsal of TBR items or to an attentional inhibition of TBF items. In the present study, the performance of two groups of subjects that performed a directed forgetting task with or without articulatory suppression was compared. Indeed, if selective rehearsal is responsible of the directed forgetting effect, the effect should disappear when subjects are not allowed to rehearse TBR items because of the articulatory suppression instruction. Results showed an equivalent directed forgetting effect between the two groups on a recognition task. These results suggest that selective rehearsal is not the major determinant of the directed forgetting effect. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-face does not capture attention: an inattentional blindness study
Devue, Christel ULg; Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

Poster (2006)

It has been shown previously that some categories of stimuli are more likely to capture attention under condition of inattention compared to others. This is the case of faces and auto-referential material ... [more ▼]

It has been shown previously that some categories of stimuli are more likely to capture attention under condition of inattention compared to others. This is the case of faces and auto-referential material (e.g., the subject’s own name) in the inattentional blindness paradigm (Mack & Rock, 1998). However, stimuli combining these two properties have never been assessed. Yet it could be that the own face, because it is both a face and a self-referential stimulus, is more prone to attract attention compared to other faces. On the contrary, it could be that the identity and the familiarity of faces are not relevant factors because any face attracts attention by itself and all faces are equally distractive. Moreover, most of previous studies have used schematic unrealistic stimuli. Here, we tested these two opposite hypotheses in a first experiment using photographic stimuli and results showed that the own face does not attract attention compared to another highly familiar face or to an unknown face. Nevertheless, it appears that the own face was still better recognized compared to the others. A second experiment was aimed at verifying whether faces attract attention more than other objects with the same realistic photographic stimuli than used in experiment 1. Results confirmed previous findings that faces are more resistant to inattentional blindness than other objects. Our study suggests that a face by itself attracts attention compared to other objects whatever its familiarity or its identity. These results challenge the view that auto-referential material benefits from specific attentional processes. [less ▲]

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