References of "Fettweis, Xavier"
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See detailCurrent and future atmospheric circulation at 500 hPa over Greenland simulated by the CMIP3 and CMIP5 global models
Belleflamme, Alexandre ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Lang, Charlotte ULg et al

in Climate Dynamics (2013), 41(7-8),

The Greenland ice sheet is projected to be strongly affected by global warming. These projections are either issued from downscaling methods (such as Regional Climate Models) or they come directly from ... [more ▼]

The Greenland ice sheet is projected to be strongly affected by global warming. These projections are either issued from downscaling methods (such as Regional Climate Models) or they come directly from General Circulation Models (GCMs). In this context, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the daily atmospheric circulation simulated by the GCMs, since it is used as forcing for downscaling methods. Thus, we use an automatic circulation type classification based on two indices (Euclidean distance and Spearman rank correlation using the daily 500 hPa geopotential height) to evaluate the ability of the GCMs from both CMIP3 and CMIP5 databases to simulate the main circulation types over Greenland during summer. For each circulation type, the GCMs are compared to three reanalysis datasets on the basis of their frequency and persistence differences. For the current climate (1961–1990), we show that most of the GCMs do not reproduce the expected frequency and the persistence of the circulation types and that they simulate poorly the observed daily variability of the general circulation. Only a few GCMs can be used as reliable forcings for downscaling methods over Greenland. Finally, when applying the same approach to the future projections of the GCMs, no significant change in the atmospheric circulation over Greenland is detected, besides a generalised increase of the geopotential height due to a uniform warming of the atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailFuture surface mass balance contribution of the Antarctic ice-sheet to sea level rise
Agosta, Cécile ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Krinner, Gerhard et al

Scientific conference (2012, December 04)

Most of the IPCC-AR4 global circulation models predict an increase of the Antarctic Surface Mass Balance (SMB) during the 21st century that would mitigate global sea level rise. High-resolution modeling ... [more ▼]

Most of the IPCC-AR4 global circulation models predict an increase of the Antarctic Surface Mass Balance (SMB) during the 21st century that would mitigate global sea level rise. High-resolution modeling is necessary to adequately capture the Antarctic SMB, that is why we present here a downscaling method leading to 15-km SMB resolution for century time-scales over Antarctica. Our first results show that a higher resolution induce at the same time more run-off but a significantly higher mitigation of sea level rise for the next centuries. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models
Rae, J.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, G.; Edwards, T. et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2012), 6

Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), and its ... [more ▼]

Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution general circulation models (GCMs). This is the first time an intercomparison has been carried out of RCM results for Greenland climate and SMB. Output from RCM simulations for the recent past with the four RCMs is evaluated against available observations. The evaluation highlights the importance of using a detailed snow physics scheme, especially regarding the representations of albedo and meltwater refreezing. Simulations with three of the RCMs for the 21st century using SRES scenario A1B from two GCMs produce trends of between −5.5 and −1.1 Gt yr−2 in SMB (equivalent to +0.015 and +0.003 mm sea level equivalent yr−2), with trends of smaller magnitude for scenario E1, in which emissions are mitigated. Results from one of the RCMs whose present-day simulation is most realistic indicate that an annual mean near-surface air temperature increase over Greenland of ~ 2°C would be required for the mass loss to increase such that it exceeds accumulation, thereby causing the SMB to become negative, which has been suggested as a threshold beyond which the ice sheet would eventually be eliminated. [less ▲]

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See detail21st century projections of surface mass balance changes for major drainage systems of the Greenland ice sheet
Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, Xavier ULg

in Environmental Research Letters (2012), 7

Outputs from the regional climate model Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale at a spatial resolution of 25 km are used to study 21st century projected surface mass balance (SMB) over six major drainage basins ... [more ▼]

Outputs from the regional climate model Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale at a spatial resolution of 25 km are used to study 21st century projected surface mass balance (SMB) over six major drainage basins of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). The regional model is forced with the outputs of three different Earth System Models (CanESM2, NorESM1 and MIROC5) obtained when considering two greenhouse gas future scenarios with levels of CO2 equivalent of, respectively, 850 and >1370 ppm by 2100. Results indicate that the increase in runoff due to warming will exceed the increased precipitation deriving from the increase in evaporation for all basins, with the amount of net loss of mass at the surface varying spatially. Basins along the southwest and north coast are projected to have the highest sensitivity of SMB to increasing temperatures. For these basins, the global temperature anomaly corresponding to a decrease of the SMB below the 1980–99 average (when the ice sheet was near the equilibrium) ranges between +0.60 and +2.16 °C. For the basins along the northwest and northeast, these values range between +1.50 and +3.40 °C. Our results are conservative as they do not account for ice dynamics and changes in the ice sheet topography. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise buffered by meltwater storage in firn
Harper, J.; Humphrey, N.; Pfeffer, W. et al

in Nature (2012), 491

Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much ... [more ▼]

Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much of the increased surface melt is occurring in the percolation zone, a region of the accumulation area that is perennially covered by snow and firn (partly compacted snow). The fate of melt water in the percolation zone is poorly constrained: some may travel away from its point of origin and eventually influence the ice sheet’s flow dynamics and mass balance and the global sea level, whereas some may simply infiltrate into cold snow or firn and refreeze with none of these effects. Here we quantify the existing water storage capacity of the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet and show the potential for hundreds of gigatonnes of meltwater storage. We collected in situ observations of firn structure and meltwater retention along a roughly 85-kilometre-long transect of the melting accumulation area. Our data show that repeated infiltration events in which melt water penetrates deeply (more than 10 metres) eventually fill all pore space with water. As future surface melt intensifies under Arctic warming, a fraction of melt water that would otherwise contribute to sea-level rise will fill existing pore space of the percolation zone. We estimate the lower and upper bounds of this storage sink to be 322 ± 44 gigatonnes and 1.289 gigatonnes, respectively. Furthermore, we find that decades are required to fill this pore space under a range of plausible future climate conditions. Hence, routing of surface melt water into filling the pore space of the firn column will delay expansion of the area contributing to sea-level rise, although once the pore space is filled it cannot quickly be regenerated. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model
van Angelen, J.; Lenaerts, J.; Lhermitte, S. et al

in Cryosphere (2012), 6

We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The ... [more ▼]

We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6%) at the K-transect (west Greenland) for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo scheme (+22%). To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed, which has strongest impact on melt in the accumulation area. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced meltwater retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer that covers the Greenland Ice Sheet. [less ▲]

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See detailSimulating the growth of supra-glacial lakes at the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet
Leeson, A.; Shepherd, A.; Palmer, S. et al

in Cryosphere (2012), 6

We present a new method of modelling the growth of supraglacial lakes at the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet, based on routing runoff estimated by a regional climate model across a digital ... [more ▼]

We present a new method of modelling the growth of supraglacial lakes at the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet, based on routing runoff estimated by a regional climate model across a digital elevation model (DEM) of the ice sheet surface. Using data acquired during the 2003 melt season, we demonstrate that the model is 19 times more likely to correctly predict the presence (or absence) of lakes than it is to make incorrect predictions, within an elevation range of 1100 to 1700 metres above sea level (m a.s.l.), when compared with MODIS satellite imagery. Of the 66% of observed lake locations which the model correctly reproduces, the simulated lake onset day is found to be correlated with that observed with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.76. Our model accurately simulates maximum cumulative lake area with only a 1.5% overestimate. However, because our model does not simulate processes leading to lake stagnation or decay, such as refreezing or drainage, at present we do not simulate absolute daily lake area. We find that the maximum potential lake-covered ice sheet area is limited by topography to 6.4%. We estimate that this corresponds to a volume of 1.49 km3, 12% of the runoff produced in 2003. This can be taken as an upper bound given uncertainty in the DEM. This study has proved a good first step towards capturing the variability of supraglacial lake evolution with a numerical model. These initial results are promising and suggest that the model is a useful tool for use in analysing the behaviour of supraglacial lakes on the Greenland ice sheet in the present day and potentially beyond. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitivity of a Greenland ice sheet model to atmospheric forcing fields
Quiquet, A.; Punge, H.; Ritz, C. et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2012), 6

Predicting the climate for the future and how it will impact ice sheet evolution requires coupling ice sheet models with climate models. However, before we attempt to develop a realistic coupled setup, we ... [more ▼]

Predicting the climate for the future and how it will impact ice sheet evolution requires coupling ice sheet models with climate models. However, before we attempt to develop a realistic coupled setup, we propose, in this study, to first analyse the impact of a model simulated climate on an ice sheet. We undertake this exercise for a set of regional and global climate models. Modelled near surface air temperature and precipitation are provided as upper boundary conditions to the GRISLI (GRenoble Ice Shelf and Land Ice model) hybrid ice sheet model (ISM) in its Greenland configuration. After 20 kyrs of simulation, the resulting ice sheets highlight the differences between the climate models. While modelled ice sheet sizes are generally comparable to the observed one, there are considerable deviations among the ice sheets on regional scales. These deviations can be explained by biases in temperature and precipitation near the coast. This is especially true in the case of global models. But the deviations between the climate models are also due to the differences in the atmospheric general circulation. To account for these differences in the context of coupling ice sheet models with climate models, we conclude that appropriate downscaling methods will be needed. In some cases, systematic corrections of the climatic variables at the interface may be required to obtain realistic results for the Greenland ice sheet (GIS). [less ▲]

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See detailFuture projections of the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance simulated by the regional climate model MAR forced by three CMIP5 global models.
Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Franco, Bruno ULg; Lang, Charlotte ULg et al

Conference (2012, September 11)

As part of the ICE2SEA project, the regional climate model MAR was forced by the global models HadCM3 and ECHAM5 for making future projections of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) Surface Mass Balance (SMB ... [more ▼]

As part of the ICE2SEA project, the regional climate model MAR was forced by the global models HadCM3 and ECHAM5 for making future projections of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) Surface Mass Balance (SMB) over 1980-2099 at a resolution of 25km. However, the comparison with MAR forced by the ERA-40 reanalysis over 1980-1999 shows that MAR forced by these GCMs is not able to represent reliably the current SMB due to biases in the general circulation and in the free atmosphere summer temperature modelled by these GCMs around the GrIS. That is why, we present here first results of MAR forced by the next generation of GCMs from the CMIP5 data base (CanESM2, NorESM1 and MIROC5 here). The comparison with the ERA-INTERIM forced MAR simulations over current climate is a lot of better, which increases the reliability and the interest of these new MAR projections. In addition, the new scenarios (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.5) of the next IPCC Assessment Report (AR5) are used here. These new simulations show notably that the response of SMB to rising temperature is not a linear function of the temperature anomalies due to the positive albedo feedback which enhances the surface melt. For 2100, in case of extreme rising temperature (RCP 8.5 scenario), MAR simulates a surface GrIS mass loss corresponding to a cumulated sea level rise (SLR) of about 15 cm since 2000! Mainly the changes in SMB and in surface energy balance will be discussed here and estimations of the GrIS surface melt contribution to the SLR using all the CMIP5 outputs will be given. [less ▲]

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See detailSeveral years El Niño forecast using a wavelet-based mode decomposition
Nicolay, Samuel ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg

Conference (2012, September 10)

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See detailRECOURS À UNE CAMPAGNE DE MESURES TOPOCLIMATIQUES APPLIQUÉE POUR UNE ÉTUDE COMPARATIVE DE VARIABLES MÉTÉOROLOGIQUES CONCOMITANTES PROVENANT DES STATIONS MÉTÉOROLOGIQUES DE BRUGGE ET DU MONT RIGI EN BELGIQUE
Pirard, Xavier ULg; Jorion, Nicolas ULg; Doutreloup, Sébastien ULg et al

Poster (2012, September 07)

Une station météorologique automatique munie d’un mât de 10 mètres a été installée à l’Ouest de l’agglomération urbaine de Brugge (Belgique) par le Laboratoire de Climatologie et Topoclimatologie de l’ULg ... [more ▼]

Une station météorologique automatique munie d’un mât de 10 mètres a été installée à l’Ouest de l’agglomération urbaine de Brugge (Belgique) par le Laboratoire de Climatologie et Topoclimatologie de l’ULg. Elle a été équipée afin de confirmer la bonne qualité des prévisions météorologiques du modèle WRF établies dans le cadre du projet européen TWENTIES. Les données récoltées de minute en minute par cette station météorologique offrent également l’opportunité de mettre en évidence le détail de situations météorologiques bien particulières comme celles correspondant aux passages de fronts. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation des modèles climatiques régionaux MAR et WRF sur le Svalbard
Lang, Charlotte ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Erpicum, Michel ULg

Poster (2012, September)

: Il est bien connu que les zones de hautes latitudes sont très sensibles aux changements climatiques. A cause du réchauffement global, la fonte des calottes a augmenté, ce qui à son tour a une influence ... [more ▼]

: Il est bien connu que les zones de hautes latitudes sont très sensibles aux changements climatiques. A cause du réchauffement global, la fonte des calottes a augmenté, ce qui à son tour a une influence sur le climat via des modifications de la circulation thermohaline, la rétroaction de l’albédo de la glace, l’augmentation du niveau des mers… Nous avons comparé le climat du Svalbard modélisé par deux modèles régionaux (MAR et WRF) à une résolution de 10 km sur la période 2000-2010 à des mesures provenant de plusieurs stations météorologiques localisées dans différentes régions de l’archipel afin d'évaluer lequel de ces modèles pouvait représenter au mieux le climat du Svalbard. [less ▲]

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See detailÉVOLUTION DU COMPORTEMENT DU VENT ET DE SON POTENTIEL POUR LA PRODUCTION D'ÉNERGIE ÉOLIENNE DURANT LES 30 DERNIÈRES ANNÉES : LE CAS DE LA BELGIQUE
Doutreloup, Sébastien ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Erpicum, Michel ULg

in Bigot, Sylvain; Rome, Sandra (Eds.) Les climats régionaux : observation et modélisation. (Actes du colloque organisé à Grenoble du mercredi 5 au samedi 8 septembre 2012) (2012, September)

Chaque année, le nombre d'éoliennes dans le monde augmente de façon significative suite notamment aux politiques encourageant les productions d'énergie verte afin d’atténuer le réchauffement climatique ... [more ▼]

Chaque année, le nombre d'éoliennes dans le monde augmente de façon significative suite notamment aux politiques encourageant les productions d'énergie verte afin d’atténuer le réchauffement climatique. Toutefois, ce type d'énergie est tributaire de la météo. Cela implique que la production d'énergie éolienne est irrégulière à courte échelle de temps. Cependant, la disponibilité d’électricité de courtes périodes de temps est très importante à connaitre pour les producteurs d'énergie ainsi que pour les gestionnaires de réseaux. Pour ces raisons, il nous parait primordial d’analyser l’évolution de l’intermittence de la vitesse du vent sur les 30 dernières années (1979-2009). Pour ce faire nous utilisons le modèle WRF forcé par les réanalyses ERA-Interim, les réanalyses NCEP2 et certains modèles du GIEC (base de données CMIP5). [less ▲]

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See detailLes modèles globaux projettent-ils plus de blocages anticycloniques en Europe pour le futur ?
Belleflamme, Alexandre ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Erpicum, Michel ULg

in Bigot, Sylvain; Rome, Sandra (Eds.) XXVème colloque de l'Association Internationale de Climatologie - Les climats régionaux : observation et modélisation (2012, September)

The IPCC projects more frequent and longer heat waves and droughts during summer for future over Western Europe. These extreme events occur during anticyclonic blocking events. We use atmospheric ... [more ▼]

The IPCC projects more frequent and longer heat waves and droughts during summer for future over Western Europe. These extreme events occur during anticyclonic blocking events. We use atmospheric circulation type classifications to determine if the models project an increase of the number and the persistence of these anticyclonic blockings. For recent climate, the number of blocking events depends on the ability of the models to reproduce the observed general circulation. The future projections do not show any systematic evolution of the number of anticyclonic blockings over Western Europe. Nevertheless, other changes like an increase of the temperature will lead to more frequent heat waves and droughts. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland climate change: from the past to the future
Masson‐Delmotte, Valérie; Swingedouw, Didier; Landais, Amaëlle et al

in Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. RNA (2012), 3(5), 427-449

Climate archives available from deep sea and marine shelf sediments, glaciers, lakes, and ice cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet dynamics ... [more ▼]

Climate archives available from deep sea and marine shelf sediments, glaciers, lakes, and ice cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet dynamics, and land surface changes in a broader perspective. We show that, during the last decade (2000s), atmospheric and sea surface temperatures are reaching levels last encountered millennia ago, when northern high latitude summer insolation was higher due to a different orbital configuration. Records from lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during the last 10,000 years, highlighting the role of soil dynamics in past vegetation changes, and stressing the growing anthropogenic impacts on soil erosion during the recent decades. Furthermore, past and present changes in atmospheric and oceanic heat advection appear to strongly influence both regional climate and ice sheet dynamics. Projections from climate models are investigated to quantify the magnitude and rates of future changes in Greenland temperature, which may be faster than past abrupt events occurring under interglacial conditions. Within one century, in response to increasing greenhouse gas emissions, Greenland may reach temperatures last time encountered during the last interglacial period, approximately 125,000 years ago. We review and discuss whether analogies between the last interglacial and future changes are reasonable, because of the different seasonal impacts of orbital and greenhouse gas forcings. Over several decades to centuries, future Greenland melt may act as a negative feedback, limiting regional warming albeit with global sea level and climatic impacts. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland ice sheet albedo feedback: thermodynamics and atmospheric drivers
Box, J.; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Stroeve, J. et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2012), 6

In this study, snowpack scenarios are modelled across the French Alps using dynamically downscaled variables from the ALADIN Regional Climate Model (RCM) for the control period (1961–1990) and three ... [more ▼]

In this study, snowpack scenarios are modelled across the French Alps using dynamically downscaled variables from the ALADIN Regional Climate Model (RCM) for the control period (1961–1990) and three emission scenarios (SRES B1, A1B and A2) for the mid- and late 21st century (2021–2050 and 2071–2100). These variables are statistically adapted to the different elevations, aspects and slopes of the Alpine massifs. For this purpose, we use a simple analogue criterion with ERA40 series as well as an existing detailed climatology of the French Alps (Durand et al., 2009a) that provides complete meteorological fields from the SAFRAN analysis model. The resulting scenarios of precipitation, temperature, wind, cloudiness, longwave and shortwave radiation, and humidity are used to run the physical snow model CROCUS and simulate snowpack evolution over the massifs studied. The seasonal and regional characteristics of the simulated climate and snow cover changes are explored, as is the influence of the scenarios on these changes. Preliminary results suggest that the snow water equivalent (SWE) of the snowpack will decrease dramatically in the next century, especially in the Southern and Extreme Southern parts of the Alps. This decrease seems to result primarily from a general warming throughout the year, and possibly a deficit of precipitation in the autumn. The magnitude of the snow cover decline follows a marked altitudinal gradient, with the highest altitudes being less exposed to climate change. Scenario A2, with its high concentrations of greenhouse gases, results in a SWE reduction roughly twice as large as in the low-emission scenario B1 by the end of the century. This study needs to be completed using simulations from other RCMs, since a multi-model approach is essential for uncertainty analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailRefreezing on the Greenland ice sheet: a comparison of parameterizations
Reijmer, C.; van den Broeke, M.; Fettweis, Xavier ULg et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2012), 6

Retention and refreezing of meltwater are acknowledged to be important processes for the mass budget of polar glaciers and ice sheets. Several parameterizations of these processes exist for use in energy ... [more ▼]

Retention and refreezing of meltwater are acknowledged to be important processes for the mass budget of polar glaciers and ice sheets. Several parameterizations of these processes exist for use in energy and mass balance models. Due to a lack of direct observations, validation of these parameterizations is difficult. In this study we compare a set of 6 refreezing parameterizations against output of two Regional Climate Models (RCMs) coupled to an energy balance snow model, the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2) and the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR), applied to the Greenland ice sheet. In both RCMs, refreezing is explicitly calculated in a snow model that calculates vertical profiles of temperature, density and liquid water content. Between RACMO2 and MAR, the ice sheet-integrated amount of refreezing differs by only 4.9 mm w.e yr−1 (4.5 %), and the temporal and spatial variability are very similar. For consistency, the parameterizations are forced with output (surface temperature, precipitation and melt) of the RCMs. For the ice sheet-integrated amount of refreezing and its inter-annual variations, all parameterizations give similar results, especially after some tuning. However, the spatial distributions differ significantly and the spatial correspondence between the RCMs is better than with any of the parameterizations. Results are especially sensitive to the choice of the depth of the thermally active layer, which determines the cold content of the snow in most parameterizations. These results are independent of which RCM is used to force the parameterizations. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of spatial resolution on the modelling of the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance between 1990–2010, using the regional climate model MAR
Franco, Bruno ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Lang, Charlotte et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2012), 6

With the aim to force an ice dynamical model, the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) was modelled at different spatial resolutions (15-50 km) for the period 1990-2010, using the ... [more ▼]

With the aim to force an ice dynamical model, the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) was modelled at different spatial resolutions (15-50 km) for the period 1990-2010, using the regional climate model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) forced by the ERA-INTERIM reanalysis. This comparison revealed that (i) the inter-annual variability of the SMB components is consistent within the different spatial resolutions investigated, (ii) the MAR model simulates heavier precipitation on average over the GrIS with diminishing spatial resolution, and (iii) the SMB components (except precipitation) can be derived from a simulation at lower resolution with an intelligent interpolation. This interpolation can also be used to approximate the SMB components over another topography/ice sheet mask of the GrIS. These results are important for the forcing of an ice dynamical model, needed to enable future projections of the GrIS contribution to sea level rise over the coming centuries. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the MAR and WRF regional climate models over Svalbard
Lang, Charlotte ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Doutreloup, Sébastien ULg et al

Conference (2012, June 01)

It is well known that high latitude zones are very sensitive to climate change. As a result of global warming, ice sheet melting has increased which in turn has an influence on climate through ... [more ▼]

It is well known that high latitude zones are very sensitive to climate change. As a result of global warming, ice sheet melting has increased which in turn has an influence on climate through modifications of the thermohaline circulation, feedback of ice albedo, sea level rise... Svalbard is an archipelago between 74 and 81°lat N and 60 percent of its area (62 248 km2) is covered with glaciers and ice sheets. The impact of global warming on the Svalbard cryosphere can be estimated with climate models. However, we need to use regional climate models as they offer the possibility of a higher resolution than general circulation models. We have ran two regional climate models (MAR and WRF) at a 10-kilometre resolution between 2006 and 2010 over Svalbard and compared their simulated climate to near surface measurements at several weather stations through the archipelago in order to determine which one of them could best represent the Svalbard climate. [less ▲]

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