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See detailCold-adapted enzymes from marine antarctic microorganisms
Marx, J. C.; Collins, T.; D'Amico, Salvino ULg et al

in Marine Biotechnology (2007), 9(3, May-Jun), 293-304

The Antarctic marine environment is characterized by challenging conditions for the survival of native microorganisms. Indeed, next to the temperature effect represented by the Arrhenius law, the ... [more ▼]

The Antarctic marine environment is characterized by challenging conditions for the survival of native microorganisms. Indeed, next to the temperature effect represented by the Arrhenius law, the viscosity of the medium, which is also significantly enhanced by low temperatures, contributes to slow down reaction rates. This review analyses the different challenges and focuses on a key element of life at low temperatures: cold-adapted enzymes. The molecular characteristics of these enzymes are discussed as well as the adaptation strategies which can be inferred from the comparison of their properties and three-dimensional structures with those of their mesophilic counterparts. As these enzymes display a high specific activity at low and moderate temperatures associated with a relatively high thermosensitivity, the interest in these properties is discussed with regard to their current and possible applications in biotechnology. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of lysine versus arginine in enzyme cold-adaptation: Modifying lysine to homo-arginine stabilizes the cold-adapted alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteramonas haloplanktis
Siddiqui, K. S.; Poljak, A.; Guilhaus, M. et al

in Proteins-Structure Function and Bioinformatics (2006), 64(2), 486-501

The cold-adapted alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (AHA) is a multidomain enzyme capable of reversible unfolding. Cold-adapted proteins, including AHA, have been predicted to be ... [more ▼]

The cold-adapted alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (AHA) is a multidomain enzyme capable of reversible unfolding. Cold-adapted proteins, including AHA, have been predicted to be structurally flexible and conformationally unstable as a consequence of a high lysine-to-arginine ratio. In order to examine the role of low arginine content in structural flexibility of AHA, the amino groups of lysine were guanidinated to form homoarginine (hR), and the structure-function-stability properties of the modified enzyme were analyzed by transverse urea gradient-gel electrophoresis. The extent of modification was monitored by MALDI-TOF-MS, and correlated to changes in activity and stability. Modifying lysine to hR produced a conformationally more stable and less active a-amylase. The k(cat) of the modified enzyme decreased with a concomitant increase in Delta H-# and decrease in K-m. To interpret the structural basis of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties, the hR residues were modeled in the AHA X-ray structure and compared to the X-ray structure of a thermostable homolog. The experimental properties of the modified AHA were consistent with K106hR forming an intra-Domain B salt bridge to stabilize the active site and decrease the cooperativity of unfolding. Homo-Arg modification also appeared to alter Ca2+ and Cl- binding in the active site. Our results indicate that replacing lysine with hR generates mesophilic-like characteristics in AHA, and provides support for the importance of lysine residues in promoting enzyme cold adaptation. These data were consistent with computational analyses that show that AHA possesses a compositional bias that favors decreased conformational stability and increased flexibility. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics and energetics of ligand binding determined by microcalorimetry: Insights into active site mobility in a psychrophilic alpha-amylase
D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Sohier, Jean ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2006), 358(5), 1296-1304

A new microcalorimetric method for recording the kinetic parameters k(cat)/K-m and K-i of alpha-amylases using polysaccharides and oligosaccharides as substrates is described. This method is based on the ... [more ▼]

A new microcalorimetric method for recording the kinetic parameters k(cat)/K-m and K-i of alpha-amylases using polysaccharides and oligosaccharides as substrates is described. This method is based on the heat released by glycosidic bond hydrolysis. The method has been developed to study the active site properties of the cold-active alpha-amylase produced by an Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium in comparison with its closest structural homolog from pig pancreas. It is shown that the psychrophilic a-amylase is more active on large macromolecular substrates and that the higher rate constants k(cat) are gained at the expense of a lower affinity for the substrate. The active site is able to accommodate larger inhibitory complexes, resulting in a mixed-type inhibition of starch hydrolysis by maltose. A method for recording the binding enthalpies by isothermal titration calorimetry in a low-affinity system has been developed, allowing analysis of the energetics of weak ligand binding using the allosteric activator chloride. It is shown that the low affinity of the psychrophilic a-amylase for chloride is entropically driven. The high enthalpic and entropic contributions of activator binding suggest large structural fluctuations between the free and the bound states of the cold-active enzyme. The kinetic and thermodynamic data for the psychrophilic a-amylase indicate that the strictly conserved side-chains involved in substrate binding and catalysis possess an improved mobility, responsible for activity in the cold, and resulting from the disappearance of stabilizing interactions far from the active site. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA nondetergent sulfobetaine prevents protein aggregation in microcalorimetric studies
Collins, T.; D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Georlette, D. et al

in Analytical Biochemistry (2006), 352(2), 299-301

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See detailOligosaccharide binding in family 8 glycosidases: Crystal structures of active-site mutants of the beta-1,4-xylanase pXyl from Pseudoaltermonas haloplanktis TAH3a in complex with substrate and product
De Vos, D.; Collins, T.; Nerinckx, W. et al

in Biochemistry (2006), 45(15), 4797-4807

The structures of inactive mutants D144A and E78Q of the glycoside hydrolase family 8 (GH-8) endo-beta-1,4-D-Xylanase (pXyl) from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAH3a in complex ... [more ▼]

The structures of inactive mutants D144A and E78Q of the glycoside hydrolase family 8 (GH-8) endo-beta-1,4-D-Xylanase (pXyl) from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAH3a in complex with its substrate xylopentaose (at 1.95 angstrom resolution) and product xylotriose (at 1.9 angstrom resolution) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. A detailed comparative analysis of these with the apoenzyme and with other GH-8 structures indicates an induced fit mechanism upon ligand binding whereby a number of conformational changes and, in particular, a repositioning of the proton donor into a more catalytically competent position Occurs. This has also allowed for the description of protein-ligand interactions in this enzyme and for the demarcation of subsites -3 to +3. An in-depth analysis of each of these subsites gives an insight into the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and the basis of xylose/glucose discrimination in family 8 glycoside hydrolases. Furthermore, the structure of the -1/+1 subsite spanning complex reveals that the substrate is distorted from its ground state conformation. Indeed, structural analysis and in silico docking Studies indicate that substrate hydrolysis in GH-8 members is preceded by a conformational change, away from the substrate ground-state chair conformation, to a pretransition state local minimum S-2(O) conformation. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychrophilic microorganisms: challenges for life
D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Collins, T.; Marx, J. C. et al

in EMBO Reports (2006), 7(4), 385-389

The ability of psychrophiles to survive and proliferate at low temperatures implies that they have overcome key barriers inherent to permanently cold environments. These challenges include: reduced enzyme ... [more ▼]

The ability of psychrophiles to survive and proliferate at low temperatures implies that they have overcome key barriers inherent to permanently cold environments. These challenges include: reduced enzyme activity; decreased membrane fluidity; altered transport of nutrients and waste products; decreased rates of transcription, translation and cell division; protein cold- denaturation; inappropriate protein folding; and intracellular ice formation. Cold- adapted organisms have successfully evolved features, genotypic and/ or phenotypic, to surmount the negative effects of low temperatures and to enable growth in these extreme environments. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of these adaptations as gained from extensive biochemical and biophysical studies and also from genomics and proteomics. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of glycoside hydrolase family 8 xylanases in baking
Collins, T.; Hoyoux, A.; Dutron, A. et al

in Journal of Cereal Science (2006), 43(1), 79-84

Xylanases have long been used in the baking industry for improving dough stability and flexibility and for increasing bread volume and crumb structure. Only xylanases from glycoside hydrolase families 10 ... [more ▼]

Xylanases have long been used in the baking industry for improving dough stability and flexibility and for increasing bread volume and crumb structure. Only xylanases from glycoside hydrolase families 10 and I I appear to have been tested in this application and only those from the latter family have as yet found application. Interestingly, enzymes with a putative xylanase activity are also found in glycoside hydrolase families 5, 7, 8 and 43, but apparently these have not, as yet, been tested in baking. Baking trials were used to determine the effectiveness of a psychrophilic and a mesophilic family 8 xylanolytic enzyme as well as a psychrophilic family 10 xylanase and a currently used family 11 commercial mesophilic xylanase. The potential of family 8 xylanases as technological aids in baking was clearly demonstrated as both the psychrophilic enzyme from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAH3a and the mesophilic enzyme from Bacillus halodurans C-125 had a positive effect on loaf volume. In contrast, the psychrophilic family 10 enzyme from Cryptococcus adeliae TAE85 was found to be ineffective. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel family 8 psychrophilic xylanase: fundamentals and applications.
Collins, Tony; Gerday, Charles ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

Poster (2006)

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See detailBiocatalysis at low temperatures: a challenge for life.
Feller, Georges ULg

Conference (2006)

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See detailProteomics of marine microorganisms
Voigt, B.; Hieu, C.X.; Wilmes, B. et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailSurvival in the cold: proteome analysis of the psychrophilic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125
Wilmes, B.; Glagla, S.; Albrecht, D. et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures.
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailAnalysis of Ser-His-Glu triad in alpha-amylases
Marx, Jean Claude; Feller, Georges ULg

Poster (2006)

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures
Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailFundamentals and biotechnological aspects of cold-adapted enzymes
Gerday, Charles ULg; Collins, Tony; D'Amico, Salvino et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailAnalysis of Ser-His-Glu triad in alpha-amylases
Marx, Jean Claude; Feller, Georges ULg

Poster (2006)

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See detailCold-adapted xylanases: from Antarctica to the table.
Collins, Tony; Georis, Jacques; Dauvrin, Thierry et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailProtein folding is a rate limiting step for bacterial growth at low temperatures
D'Amico, Salvino; Piette, Florence; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailOutils de biorestauration des sols sub-antarctiques exposés aux hydrocarbures pétroliers
Delille, D.; Pelletier, E.; Coulon, F. et al

in carn (2006), 21

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See detailStability domains, substrate-induced conformational changes, and hinge-bending motions in a psychrophilic phosphoglycerate kinase: A microcalorimetric study
Zecchinon, Laurent ULg; Oriol, A.; Netzel, U. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2005), 280(50), 41307-41314

The cold-active phosphoglycerate kinase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. TACII18 exhibits two distinct stability domains in the free, open conformation. It is shown that these stability ... [more ▼]

The cold-active phosphoglycerate kinase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. TACII18 exhibits two distinct stability domains in the free, open conformation. It is shown that these stability domains do not match the structural N- and C-domains as the heat-stable domain corresponds to about 80 residues of the C-domain, including the nucleotide binding site, whereas the remaining of the protein contributes to the main heat-labile domain. This was demonstrated by spectroscopic and microcalorimetric analyses of the native enzyme, of its mutants, and of the isolated recombinant structural domains. It is proposed that the heat-stable domain provides a compact structure improving the binding affinity of the nucleotide, therefore increasing the catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. Upon substrate binding, the enzyme adopts a uniformly more stable closed conformation. Substrate-induced stability changes suggest that the free energy of ligand binding is converted into an increased conformational stability used to drive the hinge-bending motions and domain closure. [less ▲]

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