References of "Feller, Georges"
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See detailA perspective on cold enzymes: Current knowledge and frequently asked questions
Marx, J. C.; Blaise, Vinciane ULg; Collins, T. et al

in Cellular and Molecular Biology (2004), 50(5), 643-655

Studies on psychrophilic enzymes to determine the structural features important for cold-activity have attracted increased attention in the last few years. This enhanced interest is due to the attractive ... [more ▼]

Studies on psychrophilic enzymes to determine the structural features important for cold-activity have attracted increased attention in the last few years. This enhanced interest is due to the attractive properties of such proteins, i.e. a high specific activity and a low thermal stability, and thus, these enzymes constitute a tremendous potential for fundamental research and biotechnological applications. This review examines the impact of low temperatures on life, the diversity of adaptation to counteract these effects and gives an overview of the features proposed to account for low thermal stability and cold-activity, following the chronological order of the catalytic cycle phases. Moreover, we present an overview of recent techniques used in the analysis of the flexibility of a protein structure which is an important concept in cold-adaptation; an overview of biotechnological potential of psychrophilic enzymes and finally, a few frequently asked questions about cold-adaptation and their possible answers. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of family 8 enzymes with xylanolytic activity in baking
Dutron, Agnes; Georis, Jacques; Genot, Bernard et al

Patent (2004)

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See detailAdenylation-dependent conformation and unfolding pathways of the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from the thermophile Thermus scotoductus
Georlette, D.; Blaise, Vinciane ULg; Bouillenne, Fabrice ULg et al

in Biophysical Journal (2004), 86(2), 1089-1104

In the last few years, an increased attention has been focused on NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases. This is mostly due to their potential use as antibiotic targets, because effective inhibition of these ... [more ▼]

In the last few years, an increased attention has been focused on NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases. This is mostly due to their potential use as antibiotic targets, because effective inhibition of these essential enzymes would result in the death of the bacterium. However, development of an efficient drug requires that the conformational modifications involved in the catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases are understood. From this perspective, we have investigated the conformational changes occurring in the thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD(+)-DNA ligase upon adenylation, as well as the effect of cofactor binding on protein resistance to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results indicate that cofactor binding induces conformational rearrangement within the active site and promotes a compaction of the enzyme. These data support an induced "open-closure" process upon adenylation, leading to the formation of the catalytically active enzyme that is able to bind DNA. These conformational changes are likely to be associated with the protein function, preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes between deadenylated ligases and DNA. In addition, enzyme adenylation significantly increases resistance of the protein to thermal denaturation and GdmCl-induced unfolding, establishing a thermodynamic link between ligand binding and increased conformational stability. Finally, chemical unfolding of deadenylated and adenylated enzyme is accompanied by accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and premolten globule states. Maximal populations of these intermediates are shifted toward higher GdmCl concentrations in the case of the adenylated ligase. These data provide further insights into the properties of partially folded intermediates. [less ▲]

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See detailSome like it cold: biocatalysis at low temperatures
Georlette, D.; Blaise, Vinciane ULg; Collins, T. et al

in FEMS Microbiology Reviews (2004), 28(1), 25-42

In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on a class of organisms called psychrophiles. These organisms, hosts of permanently cold habitats, often display metabolic fluxes more or less ... [more ▼]

In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on a class of organisms called psychrophiles. These organisms, hosts of permanently cold habitats, often display metabolic fluxes more or less comparable to those exhibited by mesophilic organisms at moderate temperatures. Psychrophiles have evolved by producing, among other peculiarities, "cold-adapted" enzymes which have the properties to cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures. Thermal compensation in these enzymes is reached, in most cases, through a high catalytic efficiency associated, however, with a low thermal stability. Thanks to recent advances provided by X-ray crystallography, structure modelling, protein engineering and biophysical studies, the adaptation strategies are beginning to be understood. The emerging picture suggests that psychrophilic enzymes are characterized by an improved flexibility of the structural components involved in the catalytic cycle, whereas other protein regions, if not implicated in catalysis, may be even more rigid than their mesophilic counterparts. Due to their attractive properties, i.e., a high specific activity and a low thermal stability, these enzymes constitute a tremendous potential for fundamental research and biotechnological applications. (C) 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular basis of the amylose-like polymer formation catalyzed by Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase
Albenne, C.; Skov, L. K.; Mirza, O. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(1), 726-734

Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a remarkable transglucosidase from family 13 of the glycosidehydrolases that synthesizes an insoluble amylose-like polymer from sucrose in the absence of any ... [more ▼]

Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a remarkable transglucosidase from family 13 of the glycosidehydrolases that synthesizes an insoluble amylose-like polymer from sucrose in the absence of any primer. Amylosucrase shares strong structural similarities with alpha-amylases. Exactly how this enzyme catalyzes the formation of alpha-1,4-glucan and which structural features are involved in this unique functionality existing in family 13 are important questions still not fully answered. Here, we provide evidence that amylosucrase initializes polymer formation by releasing, through sucrose hydrolysis, a glucose molecule that is subsequently used as the first acceptor molecule. Maltooligosaccharides of increasing size were produced and successively elongated at their nonreducing ends until they reached a critical size and concentration, causing precipitation. The ability of amylosucrase to bind and to elongate maltooligosaccharides is notably due to the presence of key residues at the OB1 acceptor binding site that contribute strongly to the guidance ( Arg(415), subsite +4) and the correct positioning (Asp(394) and Arg(446), subsite +1) of acceptor molecules. On the other hand, Arg(226) (subsites +2/+3) limits the binding of maltooligosaccharides, resulting in the accumulation of small products (G to G3) in the medium. A remarkable mutant (R226A), activated by the products it forms, was generated. It yields twice as much insoluble glucan as the wild-type enzyme and leads to the production of lower quantities of by-products. [less ▲]

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See detailHorizontal gene transfer from Eukarya to Bacteria and domain shuffling: the alpha-amylase model
Da Lage, J. L.; Feller, Georges ULg; Janecek, S.

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2004), 61(1), 97-109

alpha-Amylases are present in all kingdoms of the living world. Despite strong conservation of the tertiary structure, only a few amino acids are conserved in interkingdom comparisons. Animal alpha ... [more ▼]

alpha-Amylases are present in all kingdoms of the living world. Despite strong conservation of the tertiary structure, only a few amino acids are conserved in interkingdom comparisons. Animal alpha-amylases are characterized by several typical motifs and biochemical properties. A few cases of such alpha-amylases have been previously reported in some eubacterial species. We screened the bacterial genomes available in the sequence databases for new occurrences of animal-like alpha-amylases. Three novel cases were found, which belong to unrelated bacterial phyla: Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Microbulbifer degradans, and Thermobifida fusca. All the animal-like alpha-amylases in Bacteria probably result from repeated horizontal gene transfer from animals. The M. degradans genome also contains bacterial-type and plant-type alpha-amylases in addition to the animal-type one. Thus, this species exhibits alpha-amylases of animal, plant, and bacterial origins. Moreover, the similarities in the extra C-terminal domains (different from both the alpha-amylase domain C and the starch-binding domain), when present, also suggest interkingdom as well as intragenomic shuffling. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel family 8 psychrophilic xylanase: fundamentals and applications
Collins, Tony; Gerday, Charles ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

Poster (2004)

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See detailActivity-stability relationships in extremophilic enzymes
D'Amico, Salvino; Collins, Tony; Georlette, Daphné et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailStructural adaptations of psychrophilic enzymes
Gerday, Charles ULg; D'Amico, Salvino; Collins, Tony et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailThe influence of temperature on bacterial assemblages during bioremediation of a diesel fuel contaminated subAntarctic soil
Delille, Daniel; Pelletier, E.; Coulon, F. et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailActivity-stability relationships in extremophilic enzymes
D'Amico, Salvino; Collins, Tony; Marx, Jean Claude et al

Poster (2004)

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See detailCofactor binding modulates the conformational stabilities and unfolding patterns of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Thermus scotoductus
Georlette, D.; Blaise, Vinciane ULg; Dohmen, C. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(50), 49945-49953

DNA ligases are important enzymes required for cellular processes such as DNA replication, recombination, and repair. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases are essentially restricted to eubacteria, thus ... [more ▼]

DNA ligases are important enzymes required for cellular processes such as DNA replication, recombination, and repair. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases are essentially restricted to eubacteria, thus constituting an attractive target in the development of novel antibiotics. Although such a project might involve the systematic testing of a vast number of chemical compounds, it can essentially gain from the preliminary deciphering of the conformational stability and structural perturbations associated with the formation of the catalytically active adenylated enzyme. We have, therefore, investigated the adenylation-induced conformational changes in the mesophilic Escherichia coli and thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD(+)-DNA ligases, and the resistance of these enzymes to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results clearly demonstrate that anchoring of the cofactor induces a conformational rearrangement within the active site of both mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes accompanied by their partial compaction. Furthermore, the adenylation of enzymes increases their resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, establishing a thermodynamic link between cofactor binding and conformational stability enhancement. Finally, guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases is shown to be a complex process that involves accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and its precursor. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychrophilic enzymes: Hot topics in cold adaptation
Feller, Georges ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg

in Nature Reviews Microbiology (2003), 1(3), 200-208

More than three-quarters of the Earth's surface is occupied by cold ecosystems, including the ocean depths, and polar and alpine regions. These permanently cold environments have been successfully ... [more ▼]

More than three-quarters of the Earth's surface is occupied by cold ecosystems, including the ocean depths, and polar and alpine regions. These permanently cold environments have been successfully colonized by a class of extremophilic microorganisms that are known as psychrophiles (which literally means cold-loving). The ability to thrive at temperatures that are close to, or below, the freezing point of water requires a vast array of adaptations to maintain the metabolic rates and sustained growth compatible with life in these severe environmental conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailTemperature adaptation of proteins: Engineering mesophilic-like activity and stability in a cold-adapted alpha-amylase
D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2003), 332(5), 981-988

Two multiple mutants of a psychrophilic alpha-amylase were produced, bearing five mutations (each introducing additional weak interactions found in pig pancreatic (alpha-amylase) with or without an extra ... [more ▼]

Two multiple mutants of a psychrophilic alpha-amylase were produced, bearing five mutations (each introducing additional weak interactions found in pig pancreatic (alpha-amylase) with or without an extra disulfide bond specific to warm-blooded animals. Both multiple mutants display large modifications of stability and activity arising from synergic effects in comparison with single mutations. Newly introduced weak interactions and the disulfide bond confer mesophilic-like stability parameters, as shown by increases in the melting point t(m), in the calorimetric enthalpy DeltaH(cal) and in protection against heat inactivation, as well as by decreases in cooperativity and reversibility of unfolding. In addition, both kinetic and thermodynamic activation parameters of the catalyzed reaction are shifted close to the values of the porcine enzyme. This study confirms the central role of weak interactions in regulating the balance between stability and activity of an enzyme in order to adapt to the environmental temperature. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural and functional adaptations to extreme temperatures in psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic DNA ligases
Georlette, D.; Damien, B.; Blaise, Vinciane ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(39), 37015-37023

Psychrophiles, host of permanently cold habitats, display metabolic fluxes comparable to those exhibited by mesophilic organisms at moderate temperatures. These organisms have evolved by producing, among ... [more ▼]

Psychrophiles, host of permanently cold habitats, display metabolic fluxes comparable to those exhibited by mesophilic organisms at moderate temperatures. These organisms have evolved by producing, among other peculiarities, cold-active enzymes that have the properties to cope with the reduction of chemical reaction rates induced by low temperatures. The emerging picture suggests that these enzymes display a high catalytic efficiency at low temperatures through an improved flexibility of the structural components involved in the catalytic cycle, whereas other protein regions, if not implicated in catalysis, may be even more rigid than their mesophilic counterparts. In return, the increased flexibility leads to a decreased stability of psychrophilic enzymes. In order to gain further advances in the analysis of the activity/flexibility/stability concept, psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic DNA ligases have been compared by three-dimensional-modeling studies, as well as regards their activity, surface hydrophobicity, structural permeability, conformational stabilities, and irreversible thermal unfolding. These data show that the cold-adapted DNA ligase is characterized by an increased activity at low and moderate temperatures, an overall destabilization of the molecular edifice, especially at the active site, and a high conformational flexibility. The opposite trend is observed in the mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, the latter being characterized by a reduced low temperature activity, high stability and reduced flexibility. These results strongly suggest a complex relationship between activity, flexibility and stability. In addition, they also indicate that in cold-adapted enzymes, the driving force for denaturation is a large entropy change. [less ▲]

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See detailMoritella cold-active dihydrofolate reductase: Are there natural limits to optimization of catalytic efficiency at low temperature?
Xu, Y.; Feller, Georges ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg et al

in Journal of Bacteriology (2003), 185(18), 5519-5526

Adapting metabolic enzymes of microorganisms to low temperature environments may require a difficult compromise between velocity and affinity. We have investigated catalytic efficiency in a key metabolic ... [more ▼]

Adapting metabolic enzymes of microorganisms to low temperature environments may require a difficult compromise between velocity and affinity. We have investigated catalytic efficiency in a key metabolic enzyme (dihydrofolate reductase) of Moritella profunda sp. nov., a strictly psychrophilic bacterium with a maximal growth rate at 2degreesC or less. The enzyme is monomeric (M-r = 18,291), 55% identical to its Escherichia coli counterpart, and displays T-m and denaturation enthalpy changes much lower than E. coli and Thermotoga maritima homologues. Its stability curve indicates a maximum stability above the temperature range of the organism, and predicts cold denaturation below 0degreesC. At mesophilic temperatures the apparent K-m value for dihydrofolate is 50- to 80-fold higher than for E. coli, Lactobacillus casei, and T. maritima dihydrofolate reductases, whereas the apparent K-m value for NADPH, though higher, remains in the same order of magnitude. At 5degreesC these values are not significantly modified. The enzyme is also much less sensitive than its E. coli counterpart to the inhibitors methotrexate and trimethoprim. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K-m) with respect to dihydrofolate is thus much lower than in the other three bacteria. The higher affinity for NADPH could have been maintained by selection since NADPH assists the release of the product tetrahydrofolate. Dihydrofolate reductase adaptation to low temperature thus appears to have entailed a pronounced trade-off between affinity and catalytic velocity. The kinetic features of this psychrophilic protein suggest that enzyme adaptation to low temperature may be constrained by natural limits to optimization of catalytic efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailThe precursor of a psychrophilic alpha-amylase: structural characterization and insights into cold adaptation
Claverie, P.; Vigano, C.; Ruysschaert, J. M. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Proteins and Proteomics (2003), 1649(2), 119-122

The alpha-amylase precursor from the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis possesses a propeptide at the C-terminus possibly responsible for outer membrane translocation. Unlike the predicted beta ... [more ▼]

The alpha-amylase precursor from the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis possesses a propeptide at the C-terminus possibly responsible for outer membrane translocation. Unlike the predicted beta-barrel of autotransporters, this C-terminal propeptide displays a noticeable alpha-helix content. It is connected to the enzyme by a disordered linker and has no significant interaction with the catalytic domain. The microcalorimetric pattern of the precursor also demonstrates that the stability of protein domains may evolve differently. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCold adaptation of a psychrophilic chitinase: a mutagenesis study
Mavromatis, K.; Feller, Georges ULg; Kokkinidis, M. et al

in Protein Engineering (2003), 16(7), 497-503

The gene encoding chitinase ArChiB from the Antarctic Arthrobacter sp. TAD20 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme purified to homogeneity. In an effort to engineer cold ... [more ▼]

The gene encoding chitinase ArChiB from the Antarctic Arthrobacter sp. TAD20 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme purified to homogeneity. In an effort to engineer cold-adapted biocatalysts through rational redesign to operate at elevated temperatures, we performed several mutations aiming to increase the rigidity of the molecular edifice of the selected psychrophilic chitinase. The mutations were designed on the basis of a homology-based three-dimensional model of the enzyme, and included an attempt to introduce a salt bridge (mutant N198K) and replacements of selected Gly residues by either Pro (mutants G93P, G254P) or Gln (G406Q). Mutant N198K resulted in a more stable protein (DeltaT(m)=0.6degreesC). Mutant G93P exhibited a DeltaT(m) of 1.2degreesC, while mutants G254P and G406Q exhibited decreased stability. We conclude that the effect of mutating Gly residues on enzyme stability is rather complex and can only be understood in the context of the structural environment. Kinetic and spectroscopic analysis of these enzyme variants revealed that the kinetic parameters k(cat) and K-m have been significantly modified. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a psychrophilic cellulase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis
Violot, S.; Haser, R.; Sonan, G. et al

in Acta Crystallographica Section D-Biological Crystallography (2003), 59(Part 7), 1256-1258

The Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis produces a cold-active cellulase. To date, a three-dimensional structure of a psychrophilic cellulase has been lacking. Crystallographic studies ... [more ▼]

The Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis produces a cold-active cellulase. To date, a three-dimensional structure of a psychrophilic cellulase has been lacking. Crystallographic studies of this cold-adapted enzyme have therefore been initiated in order to contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of the cold adaptation and the high catalytic efficiency of the enzyme at low and moderate temperatures. The catalytic core domain of the psychrophilic cellulase CelG from P. haloplanktis has been expressed, purified and crystallized and a complete diffraction data set to 1.8 Angstrom has been collected. The space group was found to be P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 135.1, b = 78.4, c = 44.1 Angstrom. A molecular-replacement solution, using the structure of the mesophilic counterpart Cel5A from Erwinia chrysanthemi as a search model, has been found. [less ▲]

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